Portfolio review/feedback

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  1. #1
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    Portfolio review/feedback

    Hello

    my name is Reem, i am a graduate in London, Uk
    i am looking for a a permenant job in the games industry, but before applying i need to know if my portfolio is good enough..

    this is the link to my portfolio
    www.twistedxmind.com


    please if you check out my work and have anything to say, ANYTHING id appriciate it
    if you want to be brutal i dont mind, tell me what you think honestly, but please be constructive

    anyone can comment, professionals and beginners

    Thank you very much

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  3. #2
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    What do you want to do? 3D? Concept art? Animation?

    You can't be good at everything, especially not when you start. It's good that you are versatile, but your stuff isn't up to snuff, so maybe you need to concentrate on something.

    The concept art is not BAD but it's not pro either, it has loads of anatomy issues. The last piece with the 2 weird manga guys doesn't fit. The 3d starfish and gasmask are the best pieces, your humans have anatomy issues, especially in the shoulders. I would get rid of the animation reel, it brings everything else down.

    So I guess if I were you, I'd do some new human models and make sure to start them from sound designs that have good anatomy. Why not start them from photos? Just take front side and back pics of someone you know and make them into 3d models?

    I'm being blunt, but I think you have worked hard so far so you just need to push a little more in these areas. Start with 3d, there is work in that, and when that's good enough for you to get a job, you can branch out.

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  5. #3
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    hi

    thank you so much for the comment..

    i noticed that alot of companies/studios want people that know 2D and 3D and i want to do a bit of both, i was hoping my works show that i can work on both 3d and 2d softwares..

    As for the anatomy , i will try hard to improve..

    again thank you

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    In order to show that you can handle photoshop, I would include the unwraped texture next to your models as well as a wireframe. It also shows that you can do clean unwraps and not whackjob skins with pieces all over the place. Knowing both 2d and 3d is good, but only if what you do with them is of professional caliber. I think your modeling is what's closest to professional and is mostly held back by the references you use when modeling.

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  8. #5
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    Also, I would get rid of all illustration pieces in the portfolio except your 8-10 best. Then work work on on the 3d and make that the focus. It still shows versatility, but it gets rid of the weakest links.

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  10. #6
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    getting rid of all the illustrations?? im not really sure about that

    but ill try harder , thank u again

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    "-Except your 8-10 best."
    Read carefully. This is sound advice.

    "Three's so little room for error."--Elwell
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    Also btw, some of these you can combine. I see no point in having 3 separate images of a turnaround of the same character. Piece it together as one image

    You can also do the same for the masks and such. Some of your illustrations you can do the same if they seem rather void (lots of negative space) like sketches or single illustrations.

    I'm sure by doing that it will help you narrow down how many pieces to keep too.

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  14. #9
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    In your concepts, try to study your subject more, use references, from life, from photo's, shoot your own too. Because your drawings and paintings are clearly better when you draw from life in comparison to your concept work (I don't know if you use references in your concepts, but I'll assume you don't).

    You said you want a full time job. but until you get one, are you drawing everyday on your fundamentals? Because I see that your work is very inconsistent, In some illustrations the proportions of the figures are way off, others you've made a better work.

    From what I learned, pros need to be pretty consistent with their skills, and you are not there yet. But you can be, if you try hard.

    So, don't forget to use references to improve your work. It's very important, specially when your starting out. You should first draw the general mood of illustration from imagination and only after you've got a pretty good grasp of the final image, then, and only then, you get reference according to the previous studies you've done.

    Hey, I'm a beginner so don't mind me too much. Keep it up.

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    i do use refrences in concept but i depend more on what i imagine...but ill keep that in mind

    some drawing are better than the others because some of them i had to finish in less than 30 mins and others i took the time i needed to finish

    thank you all, that was very helpful

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    If you can admit that some pieces are better than others and you are unsatisfied with some of your pieces, then theres only one thing you can, and should do. Take them from your portfolio.
    Put only your best pieces. If it turns out to be only a few, then do more.
    Quantity does not equal quality, you should worry more about quality. This is true for every single job that needs a portfolio.

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  18. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by twisted_mind View Post
    some drawing are better than the others because some of them i had to finish in less than 30 mins and others i took the time i needed to finish
    I agree with what has already been said about your work. I just want to point out that people judge your ability based on your worst piece. If you don't have the time to do it justice then don't put it in your portfolio.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shorinji_Knight View Post
    I agree with what has already been said about your work. I just want to point out that people judge your ability based on your worst piece. If you don't have the time to do it justice then don't put it in your portfolio.
    I agree with this. If you're not satisfied with a piece, why would a potential employer like it?
    any piece you have that you like, but you think you can improve, improve it and then consider putting it in your portfolio.
    8-10 pieces is a good number for illustration. Employers don't want to sift through lots and lots of images. They're busy, and many studios get lots of applications all the time.

    Having said that- the very first image on your portfolio is a man with a ball-gag in his mouth. I found this to be completely distasteful.
    what is the first impression you want someone to have?
    Unless you are only applying to jobs with purely adult content, you should reconsider this first image.
    likewise with the URL - twisted mind.
    Okay, so my first impression of you is that you're twisted and into bondage.
    You're personal work folder is full of bondage, drowning people, and a lot of running mascara.
    overall it's very intimidating. Personal work isn't professional work.
    Ideally, you want a portfolio that will appeal to a wide audience. If the production manager is a 45 year old mother of 2 - she has to like your portfolio well enough to pass it on to the director, or art director.

    I like you're from life section of your portfolio, especially the animals. They show you have diversity, and can create something that isn't creepy.

    studios want people that know 2D and 3D
    Know what aspects of these programs? You still haven't said if you're looking at animation, concept art....

    If you want to be an animator I would look for pre-rigged characters and focus on improving your animation. Forget design, modeling, rigging until you have a solid grasp of timing, and movement.

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    i agree with all of you
    but what i meant by i didnt have enough time to draw them is, it was in a session that i had to draw something very fast and i posted them because i think i did a job in drawing something like that in less than 30 mins

    and about the style, or the name..well this is my personality, i wanted to inflect that in my website because it is mine,, and i think it oes show that besides creepy twisted things, i can do more like you said the animals for example

    im not an animator, i do have an animation reel , yes , but if you read my bio then you will see that i am not an animator , just a modeller because i do not think i am a good animator to be honest..

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  21. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by twisted_mind View Post
    and about the style, or the name..well this is my personality, i wanted to inflect that in my website because it is mine,, and i think it oes show that besides creepy twisted things, i can do more like you said the animals for example
    You said in your first post that you are looking for your first job and you want that to be in the games industry. For a first job they really aren't looking for you to have a really distinct personality. They just want to know that you have the skills to do what they want you to do.

    So only put in your very best work, and leave out work that is a personal exploration of your dreams or etc. You've been given really good advice above by people working in the field you want to be in. Take it.

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    i appriciate your help , thank you

    there is one more thing , do i keep my drawings in sections like they are now? or put them all together in one gallery?

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    Quote Originally Posted by twisted_mind View Post
    there is one more thing , do i keep my drawings in sections like they are now? or put them all together in one gallery?
    Well, at least try to lessen the clicks needed to see the art (two clicks is much, with most professional artists you have art almost immediately visible, at least through thumbnails) and separate them properly. Like why are all the sections under "illustration" when they don't have that much to do with actual illustrations (as in personally I expect to see something like book illustration under that)? Why are the actual stuff you've done for other people under "others" that tells nothing (or at least is pretty damn vague)? What if an employer actually wants to find the art you mention doing in your CV? Don't make it hard to find.

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  24. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by TinyBird View Post
    Well, at least try to lessen the clicks needed to see the art (two clicks is much, with most professional artists you have art almost immediately visible, at least through thumbnails) and separate them properly. Like why are all the sections under "illustration" when they don't have that much to do with actual illustrations (as in personally I expect to see something like book illustration under that)? Why are the actual stuff you've done for other people under "others" that tells nothing (or at least is pretty damn vague)? What if an employer actually wants to find the art you mention doing in your CV? Don't make it hard to find.
    to be honest i thought categorizing things will be easier :/
    by (others) i meant things i've done that are not concept art and they are not personal work (by personal i mean something i painted when i had free time)
    they were kind of commissions ..

    so i think i should put them all together ??? with seperating the categories you mean??
    im sorry if im asking too much, but i know employers look at how arranged the portfolio is, not only the work...

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