Sketchbook: Sketchbook Without an Interesting Name; looking for crit

Join 500,000+ artists on ConceptArt.Org.

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 27 of 27
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts

    Sketchbook Without an Interesting Name; looking for crit

    I'm going to be posting my sketches and hopefully my progress here.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    My shading... I like to be able to do a lot of drawings, so a lot of times it's easier to just shade whatever which way to study, but then the drawings come out looking kinda trash.

    In regards to drawing eyes, I got this link from Tinybird:
    http://www.stanprokopenko.com/blog/2009/05/draw-eyes/

    I went to a figure drawing session at the Sketch Club. The model was really awesome and there were a lot of nice people and art there. I started out trying to get the proportions and a general pencil sketch in, and then tried to use shading to create a more detailed sense of dimension, but again, my inability to shade in a visually convincing way wins out again.

    I spoke to an old guy who was really good at constructional drawing after the session and he said that when he draws, he imagines the shape in his head and draws that instead of trying to draw the model directly. He also mentioned something about a vocabulary of mark making and I feel like that's something that might help me with my derpy shades.

    One thing that he said that I totally do not understand was that rendering and constructional drawing were separate; I either don't understand that reasoning or I don't agree. My thinking is that rendering can lend details to construction that pure line drawing can't...Maybe I'll understand his perspective more another day...it takes a while some times. >.>

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Here are some more eyes and some people and things I saw on my way to get my computer fixed (I really hope I can get it back soon!). I'm not always sure how to break things into planes when they're really squishy, like the bottom lid on an eye. I think doing a rough outline of the socket makes drawing the eye a bit easier, so even though the drawings still aren't that nice, they make a little more sense to me now.

    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    London
    Posts
    17
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Those are some VERY inspirational eye studies!! (Thank you for the helpful link!) Effective shading, buddy!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    301
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 105 Times in 97 Posts
    The eye studies are great indeed!
    But since you haven't posted a whole lot else it's hard to critique. Eyes are important but they're not everything a face has to offer^^
    I'm looking forward to seeing full portraits etc!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Cornwall, England
    Posts
    276
    Thanks
    89
    Thanked 67 Times in 65 Posts
    Very nice eyes and great link - thanks for the tip!

    The construction/rendering thing that the old chap mentioned, what else did he say? I'm curious about what he was trying to explain.

    Show us more stuff! More things please.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    I'm tired very tired so these might be weird post but I want you guys so much for stopping by and the kind words.

    I'm lad you were able to make use of the link, Mortiroth. I'm really paranoid about losing references so hopefully there will be many more helpful links to come.

    Xelar- right! So I am definitely gonna be studying the other stuff too. I feel like I learned a lot of interesting things about heads just today...regrettably everything else- like landscapes and compositions still seems really intimidating, so maybe I need to focus on that next.

    Royzy- As to that old guy, it's kind of difficult for me to recall everything of what he was saying. He was super verbose, and rather than just stating things outright, he kind of talked around them through metaphors and vague examples. So he would say 30 different things just to make one statement. It's been such a while since I spoke to him too, but I think what he might have been trying to get at was that the underlying structure of an object is different from the surface treatment that you apply to it. So, constructing and rendering (making sure everything is the right color, how the paint blends, etc.) are separate skills. If I see him again, I can ask for further clarification.

    Other than that, he mentioned not wanting to take longer than 20 minutes or so with a drawing, because he didn't want to get bogged down with unnecessary details. He talked about incorporating shapes and objects into visual vocabulary- if you want to draw a baby, draw 500 real babies, look at how they're made and then you can start to make them up on your own.

    Stuff like that.


    ------

    Here are some random sketches that I have for today-some cars, my cat, and a sleeping dude I saw on the bus. His determination to stay asleep during the noise and commotion of the ride was really impressive.

    There's also some leg construction drawings that I copied from another thread here on Conceptart. But I lost the link so I can't tell exactly where I got it from.

    Two other posts coming up shortly.

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    These are probably the ugliest notes ever, but putting them here any way.

    A lot of what I did this week was read this book called The Perspective Drawing Handbook by Joseph D'Amelio and he talks about this method of drawing objects or places in perspective where you:

    1. Draw an overhead of what you want to make
    2. Determine the viewer's position and the picture plane.
    3. Determine the vanishing points on this picture plane. Only planes parallel to one another share the same vanishing point. As the viewer's line of site parallel to these planes runs through the picture plane, it marks the || plane's vanishing point.
    4. Determine the size of the objects by linking them across the picture plane to the viewer. The further away objects are from the viewer the smaller they will appear in relation to their actual size.
    5. Transpose this picture plane with vanishing points and object widths into the horizon line of what will become the scene in perspective.


    This simple method never occurred to me before.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Okay, so here are some heads I did using the timed/gesture drawing tool at lovecastle.org/draw.

    Thanks to this (pdf) I learned about the Reilly method. Also learned that the same thing exists for heads as well as figures. The information that I was able to collect on that basically boils down to the information in thispost.

    I can barely retain the Loomis method of drawing heads, but seeing the planes of the head broken down like that was really helpful.

    Also tried experimenting with different mark-making methods. Shading in a circular motion as opposed to applying straight strokes to everything all the time helps. Obvious and small, but it makes a difference. The objective here was to make a bunch of really quick drawings, so I didn't mess with it to a noticeable extent, but still.

    On a couple of these heads, I missed the bottom 1/4th of the face. The head without the jaw is kind of freaky looking. Reminds me a bit of one of those pro life images with the aborted fetuses. Very unpleasant.

    Oh yeah, another note- I feel like I have trouble drawing the shape of a mouth when it smiles.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Studying more perspective and trying to come up with a way to break down the torso in a way that's easy for me. I always have trouble placing the arms on the shoulders. I think part of my problem is that in the past I always treated them as one object, grouping the shoulders and the torso as one mass when blocking the figure. However, the shoulders and arms are quite mobile so it doesn't really make sense (to me) to think of them as so closely linked of a unit.

    There's a lot of muscle, bone and sometimes fat action happening in the region of that body, so another part of my blocking troubles came from the fact that I wasn't treating that part of the body as properly elastic. The flesh on the top of the shoulder goes from being kind of a square shape when the arms are resting to more of a triangular one as the arms raise.

    I also wasn't fully cognizant of the fact that the distance between the start of the neck and the top of the shoulders is basically none. Uhh...

    So the perspective drawings. I still have a lot of trouble with...everything. But what I'm noticing the most right now are the distortions. The further the vanishing points, the less distortion there will be.

    I lost a lot of the perspective studies that I was doing, because they were on loose-leaf paper and I threw them away by accident. These are some of the ones I did in illustrator. It's easier to do a lot of them and try lots of different things drawing them in illustrator, but I feel like drawing on paper forces me to analyze what I'm doing more.

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Last edited by snacks ex machina; July 10th, 2012 at 07:34 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Cornwall, England
    Posts
    276
    Thanks
    89
    Thanked 67 Times in 65 Posts
    Haha he sounds like a pretty interesting guy. Thanks for the feedback on that

    Great to see all these different techniques and studies. Hadn't come across the lovecastle.org tool before, I'd only been familiar with Posemaniacs and Pixelovely.

    Would be cool to see some more 'completed' heads. Good shape and rendering on those two you put some detail into. Pretty sure Loomis says something about smiles being particularly tricky to execute, in his heads book. A page of expressions, showing the muscles, could be a good exercise.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    453
    Thanks
    123
    Thanked 519 Times in 189 Posts
    I'm curious as to why the mix of perspective and anatomy... the two things are defintiely both fundamentals, and both important to learn... but from my own personal experience I found it easier to flood my brain with just one subject at a time (so I'm slightly envious if you can handle both!). My suggestions for improving would be to consider the planes when you're sketching faces and try to get your pencil lines to follow the natural flow of what you're drawing. As an example, take the guys' forehead on the bottom left of your last head study page - there's some odd 45 degree cross hatching there, that would be much more effective if it had followed the curve of the forehead. Shading at those kind of angles isn't a bad thing, but it's usually best to do all your shading at a similar angle, or follow the form... in this case, you've done a bit of both, so I'm not sure to see it as just a patch of shadow, or whether to see it as lines describing the form of the object. The upper left profile head of the same page is much more expressive as you've followed the forms of the head and the flow of the hair much more nicely. Hope that's of some help, and hope you perservere, you've got a nice start going here.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Larisa/ Corfu, Greece
    Posts
    749
    Thanks
    96
    Thanked 251 Times in 247 Posts
    Your linework seem very well established!
    Just keep updating and see where it goes!
    Cheers!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #14
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    3,180
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 2,356 Times in 1,211 Posts
    Nice work. I like your hatching and mark-making.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Blah, I always feel like a criminal when I go for a really long time without uploading anything. But I also feel like a criminal when I pull out my scanner with the intentions of uploading my rinky dink sketches and drawings. I am deeply and irrationally ashamed of my "art" and I always feel like I've really gone and embarrassed myself after I've shown it somewhere. And then I feel like a criminal for feeling this way in the first place, because, Jesus Christ, get some self-esteem, right? It's like I'm trapped in an cycle of self-deprecation loathing. Oh bother.

    And, even after all of this, I'm getting ready to make another criminal move by not making any effort to hunt down any sketches I've done that aren't within direct arm's reach of me.

    The only sketch that I was really convinced I wanted to upload was one that I can't find anymore anyway. I think I might have tossed it when I was cleaning earlier today. ANYWAY. It was a group of gesture drawings. I always wonder about how I can learn to draw faster, and with these I felt like I really managed to pull it off. The idea is basically to draw it right the first time. As I later saw someone else on these forums say, "Draw slow to draw fast." Usually I just hack away at a line or figure hoping that one of the many lines I draw winds up being the "right" one. I think that I just pay closer attention to what I draw the first time around, I'll save lead and time. Makes sense!

    But I always want to fuss with the lines. When I'm drawing, I always think "I really need to tweak ALL of these. The lines that make up the character's left strand of hair could be 30% more black," or "It doesn't matter what I put down for now...I'll erase it and draw something that makes sense later on." I really need to get out of this mentality! But it is SO ingrained.

    But in the meantime, here are some bunny girls that I have uploaded to my computer/know where they were anyway. Ridiculous ladies in ridiculous poses and costumes with (probably) bad anatomy (ironically?) inspired by the blog "escher girls." Stuff gets in your head.

    Someone mentioned to me that my colors look muddy a lot so I tried to fiddle with that. Also trying to master that elusive smile. Messing with the corners/squintyness of the eyes helps to alter the emotions. Remembering that the cheeks are moving/squishy entities also helps me strive towards believability.

    Also gonna include a doodle I did in my notebook as a reminder/warning to myself. I always do this "thing" where I'll draw something, put it on the computer, flip it, and then realize it looks as skewed as if I had been taking a nap on the far-corner of the paper. From this sketch on, holding things in front of the mirror to examine them is something that's no longer optional for me. I'm seriously disallowing myself from ever overlooking this step ever again. It's so easy and so helpful, but for some reason, I basically never do it. Why not?

    The sketch itself is me trying to do character interaction. Not sure how that went. I feel like the initial gestures that I draw always have more life than anything I try to clean up or ad color too. It was also prompted by one of the weekly themes on IllustrationFriday.com. I definitely don't remember which one. I wanted to try drawing in a softer, kid friendly style.

    And in other news, here's a web toy that's supposed to measure how well you can eyeball. I have no proof that it's actually educational, but it seems plausible that it's possible to learn from it, or at least assess some of your weaknesses.

    There's so much writing in my sketchbook, but I feel like writing down what I learned about helps me internalize it, and I feel like I'm also creating a resource for myself. Big blocks of text do seem somewhat out of place on an art website, but, I kinda like 'em. Still...

    tl;dr: Work on drawing more precisely; it will save time. Smiles move the whole face. Hold things up to mirrors...

    @Royzy;
    Yeah, I really like the Pixellovely one, but for a really long time I couldn't get it to work correctly for me. For whatever obscure reason, the page would always load in my browser as "http://www.pixelovely.com/gesture/figuredrawing.php/" as opposed to "http://www.pixelovely.com/gesture/figuredrawing.php". Apparently, the extra backslash will totally break the website. Go figgies.

    I like your idea of the muscle studies. I'll give it a shot. Thanks.

    @zephyri;

    Well, I wanted to study perspective at the same time because I felt like my pictures didn't have a good sense of depth. Books would talk about "blocking out figures" but there was a limit to how well I could work with blocks. Figures are usually on some kind of plane, but I don't understand planes as well, so it was hard to conceptualize things. I like being able to switch between tasks and relate them to one another, too. Thank you for your comments about the confusing mark making.

    @knut & vineris

    Thank you so much!

    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Amerstburg, Ontario
    Posts
    1,070
    Thanks
    7
    Thanked 429 Times in 415 Posts
    Great studies, and these new pieces are very cute. Keep it up.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Here's a little guy that I made out of clay to help me draw the light on the planes of the faces when I work from imagination. I hope I don't drop him.

    Thank you psychobuddy. I'm gonna try.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    LA
    Posts
    224
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by snacks ex machina View Post
    Royzy- As to that old guy, it's kind of difficult for me to recall everything of what he was saying. He was super verbose, and rather than just stating things outright, he kind of talked around them through metaphors and vague examples. So he would say 30 different things just to make one statement. It's been such a while since I spoke to him too, but I think what he might have been trying to get at was that the underlying structure of an object is different from the surface treatment that you apply to it. So, constructing and rendering (making sure everything is the right color, how the paint blends, etc.) are separate skills. If I see him again, I can ask for further clarification.
    Cool stuff. Love your sketches.

    One thing about line vs rendering, rending is based on light. So, if you have crappy light you have crappy form (an example of crappy light would be front plus multiple fill lights). Line does not have those limitations, it only has form.

    Last edited by jtaart; October 30th, 2012 at 10:15 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Singapore / New Haven, CT
    Posts
    787
    Thanks
    321
    Thanked 351 Times in 323 Posts
    please post more! your hatching is lovely

    Sketchbook

    NaidyBlack SpotEyestrainVK

    “This is [...] where the anvils are made of graphite, the hammers are as true as rectangular marquee selections and the fires burn with the light of a thousand lensflares.” --Jason Rainville
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #20
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    216
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 55 Times in 55 Posts
    hey man i love the clay head! its sucha good idea!

    _____________________
    check out my : SKETCHBOOK: All critiques much needed and WELCOMED!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Thanks you guys!

    I always feel shy about posting. Today it's some more sketches. I feel so lame for 1.neglecting this thing so much and 2.always uploading studies and never posting anything creative. I am lame.

    Today I have some color thingies of mouths and...other things. Nothing ambitious; just trying to make it look nice, I guess. Loving the new uploader/layout.

    Quote Originally Posted by jtaart View Post
    Cool stuff. Love your sketches.

    One thing about line vs rendering, rending is based on light. So, if you have crappy light you have crappy form (an example of crappy light would be front plus multiple fill lights). Line does not have those limitations, it only has form.
    I think that's a lot of what he was saying. I think he mostly cares about forms.

    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Finally got a new tablet, finally got a new scanner and finally got some free time. I am now free to start stankin up the place again. I feel very out of practice. >.<

    For some reason, it feels like it takes a million years to draw anything on a tablet. I don't know if I'll ever get faster.

    Attached Images Attached Images      
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    608
    Thanks
    44
    Thanked 77 Times in 67 Posts
    Some really nice clean work here. I hear you about always wanting to polish lines. That's a habit I can't seem to break either. I'll start off with a self imposed mandate to do touch chicken scratch studies and 3 minutes in I find myself refining lines. I feel your pain

    Slow progress, but progress nonetheless...

    Sketchbook

    Finished Stuff
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    0
    0
    Whoa, it's insane to leave for a while, come back, and then see with new eyes how questionable your art is. I feel like I don't even know what planet I'm living on.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Okay, so I want to be less horrible with the anime so I want to see how this will go. Unpacking some adjectives, trying to focus more on creating a scene and flipping the canvas, so that there are fewer surprises of derped out art.

    One thing that bugs me about some of the other pieces is how bizarre the colors look between monitors. Like, some pieces look totally normal when I'm working with them on one monitor, but then I go and look at them on a CRT or something and they look INSANE in a bad way. I'm not really sure how to deal with this. I guess I should stay away from using really intense/borderline intense color and focus more on creating color relationships instead of turning the saturation on everything up to 11. I could definitely be wrong, but I think I should try it and see if it improves anything.

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  27. #26
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    121
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 23 Times in 19 Posts
    Trying to do CHOW #355-- pirate chef. Drawing is, like, really hard!

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. #27
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,214
    Thanks
    573
    Thanked 409 Times in 407 Posts
    Really enjoying your work so far! I spotted your chef in the CHOW zone, and had to come have a look see. You must produce more creations! Gogogo.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 18

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •