Anime Drawing (moved from ED&CA)

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  1. #1
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    Anime Drawing (moved from ED&CA)

    I took the idea of 2 pictures and combine them together. Please give comments on improvements. Thanks.

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  3. #2
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    By the way, this is my second drawing.

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  4. #3
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    Ok if your goal is to learn to draw this stuff the first thing you have to do is to not draw this stuff unless you've learned anatomy and proportions REALLY well.

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  6. #4
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    Anatomy.. study anatomy!!

    -We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then, is not an act, but a habit.

    -Some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon 'em.

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  7. #5
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    Okay, thanks a lot for guiding me.

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    You've got a pretty good start here. The largest glaring issues I see (aside from the aforementioned "Anatomy" which can be fudged a little, being stylized artwork,) is that your line art is fairly even throughout the image. Being a graphic style, manga/anime needs more attention paid to lines, they really require varying weight and thickness. Areas that are covered in shadow, or are a denser mass tend to have thicker/heavier lines than areas that are hit by light or have less mass.

    Also, explore some traditional art theories. It is harder to draw stylized figures without a solid foundation. If you don't have live models to draw from, and instructors to learn from, I would suggest PoseSpace.com for reference images of models (though it is a paid resource) as well as checking out some books and/or videos. Some of my favorites are Giovanni Civardi, Burne Hogarth, Andrew Loomis, and Glenn Villipu.

    I'm sure it's not all the help or guidance you were looking for, but I figured it'd be more helpful than a post that says "It needs work."

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  9. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitsu//San View Post
    Ok if your goal is to learn to draw this stuff the first thing you have to do is to not draw this stuff unless you've learned anatomy and proportions REALLY well.
    No. They should attempt regardless and make sure they try to learn those things as they do it. Correcting your own mistakes is a great way to go about these things, because it forces you to internalize the things you need to learn.

    If you ask me, there's never a reason for someone to NOT draw what they want to draw. As long as they work toward improving themselves and fixing their mistakes, they shouldn't postpone the stuff they LIKE drawing just because they're not "good enough" to do it well.

    So, OP, the stuff the other posters have said about your proportions and static lineweight are most certainly true. By the way, given your description, I'm pretty sure you tried to copy two images, correct? You might as well post them.

    Last edited by Psychotime; June 30th, 2012 at 11:20 PM.
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  11. #8
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    Wrong. What would happen if it's the first time you sit on a car and the first thing you have to do is a nascar racing? With drawing it's the same thing, you should learn real proportions and real anatomy (an maybe a proper way to draw from hundreds years of theory) before you start to break anatomy rules drawing manga characters. It's quite simple, if you start to draw things like this you'll never know what rule are you breaking and this will become your standard way to see things. Your brain will associate to a face all those square lines and big and wrong eyes. There are studies about this stuff man, it's not like "do whatever you like to do cause it's fine", of course you can do whatever you want but there are consequences especially in early decisions like this and those consequences can hurt your career A LOT in this field.

    So sure, you can draw and be happy drawing whatever you want and feel, but if you know the basic stuff you're free to break rules and learn something yours.

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    Thing is, while learning anatomy and real proportions is the correct thing to do for one's own sake and future progress, most real manga artists in Japan probably never did that, they really are just copying each other's ideas and using mostly formulaic approaches to draw their characters. This is one reason why even though they have a generally recognizable common style (especially if you narrow your focus on "eras") despite being non-realistic, or why generally character are made with rather simple lines (by western/realistic standards) even if they can be detailed overall.

    Some do know how to really draw like for example Hirohiko Araki or Kentaro Miura and this shows in their art, when they're not imitating on purpose the current mainstream "style".

    Now, I'm not saying that real anatomy and proportion studies should be overlooked if one's focus are manga characters, but doing them will certainly benefit manga drawing, like avoiding "angle lock" (not being able to draw characters in different angles than what one learned - a common problem for manga artists who are seldom able to properly draw their character from low or high angles).

    To the thread opener: do both. Make manga art and real life studies at the same time.
    To give up your main artistic interest just becase you should get getter at drawing realisticly first is #1 demotivator, a trap I fell into a few times too personally.

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    @volcano665 - I don't know if you are feeling this way, but don't get discouraged. I'd like to share a personal story with you. When I was in sixth grade (waaaayyy back in the day) I was interested in the American comic book style of art. Manga hadn't quite secured its hold on the world yet, and Jim Lee, Todd McFarlane, and Rob Liefield were the hottest artists in the business at the time. Impressed by his work, I tried to mimic Jim Lee's style. This essentially carried through my senior year at high school, which was 6 formulative years of drawing in a stylized fashion without developing a solid foundation first.

    While I certainly enjoyed drawing this way (also by this time, I had dabbled in manga style too, which was beginning to grow in popularity by that time, but still nothing close to how it is now) once I got to college, and had life drawing and similar classes, I had to work harder than most of the other students unlearning what I had essentially taught myself. 14 years later, I am still struggling with those issues, as I am working toward becoming a professional concept artist in the gaming industry (a life long dream) but they have little interest in those who cannot render realistically.

    How does this relate to your image? Keep drawing what you love! If you don't intend to do this stuff professionally, just work on what makes you happy. On the flip side, if you ARE wanting to work with art professionally, then keep drawing what makes you happy, but use it as a break and a form of measurement of improvement as you develop and study the necessary foundations.

    @Psychotime - I'd have to agree with your statement. Doing what you love comes first, but it is also important to consider the direction Volcano665 is taking his art in. If it's toward a professional career, wouldn't you say that developing the core skills earlier, rather than having to unlearn everything and essentially start from the ground up later, is a better path?

    @Hitsu//San - Solid advice. IMO, your suggestions would lead to faster growth for Volcano665 than "How to Draw Manga" books and YouTube videos. And your statement about it hurting your career later is definitely "spot-on."

    @s12a - Wow, no. Manga-ka that learn traditionally (as an apprentice) or through the Schooling system in Japan receive a strong focus of life drawing, and traditional rendering methods. For apprentices, they learn under their master, often inking the master's work, and are required to learn realistic anatomy and proportion on their own time. Doujinshi artists are a different case, and come from all kinds of different artistic backgrounds. Stylization tends to come after the fundamentals.

    The reason characters are rendered with "simple lines" is typically because images are printed on colored pages of newsprint, which does not hold detail very well. Think back to 1950's golden and silver age American comics. American comic readers have become somewhat spoiled, with the glossy, higher quality paper, and Photoshop / Painter colored artwork of America's modern comics. Also, "Manga" is considered a very aesthetic style, where often beauty is found in simplicity. You often see this with characters that have gorgeous line art, and then extremely beautiful and well rendered backgrounds. Without an understanding of traditional techniques and solid foundations, such renderings would not be possible. While many things in manga are formulaic, so are traditional techniques, and those employed by modern comic artists.

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    @visioneer: maybe I haven't expressed myself clearly enough. I've written manga artists but I didn't really mean just the accomplished professional ones (manga-ka) who actually make them for a living, but a wider group including amateurs and beginning ones - not only in manga but also in doujinshi and illustrations/concept art - like you can find on DeviantArt or Pixiv (especially). Many of them can make gorgeous art and digital paintings, but are narrowly focused on that typical style because they haven't really studied the "fundamentals" in the traditional sense.

    This happens with american comics (meaning the character style) too, but with manga-styled characters there'so much wiggle room that even without a solid artistic background or vast anatomy knowledge it's possible to make good or even more than good looking, recognizable results given just some personal determination, sufficient basis and reference material.

    Of course, the more one knows in the traditional sense, the better. I just feel it isn't a very strict requirement for general manga-styled drawings and illustrations and this is shown by huge amount of "good-to-look-at" similarly themed work made by people who don't make art for a living. Just my 2 cents.

    I think my previous point for the op still stands anyway: learn the basics AND draw what you like, at the same time.

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  16. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hitsu//San View Post
    Wrong. What would happen if it's the first time you sit on a car and the first thing you have to do is a nascar racing?
    The main difference to your analogy being: it doesn't hurt to fail in drawing. They shouldn't fear failure. You should accept it will happen and learn from your mistakes.

    What they SHOULD be told is that they won't be good at the stuff they like UNLESS they back it up with real knowledge. And that's alot different than saying "stop doing what you like". What's the point of drawing if you aren't allowed to have fun doing it?

    They should be learning AND having fun at the same time. This false dichotomy that you have to choose one or the other is ridiculous.

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  18. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Psychotime View Post
    What they SHOULD be told is that they won't be good at the stuff they like UNLESS they back it up with real knowledge. And that's alot different than saying "stop doing what you like". That's extreme. What's the point of drawing if you aren't allowed to have fun doing it?
    I wholeheartedly agree with this. I made twice in the past years the mistake of giving up drawing what I liked because people who I thought were experienced were telling me I had to "learn anatomy and the basics" before starting drawing "cartoons" and the like. I diligently followed those indications and twice I ended up quickly losing interest in drawing.

    It's very important to not lose track of why you're drawing. If you're never enjoying it at all (even acknowledging that studying and practice can be boring at times), you're going to fail (unless you're very strong willed or enjoy psychological pain).

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  19. #14
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    Ok guys, you are right. But at one condition though, you must draw for fun in your spare time.

    In any other case you intend to apply to your skills (like to find a job or growing up as a concept artist) then you are completely wrong. Of course you must like what you are doing but no one told you that to learn to become good at this stuff is a very difficult lifetime process? I can bet my left hand that everyone you're going to ask that is more than an average artist will tell you that you must work hard as hell to become good. It's not like sit down and draw whatever you feel like and eventually you'll become good at what you're drawing. This happens only in the beginners mind, trust me, i know lots of people that thinks this way an no one of them is nearly good.

    @Visioneer: Thanks man, it happened the same to me anyway and like you i'm still struggling to get rid of bad habits after years of hard work. I know it's hard to understand and to accept though. Volcano told me that he wants to become a concept artist and i hope he's not the only one that could listen to good advices.

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  20. #15
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    You're not saying anything new. The problem is that there are good ways and bad ways to address this amateur mindset. Setting up a sloppy false dichotomy is not a good one.

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  22. #16
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    There are plenty of talented artists who started out drawing creatively then putting in fundamentals and all the nit picky stuff afterwards.

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    Gotta agree with Psychotime, after all: "all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy".
    Though it looks like OP went and deleted their comments and description in this thread?

    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
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  25. #18
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    Guys... I personally thinks that i have a weak foundation, which is the source to my weak drawings. Thats why i am learning the basics now and at the same time draw from time to time on things that i am in interest a little. So i can do what i like and at the same time, check how much i have improved or what i have learned in each drawing i drew after.

    As for someone who mentioned the 2 pictures i took from... I don't have it with me, but one of it was quite famous.Another was a very very hidden picture i found randomly. I tried to remember as many details as possible when i looked at it, then drew it out.

    This is the link for the Sniper girl:-
    http://onlyhdwallpapers.com/wallpape...per-139265.png

    As for the dual D.Eagle girl... I can't find it anymore.

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  26. #19
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    And yes, Anime drawing is my second best i have interest to draw.
    My aim is to be able to draw like those game industries concept artist.
    I recently fell in love with this game's concept art style called Darksiders.
    It's concept art is totally mind blowing me!Everything about it is making me excited.
    From Digital medium concept arts to pencil medium concept arts ( Not sure if it really is pencil but it is most likely to be. ). Besides, I found that God of war's concept art is badly done by the concept artist which is not i am aiming for.
    What i am trying to say here is not the idea of the concept art, but the quality of the work, which is what i am trying to achieve.

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  27. #20
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    Well, you won't improve your skills unless you start again from the basics
    doing life drawings of real objects and people. Anime only looks good
    if the artist has an understanding of weight and form as well as the
    capabilities of a functioning human body.

    I suggest you start a sketchbook thread to help you and us keep
    track of your studies and help you to improve. At this stage anime
    drawings, while fun, will only remain a fun past time and will not
    seriously improve until you have a firmer grasp of the basics.

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  28. #21
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    Star Eater: I am doing the basics currently and also constantly drawing to check if i have improved. I am very very poor, I do not own an i-phone, i-pad, or any i's... Saving money now for digital drawing pad in the coming years.

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  29. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by volcano665 View Post
    I am very very poor, I do not own an i-phone, i-pad, or any i's... Saving money now for digital drawing pad in the coming years.
    Er, your point?

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  30. #23
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    Star Eater: sorry saw the wrong thing. Anyways sketchbook thread is for constantly updating artworks??

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    Quote Originally Posted by volcano665 View Post
    Star Eater: sorry saw the wrong thing. Anyways sketchbook thread is for constantly updating artworks??
    No problem man.

    Not exactly, I mean feel free to update a piece you submit in the crit section.
    A sketchbook is just your own personal thread to put up all your artwork
    and your studies. I use mine to update pieces, but that's your choice.

    It's a good way for people to measure your progress and get to know you
    by checking out your sketchbook while you visit and comment in theirs.

    It gives motivation to draw and update it.

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    I like the line quality alot, and the attention to details in terms of the definition of the design. If I have to point things out, it would be to construct your drawings more, so that you know exactly what the volumes are in space. So if I was doing this drawing, I would actually draw them without clothes first, then layer on top the clothes. There is indeed some anatomical problems, like others pointed out. I wouldn't say that you should go and study individual muscles, but maybe try drawing from Andrew Loomis' books, or say, Naruto, or photos, just to get some of the curves of the legs, and their proportions, correct. Right now they look a bit off, and a bit flat.

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    Thanks for the comment and advice. Currently working on that now.

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