Life? Art? WAHH?

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    394
    Thanks
    249
    Thanked 71 Times in 68 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Life? Art? WAHH?

    Browsing through my art history book Gardner’s Art Through The Ages, I became weary and curious when flipping through the texts I have read and images that I praised by all these great artists such as Brunelleschi, Da Vinci, Titian etc. I truly wondered how learning art at that time felt even though as ridiculous as this may seem O.o, curiosity is a great feeling and it must be explored and felt in a spiritual sense. My view is that life during those past periods must have felt broader and extensive because most artist were not specifically skilled in one craft but multiple i.e. Architect, scientist etc. Most master artists became quite skilled at such an early age but also at the time, the world’s life expectancy wasn’t as high as it is now. I pondered thinking maybe that may be the reason for their skilled traits. They learn quicker simply because people adjust to society, we adapt to the time given to us. I believe time must of felt slower and longer which results in big leaps of progress in any given endeavor at such an early age (sorry if this sounds crazy). In comparison to the modern age, life just feels short and condensed. Days feel like hours, and hours feel like seconds. The amount of distractions from advancing technology and everything around us is great but it is also like poison at times. It distracts people from a goal or perhaps a fulfillment, the meaning of life preferably. Art is such a great remedy for that ailment in my opinion. Even though I have just begun exploring art, I just think it is beautiful how life (time), literature, Nature and almost just about everything is parallel with art and how we perceive of the subject now must have been completely different to past periods.

    What do you guys think?

    If you have a moment, Help me improve with critiques. thank you Sketchbook

    Awesome Sketchbooks
    nim Mechanical Man King Kostas
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Back in the day, people learned "quicker" because they started earlier. Way earlier. Nowadays childhood is prolonged and people don't usually start seriously studying for a career until they reach college age, say seventeen or eighteen...

    Back in the renaissance (and up to the eighteenth century or thereabouts,) people would go off to become apprentices as soon as possible - say as young as nine. And as apprentices, they'd learn hardcore trade skills from day one, no fluffy elementary school easy-learning activities. People now could learn just as soon if they followed the same regimen at the same age, and if you took away their TV and games and Internet...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to QueenGwenevere For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,903 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Definitely (to Queenie's points)...but really worthy ideas to consider TNiznet. Other things to keep in mind those guys were not architects and scientists, doctors, surgeons and engineers as we know them now. They didn't have licenses, degrees and years and years of formal education. They weren't expected to know the capital of Ohio or how to change a tire.

    In many ways it was a more natural approach to life...you had an interest in something, if you were lucky you were apprenticed to someone at a high level in their craft or trade, you learned and grew.

    The sad thing in today's world is you're "educated" until 18...well past many people's natural interest level in something they might really enjoy as a career. They're beat down like a peg until they fit into the round hole.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,540
    Thanks
    46
    Thanked 271 Times in 199 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    In many ways it was a more natural approach to life...you had an interest in something, if you were lucky you were apprenticed to someone at a high level in their craft or trade, you learned and grew.
    Only if you were at least modestly wealthy, which was comparatively rare. For the vast majority of the population, if you had an interest in something, you kept on being a peasant farmer anyways.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Meloncov For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Meloncov View Post
    Only if you were at least modestly wealthy, which was comparatively rare. For the vast majority of the population, if you had an interest in something, you kept on being a peasant farmer anyways.
    Actually, what you did was whatever your parents did. Or whatever your parents decided you should do. Which could mean getting sent out to be an apprentice to your uncle Joe whether you like it or not.

    Unless you're female, in which case you get married off and that's that...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,903 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    if you were lucky you were apprenticed to someone at a high level in their craft or trade, you learned and grew.
    Or if you're lucky people read what you write.

    It might also apply if you showed exceptional aptitude for a given trade, skill or craft.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  12. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Paris
    Posts
    394
    Thanks
    249
    Thanked 71 Times in 68 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Definitely (to Queenie's points)...but really worthy ideas to consider TNiznet. Other things to keep in mind those guys were not architects and scientists, doctors, surgeons and engineers as we know them now. They didn't have licenses, degrees and years and years of formal education. They weren't expected to know the capital of Ohio or how to change a tire.

    In many ways it was a more natural approach to life...you had an interest in something, if you were lucky you were apprenticed to someone at a high level in their craft or trade, you learned and grew.

    The sad thing in today's world is you're "educated" until 18...well past many people's natural interest level in something they might really enjoy as a career. They're beat down like a peg until they fit into the round hole.
    Yes! I definitely agree it must have been a more natural approach to life. I am pretty certain they did not have as much information on art that we do now, so it was more hands on which results in leaps of progress because artists would have had to research their own answers rather than looking for others simply because the art world was developing at the time.

    Thanks for taking your time to read and comment guys!

    If you have a moment, Help me improve with critiques. thank you Sketchbook

    Awesome Sketchbooks
    nim Mechanical Man King Kostas
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook