Holding a pencil

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ann Arbor
    Posts
    39
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Holding a pencil

    Hey, call me scrub if I posted this in the wrong forum, but it's kind of a weird question that mostly exists because I'm curious.

    I'm wondering if there is a 'preferred' way to hold a pencil -- not so much in the finger placement on the impliment itself, rather how one holds their hand.

    I ask because I've been practicing my circles (scrub, told you) and I've noticed that when I have my hand on the paper, the shape gets distorted because I find myself stretching the fingers rather than the side of my hand.

    So, excuse the ensuing ramble here.

    Is it wiser to hold the entire hand up and off the paper itself? I've tried this, and I can say that I can barely write my name in that fashion.

    Would I be better off training myself to move my entire hand around on the paper? I foresee many smudged lines and shades in my future should I take that path.

    MY SKETCHBOOK OF CRAPTASTIC CIRCLES
    ----------------------------------------------
    "Just as food eaten without appetite is a tedious nourishment, so does study without zeal damage the memory by not assimilating what it absorbs."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Frankfurt, Germany
    Posts
    453
    Thanks
    45
    Thanked 192 Times in 104 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It depends. If you´d like to have your arm as an extention of your pencil - for example when standing away from the drawing board/easel you would hold it like a conductor holds the baton. It lets you make distinct lines and is good for construction. The movement comes from the shoulder and is less fine motoric. You have seen that you can´t really write your name with this technique.

    Similar effects can be achieved by holding the pencil near the end and put your hand onto the drawing - then let the wrist do the work. Your hand and forearm muscles do a better motoric job.

    But you can also lay your hand onto the drawing and hold it like when you are writing. This lets you better control your lines since it is much more fine motoric.

    www.ClassicalAtelier@HOME.com
    My website for learning traditional fine art on your own! --- Derived from THIS thread at CA.org
    ------------ ♦ ♦ ♦ ------------
    www.cast-drawing.com
    drawing casts (geometric shapes, anatomical casts, skull), tutorials on Bargue drawing and cast drawing, Willow Charcoal, free drawing exercises
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    So-Cal
    Posts
    3,427
    Thanks
    2,994
    Thanked 1,780 Times in 849 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The most general tip I can give you is to Draw from the shoulder or elbow and not the wrist or fingers. Much of this stuff has to do with mileage. If you draw from the wrist or fingers for too long you can get carpel tunnel (a common career killer).

    This stuff is easier to show then tell. That's why it's better to pay for good one on one instruction. But here are some vids that might help.



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,670 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TheMumm View Post
    I'm wondering if there is a 'preferred' way to hold a pencil -- not so much in the finger placement on the impliment itself, rather how one holds their hand.
    There are many different "preferred" grips, depending on the circumstances. The main movement can come from the fingers, the wrist, the elbow, or the shoulder. Even with the "writing" grip, try holding the pencil further back from the point and with a looser, more relaxed grip. The pencil isn't your enemy, there's no need to try to strangle it to death.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Noo Yawk
    Posts
    2,176
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 776 Times in 461 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Same deal with shooting: Go with what works for you. If you want to hold it all fancy-like, and you can work with it, go for it. Likewise, if you just hold it like you're holding a writing utensil, and you can work with it, go for it. The Art Police have yet to arrest and shoot me for holding the pencil the way I do-

    Hold on, there's someone at the door...

    Amateur Artist. Professional Asshole.

    Lookit the Pretty!

    Rule #1 of depicting soldiers: KEEP THE DAMN FINGER OFF THE DAMN TRIGGER.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ann Arbor
    Posts
    39
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Many thanks gentlepeoples! I'll get to those videos as soon as I can!

    MY SKETCHBOOK OF CRAPTASTIC CIRCLES
    ----------------------------------------------
    "Just as food eaten without appetite is a tedious nourishment, so does study without zeal damage the memory by not assimilating what it absorbs."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    35
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 21 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I tend to prefer an "overhand" grip with the pencil held horizontally -- as shown in this post: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...98&postcount=6

    It helps keep your wrist locked and your arm as the main source of movement. Then later I switch to precision/writing grip for fine details.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to neonnoodle For This Useful Post:


  10. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Ann Arbor
    Posts
    39
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    @neonnoodle - Holy crap! Just gave that a quick couple of strokes, I definitely like the feel of it. I'll have to experiment a little to get used to it, but that's super comfortable and I got some reasonably accurate lines considering I'd never held a pencil like that before. Thanks!

    MY SKETCHBOOK OF CRAPTASTIC CIRCLES
    ----------------------------------------------
    "Just as food eaten without appetite is a tedious nourishment, so does study without zeal damage the memory by not assimilating what it absorbs."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Jet City Suburbs
    Posts
    3,509
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 120 Times in 60 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I discuss this in the first few moments of my hit youtube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7YhybNS7seM

    I self-published a book on the fundamentals of drawing from life.

    http://www.amazon.com/Fundamentals-D...8951905&sr=8-1

    http://www.endlessunlimited.com
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Washington, US
    Posts
    1,194
    Thanks
    1,571
    Thanked 716 Times in 343 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Arenhaus' blog post about pencil grips pops up around the forums from time to time.

    http://chiseledrocks.com/main/musing...old_the_pencil

    My Sketchbook

    And then God said, "Let us make man in our likeness and our image. Let us make him ridiculously hard to draw so that poor artists everywhere will have to spend 10,000+ hours failing repeatedly before they can begin to capture the form and likeness onto a two-dimensional surface." And there was man. And it was good. And artists everywhere lost their minds.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to manlybrian For This Useful Post:


  14. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    171
    Thanks
    51
    Thanked 47 Times in 46 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I try not move my wrists that much but put more emphasis on the elbow movement

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook