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Thread: Finding Art Style

  1. #1
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    Finding Art Style

    Currently I'm beginning all over again with the basics. So basically my question is when is the right time to find your own art style?? Is it after when I learn basics drawing. Form/Shape etc ? Or does time usually determine later on what style is your own. Not sure if anyone asked this, but if there is another thread about art styles please post
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    You don't find a style. It finds you. Like Soviet Russia.

    In other words, stop worrying about it, get better at drawing since that's how it ends up finding you.
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    Damn it Arshes, you said what I was gonna say...

    Don't worry about "finding your style". Genuine style is something that evolves naturally out of who you are, your tastes, your accumulated experience, etc. Anything else is just icing on the cake.

    And if you're a beginner, the last thing you need to worry about is "style". It's so easy to fall into limiting gimmicks in the name of "style", especially if you don't quite know what you're doing yet.

    (There have actually been multiple threads on this topic, but I can't locate them at the moment, sorry... Someone else will probably dig some up.)
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    @Arshes Nei Thank you thats what I needed to know I'll keep on drawing then, until my art style finds me

    @QueenGwenevere: Awesome, thanks for the advice. Just what I was searching for and I'll keep that in mind!
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    When your a beginner, you shouldn't worry about style if your wanting to create realism pictures. You probably want to focus on getting your skill level up to looking as naturalistic as possible.

    Stylizing your work is simply making changes to your references that's consistent in all your pictures. Look at the first picture in this link from Norman Rockwell.

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=123346

    Rockwell wrote:
    This is a photograph and my drawing of it made with the help of the bolopticon (projector). I have made some seemingly slight changes in doing the drawing but these changes will mean a lot when I do the finished drawing with the help of this outline. The skill and taste which you use in making such changes represents your own personal feeling and helps to make your work distinctive and your own. Never try to be different just to be different or just for effect and never try to create a superficial style. Feel intensely what you draw or paint. Then your work will automatically take on your distinctive personality and will be recognized as yours and only yours. I used an HB Wolff pencil on this.
    The definition of style is:
    style/stīl/
    Noun: A manner of doing something.
    Verb: Design or make in a particular form.
    It's understanding design that helps you stylize. Look at this link...

    http://www.essential-humanities.net/supplementary-art-articles/realism-vs-stylization/


    There are plenty of areas in art where someone's job is figuring out how to make a particular style. Like model sheets for an animated character. The character is "stylized". Or comic books for another example. When artist that became comic book artist, they weren't drawing from nature and their natural style happened to look like comic book art.
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    While it's definitely true that your art style will find you, if you want to help it along, something you can do while you are practicing is make a folder on your computer and, every time you come across a piece of work by an artist in a style you like, save it to that folder - it will be your little "inspiration" corner. You may want to print them and make a real-world folder too. The styles you are drawn to will probably be similar to the style which is "you", and when you are doing work for yourself, you might examine some of these pieces and ask yourself why the artists chose to do things in a certain way.

    It's OK to draw stuff which is stylised so long as you ALSO do studies of realism and understand how they depend upon one another (that is, that stylised work is based upon realism and an understanding of anatomy, perspective etc is required to do stylised work well). If you prefer to draw in a stylised way, this may make the process more enjoyable for you and help you understand the reasoning behind your more realistic studies.

    Good luck!
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    @Bowlin Thank u! The links helped ALOT! especially rockwells quote Guess I'll have to keep studying and keep drawing.

    @Birkeley Awesome Idea, I'll do that to inspire me more. I'll keep that in mind as im drawing along the way. Thank you!
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    An opportunity to bring up Robert Henri! I can't miss this...

    "Don't worry about your originality. You couldn't get rid of it even if you wanted to. It will stick with you and show up for better or worse in spite of all you or anyone else can do."

    Like others have said, your style will develop with time. Charting your interests and the art you like can help you explore the designs and techniques that are uniquely you. Your style will change with you over the years, too. It's never really "found" or "finished..." it just is.

    Something I'd like to point out, because this never occurred to me when I was a beginning artist worried about "style"--style is much more than what proportions you use or how cartoony you make people. It's technique, color schemes, subject matter, mood, shapes... everything you put on the page. Indeed, "style" is even what kind of page you use! Digital canvas, cloth, walls, skin?

    So go out, explore, and try out what you like to see in art! Your style will come with time.
    For the meanwhile, you should focus on technical skills and drawing realistically. But you can play sometimes, too.
    Have fun!
    My sketchbook - come critique me!
    jesse martel@tumblr
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    "Style is nothing more than an illustrator's short-hand, and like any short-hand, once you learn how to write, you'll learn how to edit your subject to fit how you wish to say what you want."

    -OmenSpirits
    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
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  17. #10
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    @JesseM:Amazing thank you for that, I need all the advice I can get! Time to explore

    @OmenSpirits: Awesome quote! Gotta save that for later Thanks!
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    Man, I love that Henri quote.
    Here's a line that been kicking around the SVA Illustration/Cartooning department forever (originally attributed to Joe Orlando, I think): "style is the mistakes you make that other people don't."

    Tristan Elwell
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  20. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Man, I love that Henri quote.
    Here's a line that been kicking around the SVA Illustration/Cartooning department forever (originally attributed to Joe Orlando, I think): "style is the mistakes you make that other people don't."
    Kelly Freas would always say a similar thing when asked about style

    "Style is your inability to record things exactly as you envision them."


    Robert Henri had another great quote about style

    "Brush strokes carry a message whether you will it or not. The stroke is just like the artist at the time he makes it. All the certainties, all the uncertainties, all the bigness of his spirit and all the littleness are in it. "
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  22. #13
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    I wouldn't worry about it. It'll come by itself, even if you end up trying to emulate someone else's style.
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