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Thread: I think I've just about lost it....

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    Angry I think I've just about lost it....

    I honestly don't have a clue anymore. I start a digital painting usually by either a line drawing or values, which usually get no further. I'm still practicing, but I'm just dead frustrated with how little ability I have. I've been doing digital stuff now for a few months, and I am sick at seeing so many others producing incredible work when I'm struggling to get things like composition sorted. I don't know if It's because I don't spend long enough, try hard enough, know enough etc...probably a combination of all, but I just can't develop. Can anyone else give me their stories of how it took them to develop skills, and how well they could paint when they first started?

    Yes, this is probably extremely irritating to everyone here, but I need some advice on developing, could anyone suggest any books/ sites or videos about basics, or any threads on here for complete and utter spanners like myself. Thanks
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom94 View Post
    I honestly don't have a clue anymore. I start a digital painting usually by either a line drawing or values, which usually get no further. I'm still practicing, but I'm just dead frustrated with how little ability I have. I've been doing digital stuff now for a few months, and I am sick at seeing so many others producing incredible work when I'm struggling to get things like composition sorted. I don't know if It's because I don't spend long enough, try hard enough, know enough etc...probably a combination of all, but I just can't develop. Can anyone else give me their stories of how it took them to develop skills, and how well they could paint when they first started?

    Yes, this is probably extremely irritating to everyone here, but I need some advice on developing, could anyone suggest any books/ sites or videos about basics, or any threads on here for complete and utter spanners like myself. Thanks
    http://conceptart.org/forums

    Seriously. And sorry, don't know where you got the idea this was easy? And that all those "others producing incredible work" have only spent a few months at it? That's like saying I've had my guitar since February...I'm so frustrated I'm not opening for Rush! What, oh what am I doing wrong?

    Here's my story...been at it 48 years as far as I can tell...work at some aspect of it every day....7 days a week. Still suck at some things...struggle with everything. When I got started painting properly about 15 years ago...I couldn't even make a painting.
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    http://conceptart.org/forums

    Seriously. And sorry, don't know where you got the idea this was easy? And that all those "others producing incredible work" have only spent a few months at it? That's like saying I've had my guitar since February...I'm so frustrated I'm not opening for Rush! What, oh what am I doing wrong?

    Here's my story...been at it 48 years as far as I can tell...work at some aspect of it every day....7 days a week. Still suck at some things...struggle with everything. When I got started painting properly about 15 years ago...I couldn't even make a painting.
    Yup. What Jeff said.

    Check out the tutorials in my sig.

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    Send a message to everyone, whose work you like and ask for advice concerning motivation or technique.

    You will be amazed how open and friendly people are.

    Also research a bit and see if you can find a track back to the beginnings of those you admire. Read biographies too(not only of artists, there are a lot of interesting people with interesting jobs who stumbled a lot) It will give you your motivation and drive back when you doubt yourself.

    For example:
    Listen to the Brad Rigney interview on youtube. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mEU03Q5H5sU
    Then view his work on deviant art.

    And don't forget to get some time for yourself.
    Getting up and run for a hour in the morning or evening keeps not only your body fit, but also your mind. It is medicine against getting into a melancholic state of mind.

    all the best,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom94 View Post
    Yes, this is probably extremely irritating to everyone here, but I need some advice on developing, could anyone suggest any books/ sites or videos about basics, or any threads on here for complete and utter spanners like myself. Thanks
    In times of trouble, go back to basics. Set up a simple black and white value study, in charcoal, or a simple still life, in natural media. I still do basic color studies every once in a while (like the last one here), 1-2 hours of digital painting, just to get the colours right, and to tell myself I don't thoroughly suck
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom94 View Post
    I honestly don't have a clue anymore. I start a digital painting usually by either a line drawing or values, which usually get no further. I'm still practicing, but I'm just dead frustrated with how little ability I have. I've been doing digital stuff now for a few months, and I am sick at seeing so many others producing incredible work when I'm struggling to get things like composition sorted. I don't know if It's because I don't spend long enough, try hard enough, know enough etc...probably a combination of all, but I just can't develop. Can anyone else give me their stories of how it took them to develop skills, and how well they could paint when they first started?

    Yes, this is probably extremely irritating to everyone here, but I need some advice on developing, could anyone suggest any books/ sites or videos about basics, or any threads on here for complete and utter spanners like myself. Thanks
    I was in your shoes when I was 18. I dropped out of college to solve my problem of developing and got private lessons to learn how to draw. I did not know I was incapable of making a successful drawing until I finished a few projects. I was missing essential threshold concepts about picture making that held me back from doing solid work. When I grasped those concepts, I could practice more deliberately and this is where I was able to make real progress. Some concepts were obvious but ignored at first. When I finally considered them my work improved. I studied for some time since then (years) and I am still learning. I believe time spent practicing under misconceptions was the most debilitating part of my growth.

    I looked at your sketchbook and can see why you are frustrated. In my opinion, it seems you are trying to make complex pictures with very little know how of the concepts that make those pictures successful. You do not have much to work with and your compounding this problem by attempting things beyond your capabilities. Change your attention then with grasping the fundamental concepts that representational pictures all share in order to be successful. That is without mastering them, pictures would probably look like yours. You will be glad you did.
    - Kinjark
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    Yeah, I second eezacque. Do some studies from life. If you can't do them then now is the time to start. And if you *can* do them they tend to cheer you up because they look better than stuff one tries to make up wholesale.

    This might be a useful thread for you too:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=178582
    Knowing how to approach learning is really useful.
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    Hi, I have checked your sketchbook and you have some sense with value but you lack knowledge in perspective and proportions. What I would advise you to do is to learn to draw. Maybe if I explain a little how I progressed in my art it could help you.

    I started learning digital painting 3 years ago. I wanted to be able to paint very well so I thought that learning painting was the best way to go without trying to draw as that was not as fun as painting for me then years passed and I learned to copy photos and make them look ok but when I tried to paint from scratch I saw little improvement and then I realized that I lacked all the proportions, perspective and knowledge of form that drawing gives you so I bought a sketchbook and began to draw nearly every day in it. At first, only studies of anatomy, vehicle, environments(which were very bad at start) etc and then I started including some personal work. It helped me understand many things in painting and develop my visual library.

    To answer your question, nobody can draw or paint when they start, it's only a matter of time and hard work.

    If you want some advices, you should check noah bradley's blog:

    http://www.noahbradley.com/blog/

    You should also check Bobby Chiu's videos on youtube. He is very inspiring :

    http://www.youtube.com/user/digitalbobert
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    Well..
    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    The main thing is to get as good as you can with drawing and painting fundamentals, and for that you can (and probably should) use any regular traditional media.

    Also "knocking out speed paintings" is probably not the best way to hone your fundamentals. I'm not sure what stage you're at or what you've been doing so far, but the most helpful thing you can do is draw and paint a lot of stuff from life, and do so carefully, paying attention to proportion, form, value, relationships, color, etc. This isn't a speed contest, at the beginning it's usually better to go slow and pay attention and try to get things right. Speed comes with practice.

    Also study the usual basics, anatomy, perspective, and so forth. (The stickies in this forum, the Fine Art forum, and the Tutorials forum have a lot of useful resources and info to get you started on fundamentals.)

    Aaaaand, yeah, start a sketchbook thread and start posting WIPs in the critique section to get some specific feedback and critique.
    Also looking through your sketchbook, I might suggest ditching the special charcoal brush or whatever you're using for a while. It may make the image look prettier but it may also impede your own markmaking, causing you to rely to the brush to do the work for you and overall just make your images an overtextured blur of brushes.
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    How about going back and following the advice you got (like QueenGuinevere's above) the last time?

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    It's only been a month since your last crisis and you're already freaking out about progress...? Seriously? This stuff takes time to learn. A lot of time. Years and years. Patience.

    Also, I don't see any observational drawings in your sketchbook. Have you been drawing anything from life? The more you draw and observe from life, the more progress you make, trust me. (And look carefully at what you're drawing when you draw from life - don't just bang stuff out to get "pencil mileage".)

    I drew a mix of things from life and imagination for many years before going to art school, that got me to the point of being at least good enough to get into a good art school. Then in art school they had us draw exclusively from life for a year, and I think I made huge leaps in skill that year. They continued to have us do a mix of things from life, imagination, and assorted reference for three more years, and I guess I progressed pretty well over that time. Even with that, I was only "pretty good" by the time I graduated. It takes most people several years of further continuous practice after their initial education to become really amazing.

    I kind of slacked some years, and spent the majority of my art time working from imagination or doing cartoony and stylized stuff as part of my job, so now I find myself going back to basics yet again in an effort to level up... Yes, that means lots of studies from life. Basic still life, landscape, life drawing, the works. I've been finding that if you keep doing work from life, you stay in shape. If you stop doing it, it shows.
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    Please listen to every single answer people have given you, they're bloody wise. I know what you're feeling because I'm a beginner as well and I improve very slowly, but that's they way it works. Hard work and patience. I also hoped to become "good" in about half a year (what a fool!) and now I know it could take me at least 3 or 4 years to become as good as I want to be (I don't want to be the next Caravaggio, of course, I just want to paint digitally quite decently).
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    dude you have the same problem i did, and while im gonna tell you what already others did i am gonna say this, WORK YOUR ASS OFF on basics they are the backbone of any artists i know its frustrating everytime you have a idea that you just cant put into paper but in time this things will resolve in the mean time practice alot of structure and mainly always try to draw what you know you cant because even if its bad you are going to learn so much from it, study anatomy, learn gesture drawing feed your mind with all of these things and remember, it takes TIME AND EFFORT to become great but we are all here to give you the support you need from a fellow struggler i salute you !
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