Copying animation roughs and stuff

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  1. #1
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    Copying animation roughs and stuff

    This seems to be a touchy subject but I plan on doing a lot of copying and am getting conflicting advice from people so I am just looking for some advice.

    I have been collecting some Disney and Pixar art of books and plan on doing loads of copying from them and have this on preorder http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1...ls_o00_s00_i00 I have already done a few shitty copies on my sketchbook and I do feel like they are helping. I also want to copy a lot from Skillful Huntsman and books like that. I am going to be spending many hours on this and I need to make sure I'm not just training myself on just getting good at copying.

    Doing life drawing classes 5 days a week would be ideal but I am limited to one day a week at the moment. I am also studying Vilppu and other training material as much as I can.

    Does anyone know if people like Glen Keane or Adreas Deja would have sat down and just copied the roughs of the 9 old men for hours or was it not really like that?

    Obviously it wont hurt and I should just draw everything and draw things from my room and from life in general which I of course plan on doing but I have a full time job and need to know my time is being well spent if I am going to be spending hours on copying.

    Last edited by Whirly; June 12th, 2012 at 08:21 AM.
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  3. #2
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    you need to express a difference between copying and templates...

    templates are a great way to derive animations and anatomy from more esteemed sources like the Animator's Survival Guide, giving you what walk cycles and run cycles look like on very basic figures, allowing you to identify the body movements and work your own creations around them.

    additionally i used to teach myself anatomically correct poses by tracing my own style of construction lines over stock model photographs and the like.

    Copying is prettimuch absolutely okay in my books so long as it's used for learning and you never pass someone elses work (even if you made the whole image still taking another's work counts) as your own for personal gain.
    (look up 'tracing' on encyclopedia dramatica if you cannot grasp such a concept or want a good laugh)

    in the same manner that noone should be impressed that someone can recreate dragonball z characters from iconic poses of said character, but maybe you can learn something from such an exercise.

    but i'm assuming you aren't completely incapable of understanding the morality of this situation so i say go right ahead with learning by whatever means necessarily


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    Depends on what you call copying.

    If you just trace the lines dumbly, it is going to be useless.

    If you try to understand WHY the original animator made this or that line, and what purpose it serves in the drawing, and then make your own version while trying to think like that animator, it is going to be useful.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Whirly View Post
    I am going to be spending many hours on this and I need to make sure I'm not just training myself on just getting good at copying.
    They are very particular stylized figures. Copying them will help you get better at drawing that particular type of figures. If that's the type of figures you find interesting, them draw them. If you like the stylized figures of Michael Whelan, then draw them too. Even though illustrators figures might look SO realistic, they are still stylized. Draw all the stylized figures that appeal to you!

    Draw all these stylized figures and try to do inbetween drawings of them. This way you'll learn how to use references.

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    Well... if you wish to learn, be critical of what you are doing with yourself. review is difficult but totally possible... continuously test yourself with your new knowledge, even if halfway through your test going back to copying references, just keep in mind you're attempting to become independent from any outside help.


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    Thanks a lot for all your help I get what you are saying. Will report back on this if anything occurs to me while I am working. Its becoming more and more apparent as I think about it how important supplementing with drawing from life is. It simply must take precedence.

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    glad to hear, i'm a 3rd year animator myself, often and happy to help out wherever i can


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    Quote Originally Posted by Whirly View Post
    This seems to be a touchy subject but I plan on doing a lot of copying and am getting conflicting advice from people so I am just looking for some advice.

    I have been collecting some Disney and Pixar art of books and plan on doing loads of copying from them and have this on preorder http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1...ls_o00_s00_i00 I have already done a few shitty copies on my sketchbook and I do feel like they are helping. I also want to copy a lot from Skillful Huntsman and books like that. I am going to be spending many hours on this and I need to make sure I'm not just training myself on just getting good at copying.

    Doing life drawing classes 5 days a week would be ideal but I am limited to one day a week at the moment. I am also studying Vilppu and other training material as much as I can.

    Does anyone know if people like Glen Keane or Adreas Deja would have sat down and just copied the roughs of the 9 old men for hours or was it not really like that?

    Obviously it wont hurt and I should just draw everything and draw things from my room and from life in general which I of course plan on doing but I have a full time job and need to know my time is being well spent if I am going to be spending hours on copying.
    Many jobs in animation may require you to draw 'on model', so being able to draw someone else's design is a GOOD thing. HOWEVER.

    I took a look at your sketchbook and you're not really utilizing solid construction techniques, which means the form is breaking down. Even though animation relies heavily on line, you still need to understand form in order to indicate it in a minimal fashion. (And to understand how forms turn in space)

    So while you deconstruct animation drawings (some of which can be heavier on gesture rather than construction) you should continue observational drawing - including objects. Otherwise you're not learning how to draw, you're just learning how to draw exactly what's in front of you. Make sense?

    http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2006/...struction.html

    http://johnkcurriculum.blogspot.com/

    http://andreasdeja.blogspot.com/

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alice Herring View Post
    Many jobs in animation may require you to draw 'on model', so being able to draw someone else's design is a GOOD thing. HOWEVER.

    I took a look at your sketchbook and you're not really utilizing solid construction techniques, which means the form is breaking down. Even though animation relies heavily on line, you still need to understand form in order to indicate it in a minimal fashion. (And to understand how forms turn in space)

    So while you deconstruct animation drawings (some of which can be heavier on gesture rather than construction) you should continue observational drawing - including objects. Otherwise you're not learning how to draw, you're just learning how to draw exactly what's in front of you. Make sense?

    http://johnkstuff.blogspot.com/2006/...struction.html

    http://johnkcurriculum.blogspot.com/

    http://andreasdeja.blogspot.com/
    Thanks a lot for this I am really trying my best to concentrate on construction when I copy but obviously I am still a beginner so I am clearly struggling. So you suggest doing lots of life drawing and still drawing lots of objects in my room to improve this? I have also been studying Vilppu a lot recently. I will check out links (Andreas' site is my favorite art blog )

    If there is anything else you can think of that will improve my construction feel free to let me know but I guess Il get back to drawing lots from life.

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  12. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Whirly View Post
    Thanks a lot for this I am really trying my best to concentrate on construction when I copy but obviously I am still a beginner so I am clearly struggling. So you suggest doing lots of life drawing and still drawing lots of objects in my room to improve this? I have also been studying Vilppu a lot recently. I will check out links (Andreas' site is my favorite art blog )

    If there is anything else you can think of that will improve my construction feel free to let me know but I guess Il get back to drawing lots from life.
    Yes. Use construction. even when you don't want to. MAKE yourself start with simpler shapes. draw axis 'around' the shapes, draw through the form. If you're looking at a finished animation cel/painting, you need to try and deconstruct the form using construction rather than drawing the contour. Don't add detail until you've got the forms nailed down. If you don't already have it, Preston Blair's Cartoon Animation is a great start.

    It's okay to start with simple items like cups, bowls, boxes, etc; as you get better you can move to more complex items. That way you're laying the foundation for good drawing, rather than jumping into something complex. (John K. has a great suggestion about trying to draw from toys, since they already have simplified forms AND will help you think about drawing around the form rather than copying from a 2d image.)

    EDIT:

    p.s. don't get discouraged, it's going to take hundreds+ drawings to get better. It might help once you realize a drawing isn't working, slap a piece of tracing paper over it and try to make your own correction. Spotting your own mistakes is a good chunk of the learning process.

    Last edited by Alice Herring; June 13th, 2012 at 10:20 PM.
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