DnD fanart lighting question
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    DnD fanart lighting question

    I'm not exactly sure what kind of lighting I'm trying to achieve here, so if anyone have a suggestion or critique feel free to drop in.
    I wanted to get a horror feel but don't want it to be too dark.
    I tested the painting with torch light but didn't like the red hot feel, preferring cold blue or green.
    I tested with green luminescent cave fungi but didn't like the result, or actually, I'm not sure, how hard/strong should the light cast be? Should everything be covered with the hue of the light source or should there be some of the local color left? If the light isn't strong enough, will there be anything visible?

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    I'd do 10-15 thumbnails in black and white to check different light settings. There are plenty of things in D&D that be a light source. Mind flayer's eyes can glow, there can be energy in the air, or coming out of the guy's mouth. It's a fantasy setting, let your mind wander.

    In traditional terms, high contrast lighting from the bottom creates an eerie and horror feel.

    Here's a good book to check out: Colour and Light by James Gurney.

    Hope this helps

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thoolhoo View Post
    I'd do 10-15 thumbnails in black and white to check different light settings. There are plenty of things in D&D that be a light source. Mind flayer's eyes can glow, there can be energy in the air, or coming out of the guy's mouth. It's a fantasy setting, let your mind wander.

    In traditional terms, high contrast lighting from the bottom creates an eerie and horror feel.

    Here's a good book to check out: Colour and Light by James Gurney.

    Hope this helps
    I already read the book, and studied from any reference photos I can get, but looking back, I guess the main problem here (before how the lighting effects the object), is because I wasn't sure what kind of lighting I want in the first place.
    I want to limit the option based on what can actually happen in a DnD setting, I don't want to have just some random source of light. There's luminescent fungi in the Underdark setting so that's why I chose that or a torch. Maybe I should research some more.
    Experimenting with the thumbnail is an awesome idea though. I stopped my thumbnails at composition sketch and went directly to color after that. Should've been easier to figure it out in black and white.
    Thank you so much!

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    You don't need to make the entire picture too dark, but you do need more contrast. Right now, it's looking very washed out, and your colours are way too saturated and unaffected by the colour of the light. Skin, for example, tends to take on an almost grey tone when affected by blue light (or, if it's strong enough, straight-up blue.) The red, too, is way too saturated to be affected by a cool light source. Try looking at some movie lighting. Blade Runner comes to mind as an example with a whole lot of cool light.

    You don't necessarily need to have the light source explicit in the picture, either, so long as it makes sense for it to be off-screen somewhere. Not so sure about your composition now, though. I agree with Thoolhoo that going back to thumbnails will do you some good right now; it's hard to try out different lighting once you've got to this point in rendering. Also, the way the whole picture is basically cut in half by a diagonal curve, the two melding into one figure... since the mind flayer is nomming on the guy's head, yeah, there's going to be overlap, but there might be a clearer and/or more interesting way to pose them.

    If you do keep going, get some lighting reference for the guy, especially his head. I really don't think the lights and shadows are falling correctly. Whatever you decide to do, pump up the drama a bit. Quick paintover:



    Last edited by Revidescent; June 13th, 2012 at 02:20 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Revidescent View Post
    You don't need to make the entire picture too dark, but you do need more contrast. Right now, it's looking very washed out, and your colours are way too saturated and unaffected by the colour of the light. Skin, for example, tends to take on an almost grey tone when affected by blue light (or, if it's strong enough, straight-up blue.) The red, too, is way too saturated to be affected by a cool light source. Try looking at some movie lighting. Blade Runner comes to mind as an example with a whole lot of cool light.
    Yeah, about that grey tone. I started out with blue/green monochrome when I color it and added the color in little by little because I didn't want it to be all blue. It got more and more saturated as it went on. I had the same problem creating an underwater scene. I never like it when it's too monochrome or desaturated, but put too much color and it looks cartoony.
    Sometimes I found the correct reference, but didn't like it, so I try to find a way around it.

    I'm not planning to continue this one. I'll try again in a different pic.
    Thank you.

    Last edited by Pegahoul; June 13th, 2012 at 01:56 PM.
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