Tracing
 
View testimonialsView Artwork
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 34

Thread: Tracing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    343
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 65 Times in 48 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Tracing

    So I read this article on Muddy Colors about tracing today and I was wondering what the general opinion is here?

    For myself the idea of tracing seems to beat the entire point of drawing. If you are going to trace you could just as well take a photocopy or scan the image and photoshop it in whatever way you want/need. Same reason why I'm not really fond of matte painting (not to disrespect any Matte painters, it's just not my thing).

    But on the other hand, if I were in the same position and under the same conditions (tight deadline, using it as a learning experience, taking the drawing beyond the reference, ...) I could see myself starting the trace things to make the image all it can and should be. I can even see that it could help understand certain shapes that you have issues with.

    Still it seems a slippery slope. I'd be afraid that I'd start fooling myself into thinking that I'm an awesome draftsman, while in fact I'm just tracing.

    So, do you trace?
    Would you ever trace? If so, under what conditions?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Vienna
    Posts
    2,109
    Thanks
    801
    Thanked 911 Times in 455 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    For myself the idea of tracing seems to beat the entire point of drawing.
    about 8 months ago (maybe only 5) i would have agreed with you about that. but then ive been working on some projects a friend of mine been artdirecting, and he repeatedly told me to incorporate tracing in my workflow, which seemed so wrong at the time. due to time constraints though, i had to give that stance up... and let me tell you... tracing is not as easy as it looks.
    also gregs points 2-4 are particularly important there... dont stop to draw and design just because you got some underlaying guides.

    i still didnt like it though, because i still somewhat thought its wrong and i had a hard time to incorporate it, so it fit my drawings.

    2-3 weeks ago i decided to go into storyboards and keyvisuals for the ad industry again, and quite soon got a call if a wanted to do some frames for a car-spot. i didnt get the gig (fortunately?) because i had no car drawings to show, but i sat down and wanted to get able to do cars aswell. i doodled a whole evening using various photos from google, but they all turned out crap. i couldnt get the proportions and the designs right. next day i decided to trace a few quickly and this really made me much more aware of proportions and design, because i wouldnt spend my whole attention on getting ellipses and angles correct. took me a few runs to get out of the simply copying state, to investigating what the important parts are that make 1) a car look like a car and 2) a specific car design. needless to say the sketches i made after that without tracing turned out much stronger .

    if deadlines get really tight, i now feel much better suited to effectively use tracings (because they are not simply copied anymore), yet got a much better feeling, because im confident, that if time permits, i can aswell draw them from scratch.

    wow turned out to be much longer than what i aimed for. o.0

    newest sketchbook
    oil paintings

    "Have only 4 values, but all the edges you want." Glen Orbik
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to sone_one For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ypsilanti,MI,USA
    Posts
    649
    Thanks
    707
    Thanked 444 Times in 226 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Re-read the Manchess piece. To trace successfully you have to be fully mentally engaged throughout the process. To paraphrase, "trace as though you're drawing, not as though you're tracing".

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to Cory Hinman For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,679 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you can't draw, you can't trace.
    Also, scroll down to the bottom of the page and check out the "Similar Threads" links.

    Last edited by Elwell; July 27th, 2012 at 08:43 AM.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    639
    Thanks
    162
    Thanked 125 Times in 108 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When these threads come up I always think of this quote from Loomis.

    "Without a knowledge of perspective and the lighting of the basic forms, or some idea of measuring and proportion, the artist becomes a slave to photostats, projectors, or any other mechanical means that will substitute for the knowledge he lacks. If he traces or projects photographs instead of drawing his subject, the result will show up in his work. Such an artist will seldom reach the front rank, unless his work has other qualities that somehow make it better than the work of other photograph copyists. If a drawing is to be individual and dynamic, the artist must use the camera only to provide something to draw from, as he would draw from a model. The camera does not see the same perspective or proportion as do the two human eyes. Being a slave to the camera usually leaves the stamp of the photographic on a man's work. If you use photographs, square them off and draw, but always draw, don't trace."

    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

    DA

    Sketch Book
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,810
    Thanks
    2,715
    Thanked 5,984 Times in 2,414 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Dean Cornwell said much the same thing Loomis did before photography about people who were slaves to their models. He admonished people who could not draw the story character using the model only as a guide.

    Here is the quote

    I have known illustrators to lack imagination to the extent that they allow or depend on the model to give them an interpretation. Very rarely have I ever found a model that can get into a pose in spirit or drawing the way I would like it on canvas. You should know enough about drawing so that your action or posture is definitely established on your canvas before ever calling the model.

    I think the problem comes in when everyone sees Manchess or whoever paint that way and they ignore what he says about drawing and just go "well he traces" so the bar keeps dropping.

    It used to be whoever could draw the best from a real model in Cornwell's time (imagine if that was the standard now); then it was whoever could draw the best using photo-reference heavily; Now its whoever traces the best, pretty soon it will be whoever does the best paint-over of a photo or 3d models and who cares if you built them, just steal them or screen capture them, screw copyright.

    Of course no one is saying this is the golden age of illustration and I doubt it will be remembered well compared to the last 100 years. Of course some people will stand out because they had their own high standards and maintained them.

    Last edited by dpaint; July 27th, 2012 at 12:05 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  12. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ypsilanti,MI,USA
    Posts
    649
    Thanks
    707
    Thanked 444 Times in 226 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well, Loomis is wrong, except maybe in the perfect, deadline-free world he inhabited. The history of illustration shows scores of successful artists who could both draw very well and, yes, traced. Again, go back to the Manchess piece on muddycolors.blogspot.com to read an excellent, living artist/illustrator's account of tracing in his process, note how he echoes Elwell's contention that you have to know how to draw to trace, and let's just let poor Andrew rest awhile.

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,810
    Thanks
    2,715
    Thanked 5,984 Times in 2,414 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Cory Hinman View Post
    Well, Loomis is wrong, except maybe in the perfect, deadline-free world he inhabited.
    A little knowledge of art history will save you from making ignorant statements like this one.

    In the land of the blind the one eyed man is king.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  15. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    639
    Thanks
    162
    Thanked 125 Times in 108 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thinking about this, the goal to me has always been to be able to draw whatever I want with just a pencil and paper, and nothing else. Its a completely unrealistic goal and I know I will never reach it but if you have a goal like that you can think of tracing and ask, is this bringing me closer to that goal or taking me further away?

    If you have to trace in order to meet a deadline then that's fine, but if that was me I would be asking myself what could I learn so that at some point I wouldn't need to trace to meet that deadline. Wouldn't that be a skill worth having?

    Maybe I'm just crazy.

    "The whole point of practice is to do it until you can do it right." - dpaint

    DA

    Sketch Book
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  16. #10
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,679 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    "Never draw anything you can copy, never copy anything you can trace, never trace anything you can cut out and paste up."
    Wally Wood
    Quote mining is fun!


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  18. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,341
    Thanks
    283
    Thanked 1,343 Times in 473 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    There is good tracing and bad tracing.

    I've come to the opinion that it's very obvious if you are one of the bad tracers...and it doesn't really matter if you do it then anyway.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to Dusty For This Useful Post:


  20. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ypsilanti,MI,USA
    Posts
    649
    Thanks
    707
    Thanked 444 Times in 226 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    A little knowledge of art history will save you from making ignorant statements like this one.

    In the land of the blind the one eyed man is king.
    Loomis in this quote is categorical about tracing. "If you're tracing, you obviously can't draw". Whereas Elwell and Manchess maintain drawing ability is what allows you to trace. Am I wrong about the number of illustrators who have traced? Is "scores" over-stating?

    Elwell, I can't find it right now, but it seems to me I've seen the Wood quote end with the words, "because you probably can''t."

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  21. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Cory Hinman View Post
    Re-read the Manchess piece. To trace successfully you have to be fully mentally engaged throughout the process. To paraphrase, "trace as though you're drawing, not as though you're tracing".
    One way to do this is to trace lightly, treating the original as a rough guide, and then remove the original and finish the drawing without tracing...

    This is essentially what I do when I transfer a drawing To canvas... First I project it, and trace the basic shapes from the projection lightly with a pastel pencil. Then I turn off the projector and go over the drawing with brown paint to solidify it and add details. This gives me a chance to check everything one more time and make last-minute edits and refinements.

    (Okay, that example is based on tracing my own drawing, but you could do similar with a reference...)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  22. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to QueenGwenevere For This Useful Post:


  23. #14
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,679 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've never heard that version of the quote. Either way, it really, really helps if you can draw like Wally Wood. (Which you probably can't.)


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  24. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  25. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Cambridge UK
    Posts
    5,460
    Thanks
    6,454
    Thanked 4,521 Times in 2,457 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Tracing is pretty standard practice in car design.
    The important thing is being really fast in generating ideas. Productivity always trumps misguided ideas that tracing is in some way always wrong.
    You get an image of a similar class car in a good perspective, put it in the back cover of a layout pad and draw your own design ideas over the top on the back page.. then you can quickly trace your own drawing introducing changes.

    Last edited by Velocity Kendall; July 27th, 2012 at 01:44 PM.
    sb most art copied to page 1
    Weapons of Mass Creation 2011 ::: Add your favourites!
    skype: velocitykendall
    facebook: Alface Killah
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  26. The Following User Says Thank You to Velocity Kendall For This Useful Post:


  27. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Kansas city, MO
    Posts
    1,167
    Thanks
    1,423
    Thanked 867 Times in 333 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When I'm working on someone else's time and tracing is more efficient I'll trace for accuracy the draw over it. When it's my own time I'll draw with a blindfold on for all I care. A client doesn't give a flying shit about your process so much as the end result.

    Jay's CA.org Sketchbook:
    Jay's Conceptart.org sketchbook

    Check out my portfolio:
    http://jasonrossart.carbonmade.com

    Check out my blog:
    http://mind2pixels.blogspot.com

    "Practice" DOES NOT make perfect...
    "Perfect Practice" makes perfect...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  28. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Jason Ross For This Useful Post:


  29. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,287
    Thanks
    219
    Thanked 167 Times in 106 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Dean Cornwell quote

    I have known illustrators to lack imagination to the extent that they allow or depend on the model to give them an interpretation. Very rarely have I ever found a model that can get into a pose in spirit or drawing the way I would like it on canvas. You should know enough about drawing so that your action or posture is definitely established on your canvas before ever calling the model.
    I'm sure he meant, making a sketch of the gesture you want from your imagination, then bringing in the model. Not just duplicate the model in front of you. Surely he would have no problem with Rockwell's methods of tracing from his photographs.

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Last edited by Bowlin; July 27th, 2012 at 01:56 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  30. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Bowlin For This Useful Post:


  31. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Cambridge UK
    Posts
    5,460
    Thanks
    6,454
    Thanked 4,521 Times in 2,457 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Exactly Jason. And the last thing some client wants is a tracing of an existing design line for line, so that kind of ripping off is pointless from the start.

    sb most art copied to page 1
    Weapons of Mass Creation 2011 ::: Add your favourites!
    skype: velocitykendall
    facebook: Alface Killah
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  32. The Following User Says Thank You to Velocity Kendall For This Useful Post:


  33. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Kweckduck View Post
    For myself the idea of tracing seems to beat the entire point of drawing. If you are going to trace you could just as well take a photocopy or scan the image and photoshop it in whatever way you want/need.
    I'm curious, did you read the actual article?

    I mean it counters even what you just posted now

    2. Draw, don’t trace.
    When I draw, I remember that using the point of the pencil is boring if all the line weight is the same. Same for tracing. I use the side of the lead, roll it, angle it, vary it for shadow lines, hair, folds, trees, etc. I get different line weight by varying the pressure on the pencil. Ultimately, you’re doing a drawing. SO DRAW.

    3. Edit detail.
    Forget about tracing every little subtle light shift, or shadow, every tree branch or eyelash. Forget about drawing every strand of hair. Draw for shape, draw for tone. Generalize the reference for the most part. It’s a guide.

    4. It’s a guide.
    When you trace under something like an Artograph, drive yourself to get good enough to draw with it. It’s not about tracing the image exactly. It’s about using the image as a guide to correct proportions and delineate shadows, depth, line, and contrast. Give it your own technique, otherwise your work looks lifeless, pedestrian, lame. It’ll look like you traced it. Exaggerate. Use fluid lines. Any ol’ goof can follow lines. Draw with it.

    5. Use your own photography.
    Shoot what you need. Best that way. The internet is full of pictures you need for reference, but I use them only as reference to draw from. I still need to make the sketch my own. Whenever you can, buy the reference you need. Better for everyone that way.

    6. Distortion Happens.
    No photograph records life exactly. Photos adjust the image from three dimensions to two. It’s already distorted. But you have to know when it’s telling you a lie about reality. Do not believe that photographs are real or telling you about reality. They do not. You must learn to recognize when they do and don’t and be able to compensate. Besides, it’s a GUIDE.

    7. Perfect the composition.
    First, I design the composition with thumbnails. Then I use reference to draw separate elements of a complex composition on separate slips of tracing paper. I move the sheets around until the composition is refined, perfected. It’s a composition guide. Artists have been using this since the Dawn of Illustration. Today, you’ll likely do this by cutting and pasting the reference together on the computer. It’s the same thing.

    8. Use it sparingly.
    As I trained with tracing, I used it less and less. It instantly improved my drawing skills, especially drawing from my head. It improved my memorization skills, but I had to focus on it. The next time you draw from life, you’ll understand what you learned from tracing. The next time you trace, you’ll understand more from your life drawing. Back and forth, back and forth. --What? Did you think there was a straight line to skill? C’mon


    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  34. The Following 9 Users Say Thank You to Arshes Nei For This Useful Post:


  35. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ypsilanti,MI,USA
    Posts
    649
    Thanks
    707
    Thanked 444 Times in 226 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    I've never heard that version of the quote. Either way, it really, really helps if you can draw like Wally Wood. (Which you probably can't.)
    Yeah, assuming I got that right I had interpreted it to mean "do any of these things as a considered solution to a given problem, but if you're just looking for an easy out, oboy!"

    What I liked about the Manchess article was how he disclosed how to be mentally engaged while tracing. Bring your accumulated knowledge and understanding to your ref, and go by them when the ref is presenting something contrary. This of course works really well for Manchess, given his experience. Also, seek to expand your knowledge and understanding somehow while tracing. Learn from it. I think if your mind is engaged this way, you should be able to avoid the trap of a dead-line tracing, the bad kind.

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  36. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    1,238
    Thanks
    889
    Thanked 1,535 Times in 567 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I am so sick of the this tracing debate. Some of you need to go back and read what Greg said carefully. If you suck, tracing will not make you not suck. If you're good, tracing won't make you better but might save you some time. It's an effective teaching tool so I use it. Part of the problem is the digital age. We associate tracing with the digital version where the machine does so much of the work.

    The issue is lines. We all have our moral lines. It's hard enough to make our own without making them for others.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  37. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to bcarman For This Useful Post:


  38. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,810
    Thanks
    2,715
    Thanked 5,984 Times in 2,414 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Cory Hinman View Post
    Loomis in this quote is categorical about tracing. "If you're tracing, you obviously can't draw". Whereas Elwell and Manchess maintain drawing ability is what allows you to trace. Am I wrong about the number of illustrators who have traced? Is "scores" over-stating?
    I was challenging your little piece of hyperbole about Loomis. Do you really think deadlines were not an issue in Loomis' time? Not only was there a higher standard for the work, but there wasn't the glut of technological aids and information we have now.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  39. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  40. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,810
    Thanks
    2,715
    Thanked 5,984 Times in 2,414 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Bowlin View Post
    I'm sure he meant, making a sketch of the gesture you want from your imagination, then bringing in the model. Not just duplicate the model in front of you. Surely he would have no problem with Rockwell's methods of tracing from his photographs.
    Cornwell as well as Lyendecker never used photos according to their biographers. Rockwell himself says in My Life as an Illustrator he would hide his projector when Lyendecker would come to his studio because he was ashamed of using it. Remember Rockwell used live models without photography until the mid thirties and then went over to photography after that.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  41. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  42. #24
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,679 Times in 5,021 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    I'm curious, did you read the actual article?
    I really think you're asking too much of people in this day and age.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  43. The Following 8 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  44. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ypsilanti,MI,USA
    Posts
    649
    Thanks
    707
    Thanked 444 Times in 226 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    I was challenging your little piece of hyperbole about Loomis. Do you really think deadlines were not an issue in Loomis' time? Not only was there a higher standard for the work, but there wasn't the glut of technological aids and information we have now.
    Lordy, I didn't mean that. I thought it was clearly hyperbole not meant to be taken seriously. Of course now I can't for the life of me tell you why I said it in the first place, except for being heated about this non-controversy the way Bcarman is.

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  45. The Following User Says Thank You to Cory Hinman For This Useful Post:


  46. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Vienna
    Posts
    2,109
    Thanks
    801
    Thanked 911 Times in 455 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    people complain about tracing yet fail to see what it takes to make a successful picture...

    like everything beyond nailing proportions would be a walk in the park any monkey could do....

    thats why objected the way i did on subjects like anatomy in the past. all this rambling is not going to get you anywhere i think. your pictures speak for themself.

    tracing actually became a non issue to me... it just doesnt matter... either your work is strong, or it lacks no matter what tools you employed...

    newest sketchbook
    oil paintings

    "Have only 4 values, but all the edges you want." Glen Orbik
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  47. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to sone_one For This Useful Post:


  48. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,287
    Thanks
    219
    Thanked 167 Times in 106 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Cornwell as well as Lyendecker never used photos according to their biographers. Rockwell himself says in My Life as an Illustrator he would hide his projector when Lyendecker would come to his studio because he was ashamed of using it. Remember Rockwell used live models without photography until the mid thirties and then went over to photography after that.
    Right and I agree with you. I was just trying to show that Rockwell didn't just copy the photographs, but changed them to the ideas he had before he took the photos. Surely Cornwell would like how Rockwell changed the paintings in comparison to his photos. He wouldn't just say Rockwell lacked imagination.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  49. The Following User Says Thank You to Bowlin For This Useful Post:


  50. #28
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I would have to say that tracing is an extremely appropriate way of drawing, especially for beginners. Not only does it produce beautiful work (sometimes) but it gives newbies an idea of composition, consistent strokes, and spacial relationship.

    When I first started drawing I did nothing but trace, and believe it or not it takes more skill that one might think. It's a great way to learn.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  51. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,287
    Thanks
    219
    Thanked 167 Times in 106 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Cory Hinman View Post
    Loomis in this quote is categorical about tracing. "If you're tracing, you obviously can't draw".
    I can't find that quote from Loomis. Do you remember where exactly he says this? Perhaps he means something different out of context. He didn't condemn tracing when used to create ideas and pulling information from clippings. Apparently he was ok with moving things around in the picture using the tracing paper and changing things a bit so that it wasn't a direct swipe.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  52. The Following User Says Thank You to Bowlin For This Useful Post:


  53. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Very cool sketch. And I've not heard that quote either, but I can see that being the case. As stated before it is a great method for learning how to draw, but as the above sketch shows, it can merely be used as a method for creativity and understanding content.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook