Looking for particular instructional videos
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  1. #1
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    Looking for particular instructional videos

    Hey guys. So as the title says, there was an instruction class that was uploaded to Youtube that I remember seeing. The instructor is rather elderly stern looking fellow and has a lovely big beard. He opens the class first with telling his students that he will be giving them more information than they will be able to learn during their time in his class, and then goes on to explain and demonstrate formal and informal subdivision. It's in a very traditional looking classroom which reminds you of a manual arts class if anything else.

    EDIT: I'm an idiot. I entered all the keywords I could think of into the search bar, but I didn't bother to check my subscriptions. The channel is called 'Barnstone Studio's' after the similarly titled class that he runs.

    Here's his website. http://learn.barnstonestudios.com/videos/

    Here's one of the videos.


    This is the particular video that I am after, with quotes and everything.



    And a 2 hour colour theory video that's available for download. HELL YEAH

    http://vimeo.com/41986032

    Last edited by Beeston; August 6th, 2012 at 08:49 AM.


    Jordan Beeston
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    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    We do transmutational yoga and eat alchemy sandwiches and ride flying unicorns of esoteric freudian solipsism while googling anthropology. Whee!
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    TinyBird is offline Why you gotta be an angry burd Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    Hmm, didn't p_sage go to this guy's school? At least I remember him mention about at least possibly going there at some point. if here did, you could ask if he knows any more stuff there might be online.

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    I have this guys Art dvd set. His videos really focus on composition then anything else. There is alot of discussion of not just the golden section but other rectangles as well. it can get very confusing because he explains stuff really fast. He goes over existing art through history and how there is no coincidents of where each artist chose to place things. Again this video set is 99% composition.

    Last edited by Malifer; August 6th, 2012 at 02:40 PM.
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    This has raised an interesting question in my head.

    Complementary colours are complements regardless of which colour wheel you use, but you seem to get different pairs of complementary colours depending on which wheel you actually use. Cyan is the complement to Red if you're using an RBG wheel while Green is it's compliment if you're using the Fletcher wheel. Problem is that if you're painting digitally with an RBG wheel on hand you can't properly mix colours based on "Fletcher" theory (I don't know why I call it that, I should probably take the effort to attribute the correct terminology.) without looking at them through an RBG lens. So either you create a palette based on conventional colour theory which I guess is what we're supposed to do instead of creating them organically with the painter/photoshop colour wheel and RGB sliders. So I guess I'll have to invest more time into painting with acrylics so I have the traditionally conventional theory embedded in my head.

    I guess this is super basic stuff for people who can afford art school... sigh.

    I wish I had someone here to just spoon-feed me the correct information so I don't perpetuate my own bad habits and misconceptions. I'd buy all of Barnstone's videos if I lived in a magical pixie faerie land where rent didn't exist and art instructors didn't have families to feed...



    Jordan Beeston
    Sketchbook Livestream Infinity Wars
    Blessed are they who see beautiful things in humble places where other people see nothing. - Camille Pissarro

    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    We do transmutational yoga and eat alchemy sandwiches and ride flying unicorns of esoteric freudian solipsism while googling anthropology. Whee!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

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    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beeston View Post
    This has raised an interesting question in my head.

    Complementary colours are complements regardless of which colour wheel you use, but you seem to get different pairs of complementary colours depending on which wheel you actually use. Cyan is the complement to Red if you're using an RBG wheel while Green is it's compliment if you're using the Fletcher wheel. Problem is that if you're painting digitally with an RBG wheel on hand you can't properly mix colours based on "Fletcher" theory (I don't know why I call it that, I should probably take the effort to attribute the correct terminology.) without looking at them through an RBG lens. So either you create a palette based on conventional colour theory which I guess is what we're supposed to do instead of creating them organically with the painter/photoshop colour wheel and RGB sliders. So I guess I'll have to invest more time into painting with acrylics so I have the traditionally conventional theory embedded in my head.

    I guess this is super basic stuff for people who can afford art school... sigh.

    I wish I had someone here to just spoon-feed me the correct information so I don't perpetuate my own bad habits and misconceptions. I'd buy all of Barnstone's videos if I lived in a magical pixie faerie land where rent didn't exist and art instructors didn't have families to feed...
    Don't get too hung up on theory...first, it comes from trying to understand what we observe...and second, it can be limiting, as in you start worrying more about "correct theory" than intuitive or personal statement.

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