Essentials of the face?
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    Essentials of the face?

    Hey!

    I am practicing on drawing faces and have been looking on different references. My question is, what features of the face are the most important to focus on getting right? I know we all can tell the difference between faces, but I cannot really grasp the traits in my drawings.

    Thanks!

    Have a nice day!
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    I am an humble beginner so I may be wrong but I study faces right know and I've come to think that all of them are important. The most important is to have the structure right because features are helpless if you have the structure wrong. However, that being said, the eyes are what humans look at first on a face and even a slight mistake on the shape or the form of the eye can break your drawing even if the rest of the face is right.

    Last edited by DeviousMeerkat; June 24th, 2012 at 05:55 AM.
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    The overall shape and proportions are far more important than the details of any one feature.


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    You need to worry more about the planes of the face, how they differ from one another, look for the basic patterns of light and shadow, the overall proportions of the head, treat it as a whole.
    Basically, you should start with the big shapes and add the details last. If it doesn't look right when you lay out the overall shapes of the figure, it will never look right.
    The most important thing is, however, to practice a lot.

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    And after the shapes and proportions, get the values right because they indicate the 3D form of the face.

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    Thanks for reply! So basiaclly the proceedure is to define the shilouette of the face and manage the right proportions between the features before I go into details?

    Have a nice day!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xinga View Post
    Thanks for reply! So basiaclly the proceedure is to define the shilouette of the face and manage the right proportions between the features before I go into details?
    Forget about the silhouette, and learn to construct the head in 3 dimensions. Books like Bridgman and Loomis are helpful here, they show you how to carve a face into a block, or stick its features on an egg.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    Forget about the silhouette, and learn to construct the head in 3 dimensions. Books like Bridgman and Loomis are helpful here, they show you how to carve a face into a block, or stick its features on an egg.

    That's a philosophical position, not an artistic one necessarily. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.
    I can certainly show you very accomplished artists that use a silhouette method.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig D View Post
    That's a philosophical position, not an artistic one necessarily. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.
    I can certainly show you very accomplished artists that use a silhouette method.
    I agree that it depends on the artist's goal, but for representational art I believe that a sound construction is the way to go, at least from an educational point of view. And whichever way you look at it, it has nothing to do with philosophy.

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    Certainly both approaches can be valuable, and I think someone should know enough about both to at least decide what works for them. However when the discussion about the differences reaches 20 pages I think that has definitely gone into philosophy

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=160487

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    The eyes are easily the most important feature IMO. Every time we interact with others, we automatically look at the eyes first, and thus the same concept applies to drawing. With that said, general construction of the face is equally as important as well IMO, as it's easily noticeable when a face is 'off'.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cgaddict View Post
    The eyes are easily the most important feature IMO. Every time we interact with others, we automatically look at the eyes first, and thus the same concept applies to drawing.
    And yet, somehow, we can still recognize people when they are wearing sunglasses .


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    Actually, it's been found that eyebrows contribute more to recognition that eyes... Remove someone's eyebrows, and they become less recognizable than if you cover their eyes.

    And just a point to mention, one thing beginners do a LOT is obsess over getting the eyes right, while neglecting the rest of the face around the eyes... And then they get frustrated because no matter how much they obsess, the eyes persist in looking wrong. And the reason they look wrong is usually because the face around them is wrong.

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    You don't need a face at all to recognise a person.




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    Lemmeguess, your mother, your grandmother and your mother-in-law?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    You don't need a face at all to recognise a person.
    Heck, you don't even need color or lighting.

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    I was surprised years ago when someone pointed out what a small portion of the head is actually face- especially because back then I didn't have a clue what was happening on the rest of the skull, much less how to draw it.

    To me, it's two problems- understanding what's going with the rest of the head- which IMHO is better achieved by sculpting the head than by drawing it- then learning how to represent this larger mass on paper. They're really two separate problems- learning the structure, then learning how to represent that in 2D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    Lemmeguess, your mother, your grandmother and your mother-in-law?
    The queen of England.

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