Houdon 12" or Fem. Anatomical. Fig. V1 23"

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 18 of 18
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Question Houdon 12" or Fem. Anatomical. Fig. V1 23"

    Houdon 12" or Fem. Anatomical. Fig. V1 23"
    Hi everybody. I am going to buy reference ecorche figure. But I'm confused. I have 2 options;

    -Houdon's 12" tall ecorche figure by Keropian (200$)
    http://www.keropiansculpture.com/houdon_ecorche.html

    or

    -Female Anatomy Figure V1 (325$) by Andrew Cawrse
    http://www.amazon.com/Female-Anatomy...=Andrew+Cawrse

    Is Houdon's 12" is too small for details?

    thanks a lot.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,379
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 457 Times in 322 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I cannot answer your question, but I'm puzzled as to why you would spend hundreds of dollars on an anatomical model, while a good atlas teaches you more?

    As an aside, a teacher of mine came to tell me that the model had lost his penis. I must have looked a bit puzzled, as I had met the model hours before, and he looked okay. She added that it was probably stolen, as it was only attached by a little magnet. Only then I realized she was talking about some anatomical model

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    WI, Milwaukee area
    Posts
    263
    Thanks
    152
    Thanked 117 Times in 96 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I have no personal experience to speak of here, but this ecorche figure comes highly recommended. Apparently all of that company's products have a great level of detail, and artistic craftsmanship. The photos do look really nice; I like their choices with what anatomy to show, and some limbs are removable too. I'm planning to buy from them once I get enough money...

    Eezacque - I think it's kind of obvious that a three-dimensional figurine of a whole human figure would be more useful than a selection of 2D photos or drawings? They both have their uses, sure, and a good ecorche figure is definitely a serious investment... but if it's your career, you're gonna have to make investments into it. This is a reference tool too, for all your drawings. You can pose it, turn it, light it.. versus a 2D photo of something someone else chose stuck in the a situation they chose.
    Funny story though.

    My sketchbook - come critique me!
    jesse martel@tumblr
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you have the time, consider making your own ecorche out of supersculptey, wax, or oilclay.

    You'll learn quite a bit by making it.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Sebastien Bailard For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Torquay
    Posts
    637
    Thanks
    528
    Thanked 192 Times in 162 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Try L'Ecorché for the iPad.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,379
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 457 Times in 322 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JesseM View Post
    I think it's kind of obvious that a three-dimensional figurine of a whole human figure would be more useful than a selection of 2D photos or drawings? They both have their uses, sure, and a good ecorche figure is definitely a serious investment... but if it's your career, you're gonna have to make investments into it. This is a reference tool too, for all your drawings. You can pose it, turn it, light it.. versus a 2D photo of something someone else chose stuck in the a situation they chose.
    Funny story though.
    It is only useful for exactly the pose you buy, and shows you only the outer layer of muscles...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    453
    Thanks
    45
    Thanked 192 Times in 104 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    bilginey: it depends on what you want to do with it. If you need some reference for just holding in your hand it should be large enough. But if you´d like to draw it from a distance like you do with cast drawing it is way too small since you need to step back from it.

    If you want to learn the names an positions of muscles an anatomical atlas would suit your needs better.

    But don´t forget: a live model teaches you a lot too. If you pay a model 10$/h you can get 20 hours of drawing time for 200$. I used to work as a nude model an got 13€ per hour which is 10$/h. If you have the space at home (or wherever you make your art) I´m sure you´ll find one or more students who would pose for you. In Germany all these expenses are tax deductible (mannequin and model)

    www.ClassicalAtelier@HOME.com
    My website for learning traditional fine art on your own! --- Derived from THIS thread at CA.org
    ------------ ♦ ♦ ♦ ------------
    www.cast-drawing.com
    drawing casts (geometric shapes, anatomical casts, skull), tutorials on Bargue drawing and cast drawing, Willow Charcoal, free drawing exercises
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    WI, Milwaukee area
    Posts
    263
    Thanks
    152
    Thanked 117 Times in 96 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    It is only useful for exactly the pose you buy, and shows you only the outer layer of muscles...
    Did you look at the one I linked to? I like it precisely because it cuts into the form and reveals what's underneath. You can't truly pose the figure, no, but you can turn it, tilt it, and light it however you want. Furthermore, with removable limbs, you can take them off and try to pose them... but I agree, that is pushing it. Still, a three-dimensional reference from every angle imaginable, and you chose the lighting. That sounds much more inviting to me than a book with some premade pictures. There are times for both, definitely; I've got several anatomy books and I love them. Anatomy books have the advantage of text, where they can describe origins and inserts, function, and name muscles. They can also clearly show each system (ie, a drawing for just bones, a drawing for just muscles) and not have to balance overlap and sacrifice visibility sometimes like ecorches must. I'm not trying to belittle atlases! But an ecorche figure is where it all comes together--a little human you can hold in your hand, that may not name the muscle and describe its function but shows you how thick it is, how deep, how it fits into the human machine.
    If you think books are enough for you that's fine. But to me, it's the difference of drawing from photo and drawing from life.


    Re: Making an erorche figure is incredible practice. I've seen ads for ecorche workshops floating around the internet before... not cheap, but you walk away with no only a greater understanding of anatomy but a permanent reference tool.
    I would just be worried, if I made one on my own, that'd it be inaccurate. And then I'd reference it and screw up my drawings later...

    Leonor - there's an app for that? Seriously?
    Why don't I own an iPad already...

    My sketchbook - come critique me!
    jesse martel@tumblr
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #9
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    3,234
    Thanks
    860
    Thanked 847 Times in 457 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    A friend gave me advice on building my own. I'm shopping around for a plastic skeleton atm, and plan to do it over the summer. But there are ateliers and other places that give ecorche classes. I'd do that if it was an affordable option for me.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm a wood carver. I'll use it, as JesseM said how thick musle is or how deep to understand. And yes, hold it in my hand or step away from it for carving reference. I think I'll go with Houdon (price + easy to understand muscles rather than anatomical male figure V1)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JesseM View Post

    Leonor - there's an app for that? Seriously?
    Why don't I own an iPad already...
    Yes, it was a kickstarter project. They have a lite version out but waiting for completion of the full version.

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...my-for-artists

    It will come out for android sometime later as well.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    400
    Thanks
    217
    Thanked 178 Times in 83 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Yes, it was a kickstarter project. They have a lite version out but waiting for completion of the full version.

    http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/...my-for-artists

    It will come out for android sometime later as well.
    On a somewhat related note, I read in the latest ish of imagineFX that they created an actual analog brush for the iPad, also funded through Kickstarter. Sounded pretty neat.

    Apparently still not the same as real painting though, since you don't have the natural resistance you get with a regular canvas and paint.

    Last edited by MidgardSerpent; July 5th, 2012 at 03:31 PM.
    My Self-Portraits

    "Work for your self first. You can paint best the things you like or the things you hate. You cannot paint well when indifferent.
    Express a mental opinion about something you are sensitive to in life around you. There is a profound difference between sensitivity and sentimentality."

    ~ John Sloan Gist of Art
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    218
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 83 Times in 60 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    It is only useful for exactly the pose you buy, and shows you only the outer layer of muscles...
    Obviously you've never tried sculpting.

    My sketchbook:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=191977

    My page on Facebook, which I update much more often.

    https://www.facebook.com/MarkGrimArt
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,379
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 457 Times in 322 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by stabby2486 View Post
    Obviously you've never tried sculpting.
    I did, but it does not teach me about anatomy...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    453
    Thanks
    45
    Thanked 192 Times in 104 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    This guy is collectig dust for half a year now

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ypsilanti,MI,USA
    Posts
    649
    Thanks
    707
    Thanked 444 Times in 226 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Sculpting absolutely taught me about anatomy. The best series of classes I had in art school were with figure sculptor Louis Marinaro at U-M's art school, and this included a month-long workshop focussing on anatomy. The workshop was designed to improve your figure-drawing, because, frankly, nothing teaches you about plane-change like actually working in 3 dimensions.

    The classic Houdon ecorche is a very valuable study tool. The parts of the figure are varied enough to allow you to generate a number of poses from the presented pose with a little bit of thinking and, yes, the help of charts and illo's like in the Richer and Albinus books.

    I once owned a 12'' Houdon. it was from Sculpture House, and at that scale I was not pleased with the detailing. The forms of the arms and back were not well-defined, and there was no sense of the interlacing of the serratus muscles. I bought the next size up Sculpture House offered, 14 or 16'', I forget which, and the figure details were much better. The last time I moved, when I got married, I just gave my Houdon to the sculptor I'd been rooming with, rather than have to move one more thing. Since then I've thought about getting another, but definitely no smaller than 14-16". But the idea of just making one is compelling...

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    20
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 8 Times in 7 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm shopping around for a plastic skeleton atm, and plan to do it over the summer.

    Try making one out of supersculptey or suchlike, built up around a wire and aluminum foil armature?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    3,234
    Thanks
    860
    Thanked 847 Times in 457 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Sebastien Bailard View Post
    I'm shopping around for a plastic skeleton atm, and plan to do it over the summer.

    Try making one out of supersculptey or suchlike, built up around a wire and aluminum foil armature?
    I thought about that, my friend built her écorché on top of a wire armature her teacher built, but since I'm on my own, I'm worried about accuracy. Especially for bones like the pelvic bone that are hard to understand on paper.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook