Beginner looking for help. ^^

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  1. #1
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    Question Beginner looking for help. ^^

    Now at the age of 18 I'm just about to start out with drawing for real, meaning I want to give it my all to one day be able to draw what I see in my fantasy. I'm a very bad artist and I have very little knowledge about drawing, so looking from the bigger picture I know nothing at all.

    And what I'd like to ask is really just, what are the basics of the basics that you should start learning before anything else? I've come to the conclusion that anatomy, light/shadows and clothing/materials(folds, how it reacts to wind etc.) is very important.

    If you have anything else you'd like to tell a beginner like me I'd be happy to listen.

    Lastly, part of the reason as to why I am asking this is because I'm trying to make a schedule for myself where I practice different areas and so on, to help me keep my motivation up with the sense that I'm actually following some sort of plan.

    With that said it's time to get back to drawing, peace!

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  3. #2
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    Draw real objects and people and just draw as much as you can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Star Eater View Post
    Draw real objects and people and just draw as much as you can.
    So real life drawings is the best way to learn? If that's the case then I better get right to it! And by that I'd guess I can scrap the whole idea about a schedule and whatever.

    Another thought that just came up, when drawing from real life should I study beside that as well? Like reading about anatomy, light/shadows and such so that I can understand why they appear when I draw real life stuff. Or is that a waste of time which would be better put into actually drawing?

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    I'm sure I don't need to tell the value of theory combined with practical work. If you want to learn about light and shadow
    from a book I wholeheartedly suggest 'Gurneys Color and Light A Guide for the Realist Painter.'

    Nothing beats the satisfaction and experience gained from drawing real people, places
    things...etc. Draw for fun as well, just draw, draw, draw and enjoy it. Life drawing is
    how you not only stay sharp, but also hone your skills as you observe real dimensional
    forms and translate them onto paper.

    So, yeah, just draw. Draw and put your work in the crit section for
    advice and tips. Also open up your own sketchbook thread and fill it with your
    studies, personal works, whatever.

    Just draw.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Star Eater View Post
    Draw real objects and people and just draw as much as you can.
    This. Since you don't know anything, you have to learn everything, so doing anything will teach you something. The most important thing to do is start. The second most important thing to do is not stop. Beyond that, it's just details and opinion.


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  9. #6
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    Think about what you're trying to achieve as you draw. Learning analytical thinking in the beginning will save you a lifetime of frustration. Learn to visualize the objects you draw to gain a better understanding of said object.

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krillz View Post
    Another thought that just came up, when drawing from real life should I study beside that as well? Like reading about anatomy, light/shadows and such so that I can understand why they appear when I draw real life stuff. Or is that a waste of time which would be better put into actually drawing?
    Reading about things IN ADDITION TO drawing is not a waste of time. Reading about things INSTEAD OF drawing would be a waste of time.

    So, draw a lot, read up on things if you're curious or if you have questions about them, it all helps... But drawing a lot helps the most, especially at the beginning when you haven't yet developed your brain-eye-hand coordination.

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    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    But drawing a lot helps the most, especially at the beginning when you haven't yet developed your brain-eye-hand coordination.
    And it gives you some context for the stuff you're reading. If you can connect the theory to problems you have already experienced or observations you have made on your own, it's likely to stick.

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    Don't forget to feed your imagination. Practiced study goes so far, but i think it's good and just as valuable to keep your eyes open, learn as much about the world as you can, when you don't have a sketchbook look closely and observe, experience the world, draw from life, from imagination, and from experiences and read every book that you can get your hands on (art or non-art). And as Elwell said, don't stop.

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    and what better motivation a beginner can have than our all time favorited: The mindcandyman's Sketchbook

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