Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 27 to 39 of 68

Thread: How to Criticize a Work of Art

  1. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Controlled Chaos
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by Stoat View Post
    Miss! Do I have to read all this? Will it be on the test?
    Yep...lol "expect a snap-quiz when you least expect it
    I stopped fighting my inner demons; we're on the same side now...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Controlled Chaos
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Makes you wonder why the OP is a former educator
    "Former" because I was[at the time] & still am, a single parent of a special needs child who requires constant care. It became, too difficult to work as a full-time instructor & be there for my child's needs. This is just, Life; tough decisions have to made.
    Last edited by sipher_0; August 1st, 2012 at 01:13 PM.
    I stopped fighting my inner demons; we're on the same side now...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Controlled Chaos
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts

    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by Kamber Parrk View Post
    I'd participate in this thread, but it always seems, in threads like this, that I just end up attacking someone who ends up throwing the Asperger's Victim Card on the table. . .

    "Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger's syndrome or Asperger disorder, is an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that is characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction, alongside restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. It differs from other autism spectrum disorders by its relative preservation of linguistic and cognitive development. Although not required for diagnosis, physical clumsiness and atypical use of language are frequently reported."

    --Wikipedia
    Michael Fitzgerald is an Irish psychiatrist and professor of child and adolescent psychiatry at Trinity College, Dublin.[1] As of 2005, he had diagnosed over 900 individuals with Asperger syndrome.[2]
    "Psychiatric disorders can also have positive dimensions. I'm arguing the genes for autism/Asperger's, and creativity are essentially the same. We don't know which genes they are yet or how many there are, but we are talking about multiple genes of small effect. Every case is unique because people have varying numbers of the genes involved. These produce people who are highly focused, don't fit into the school system, and who often have poor social relationships and eye contact. They can be quite paranoid and oppositional, and usually highly moral and ethical. They can persist with a topic for 20-30 years without being distracted by what other people think. And they can produce in one lifetime the work of three or four other people."[3]

    In 2005's The Genesis of Artistic Creativity: Asperger's Syndrome and the Arts,[5] he identifies the following historical figures as possibly having been autistic:
    Writers – Hans Christian Andersen, Lewis Carroll, Bruce Chatwin, Arthur Conan Doyle, Herman Melville, George Orwell, Jonathan Swift and William Butler Yeats.
    Philosophers – A.J. Ayer, Baruch de Spinoza, Immanuel Kant, Simone Weil, and Ludwig Wittgenstein[6]
    Musicians – Bela Bartok, Ludwig van Beethoven, Glenn Gould, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Erik Satie.
    Artists – Vincent van Gogh, L.S. Lowry, Jack B. Yeats and Andy Warhol.
    In 2006's Unstoppable Brilliance: Irish Geniuses and Asperger's Syndrome,[7] he discusses Daisy Bates, Samuel Beckett, Robert Boyle, Éamon de Valera, Robert Emmet, William Rowan Hamilton, James Joyce, Padraig Pearse and W.B. Yeats.
    -
    If the folks[above]-"suffered" from Asperger's; all I can add, is Bring-It-On!
    I stopped fighting my inner demons; we're on the same side now...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 1,272 Times in 887 Posts
    I have no intention of berating the Aspergic amongst the community,

    It just seems that over the last couple years on CA I've gotten pulled into 2 or 3 discussions (like this) that end like:

    "You're a really really mean guy. . . and. . . and. . . I'll have you know that I have Aspergers. . . "

    [And, don't get me started on Devil-Worshipping-Potheads.]
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Kamber Parrk For This Useful Post:


  7. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Controlled Chaos
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Leonor View Post
    I thought it was:

    1. Ask questions.
    2. Find mistakes.
    3. Correct them.
    I really like what u wrote in regard to asking questions. What [kind] of information, are you looking for, from the Artist? You also, write that you find & correct "mistakes"- how do you, personally define a "mistake"-Are you referring to the "technical skills /draftsmanship" of the artist, or something different? When you write that You correct-the "Mistake"-why would you do that?-instead of letting the artist-figure out, a solution to the problem?
    I stopped fighting my inner demons; we're on the same side now...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Controlled Chaos
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    11
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    [QUOTE=eezacque@xs4all.nl;3515165]I think it very much depends on where you go with your critique: demonstrate your knowledge of art and its application (school, theoretical side), help an artist to improve (school, practical side), explain why artwork was accepted or rejected (show, contest, industry). I think your format serves the first use very well, while it is impractical for the other two.



    Partially what you write is true. I really want to respond & clarify, this issue of the theoretical side of Art & demonstration of [my] knowledge of art and its application[s]. However, I need to think about how, to frame what I want say. What I can write, straight-up is, to add that it is NOT -"MY" knowledge that is of import, but that knowledge of the individual artist, so, as to be able to justify, his/her *Intent* in creating the work. This is why when someone mentioned -"Asking Questions", I was interested to know/learn what kind of information the person thought was neccesary to learn from the artist...
    I will respond-back...However "Art-Shows/Competitions" ?! OMG! Rule of thumb-1]-Know thy Judge...If the Judge is an Artist, well it's easy to find to find-out what kind of work-your judge prefers, isn't it & create accordingly. Please...someone could be, Totally Brilliant & gather enough rejection slips [from various shows, ect] to paper his/her wall with.
    I stopped fighting my inner demons; we're on the same side now...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,082
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,197 Times in 1,728 Posts
    My focus when speaking to young art students is to expand their perspective... so they begin to more fully appreciate the nature of artistic quality, the knowledge base of working pros and the breadth of considerations associated with either. Epistemological humility is the general result, along with respect for the accomplishments and imaginative candle power of the best artists.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #34
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    3,234
    Thanks
    860
    Thanked 848 Times in 457 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post

    An artist who knows how to make a masterwork, knows how to critique a painting. Everybody else is faking it to one degree or another (depending on the skill level evident in their works.)
    Well, that's unusual but I mostly agree with Kev.
    I have just a caveat on this part above. Mostly because I know great artists who can't express themselves for some reason and couldn't give a crit if their lives depended on it. And I know a few art directors who are much better at art directing than they are at painting. Maybe their critiques are not structured the same way a master painter with normal eloquence would, but I find their critiques very competent and valuable. I think however that they have to train and learn to get to that point, not just be self important twats.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Qitsune For This Useful Post:


  12. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    737
    Thanks
    477
    Thanked 497 Times in 270 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    My focus when speaking to young art students is to expand their perspective... so they begin to more fully appreciate the nature of artistic quality, the knowledge base of working pros and the breadth of considerations associated with either. Epistemological humility is the general result, along with respect for the accomplishments and imaginative candle power of the best artists.
    What do you mean by expand their perspective? (I can make assumptions of what you mean, but I'd rather be clear

    I'm also meh on the whole compliment sandwich thing. Yes, it's a great idea to encourage students with what they did right, but frankly that's not at all how it works in production. No one spends much if any time going over what went right so the idea of having to come up with two positives around a negative seems rather restrictive.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,082
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,197 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Qitsune - Competent art directors generally have a mastery of their necessities, which is really a question of understanding the assignment and its relationship to the target commercial market. They might be better suited than an artist to critique certain aspects of the artist's work. (surprised to hear I am mostly disagreeable to you. )

    Alice - to expand the perspective - the introduction of wider/bigger/broader classes of information, causing a scalar increase in aesthetic awareness, aka a paradigm shift. To blow the mind, in common parlance.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  15. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Savannah, GA
    Posts
    3,091
    Thanks
    1,795
    Thanked 1,557 Times in 608 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by kev ferrara View Post
    to expand the perspective - the introduction of wider/bigger/broader classes of information, causing a scalar increase in aesthetic awareness, aka a paradigm shift. To blow the mind, in common parlance.
    I know you're really knowledgeable, kev, but seriously?

    Meh. I guess it does add a bit of character to your posts since you never use an avatar.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  16. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    2,715
    Thanks
    2,951
    Thanked 1,821 Times in 939 Posts
    Kev's name is it's own avatar.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Star Eater For This Useful Post:


  18. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,338
    Thanks
    283
    Thanked 1,343 Times in 473 Posts
    Sipher, I appreciate the effort you've taken in writing your posts.

    However, if you are open to receiving critique yourself, I'd like to offer some. You use far too many dashes, brackets and asterisks. It would be far easier to read if you simply used sentences with a more traditional structure. It makes my eyes want to bleed.


    Thank you.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  19. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Dusty For This Useful Post:


Page 3 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Another work to criticize
    By ovicristo in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: December 25th, 2009, 07:44 PM
  2. criticize me pls
    By RX-93 in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 13th, 2008, 05:31 PM
  3. Criticize me.
    By ZeppelinRules in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 31st, 2008, 04:05 AM
  4. Art: My work...(criticize me too, it's here for that)
    By giusep in forum FINISHED ART & ARTWORK
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: February 9th, 2008, 07:19 AM
  5. Art: Criticize my work--subdivision model
    By dumb_n00b in forum 3D ART, SCULPTURE ART & TOY ART
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 9th, 2007, 06:53 AM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook