Amateur aspiring concept artist

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    Amateur aspiring concept artist

    hey guys I have always loved to draw but i never took it seriously and so now i have enrolled into university courses to carry out this dream. One problem im not that great at drawing, some may say bad. A friend of mine advised that i should get the bridgmans and study that thing to death. Just today i opened it and did my first exercise: the human figure. Please give me some insight as to what i can improve on. Any advice is much appreciated

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    focus more on proportions and draw 20 of them, not just one.

    Sketchbook

    need critique!
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    Hey there SoulShuffle. I suggest that you start with this:

    http://www.alexhays.com/loomis/

    Download the books and work through them. Bridgemans is good also.

    Start traditional, try not to get accustomed to the tablet... I can see you have an understanding from looking at your first piece. But the only way your going to get good at this is if you practice every day, follow loads of on-line tutorials and pinpoint your weaknesses as you progress.

    You need to ask yourself however, what are you willing to give up to dedicate all your time?

    You must be wise.

    Also! Make a sketchbook, there's loads of people here that will want to help. Myself included.

    Good luck!

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    would you say that Loomis would be better for people at my drawing level than Bridgmans? and which book should i start with?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoulShuffle View Post
    would you say that Loomis would be better for people at my drawing level than Bridgmans? and which book should i start with?
    Generally speaking, yes, Loomis is easier to start out with than Hogarth or Bridgman. It can be a bit overwhelming when you're presented with a fully drawn study and you have no idea where to start with it. Loomis breaks things up, shows the stages, and explains things in a relatively easy to understand manner. Personally, I would suggest to work with Loomis and then expand into other books for further explanation / viewpoints when needed. For starting out, "Fun With a Pencil" might be what you're looking for. When I first began drawing, that was one of my main references and it truly did make a difference. To this day, I continue to go back to that book once and awhile. It starts off with more cartoonish looking figures and slowly advances you into some of the harder stuff. If anything, it will give you the confidence to attempt some of the harder books!

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    thanks Fault thats some good advice, ill be sure to try the Loomis books ASAP. Should i continue on with his other books after, or advance to Bridgmans?

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    Quote Originally Posted by SoulShuffle View Post
    thanks Fault thats some good advice, ill be sure to try the Loomis books ASAP. Should i continue on with his other books after, or advance to Bridgmans?
    That's honestly up to you and your preferences. I hate to leave this open ended for you like this, but everyone eventually finds their own path it seems. If you enjoy what you learned in Loomis and you like his techniques, then continuing on to his other books would be a great idea. After you have learned these basic things and you're looking for a change, then you'd have the option of switching over and focusing on Bridgman, Hogarth, etc. Some people love Loomis while others dislike him. Whether or not you stick with one artist isn't the determinant in your success. I would recommend to use several books at any given time in order to view the same study in a different 'light' (so to speak). For example, a Loomis skull may leave you confused while a Hogarth skull makes more sense. In contrast, Bridgman hands could be far to complex for you while Loomis hands might be easier to understand.

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    Hey SoulShuffle. I'd like to add David Finch's videos to the mix, they really helped me get started. Try some observational exercises (google "Drawing on the right side of the Brain"), then draw things, then learn about perspective/hatching/tone and then start studying anatomy (or you could try doing all of them at the same time).
    Build up slowly, stay confident, and practice like crazy. It's really all a matter of pencil mileage.

    "Great job guys! I love you. You're fired."

    Sketchbook! Me vs Anatomy (and other things)
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    One thing that has helped me an immense amount is to think of your work as grunt work.

    Like you're a plumber, trying to get a job done. It brings you down from the clouds and gives you the patience required to do long, rigorous study.

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    My advice to you is to make as many sketches and studies daily as possible. Make 50 sketches and only 1 finished piece. Also focus on the proportions, shapes, poses, etc., don't get stuck with the details at first.

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