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Thread: Water Sketching

  1. #1
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    Last edited by Cyberman; December 5th, 2013 at 03:06 PM.
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  3. #2
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    Good job...try to think and see a bit more in masses and shapes. Be a bit more decisive...use a broad brush. You're a bit stuck on seeing details and trying to paint or indicate forms by painting their details. This is very clear when you went down to gridding out 9 little thumbnails...good idea but your still trying to paint little blades and tiny little notes.

    Check out this guy's WC landscapes: Dale Laitinen

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  5. #3
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    Wow! Sent chills up my spine...what a big step forward man! Way to fucking go!

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  7. #4
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    Yes, more like the latest! Use big brushes, and especially with watercolor, don't be afraid to put down dark colors, they get lighter when dry and the medium already has a limited value range, so what you might think is going way to far is usually just about right.

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
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  9. #5
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    Nice story...that's one of the coolest thigs about plein air...a story goes with every one!

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  11. #6
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    love plein air sketches like these, control of the medium is definitely improving.

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  13. #7
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    Hey, I like most of them. I would just suggest to not to be afraid of using stronger and purer colors. Your are bit too muddy at the moment. Check Sargent's watercolors for inspiration.

    Cheers

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  15. #8
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    That's great for observation for sure...the multiple studies/different times thing. Noon is tough...high contrast and short shadows. When scanning for compositions try to think of the light and shadow patterns as the composition...the subjects/things themselves should be less important. If that makes sense.

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  17. #9
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    Well...not exactly positive/negative so much...landscape is a bit trickier that way...since it exists on such a different scale. Basically you have the "landscape" as positive and the "sky" as negative...or in your but that wasn't what I was getting at.

    Basically I was getting at the idea of seeing the light and shadow as important aspects of the composition...even more so than the objects and things within the scene themselves. I'll try to find some examples and point you to them...maybe mine if I have any good ones or tohers that demonstrate what I was trying to say.

    The landscape is a more abstract problem that figure or still life. It is less about subject and more about light. But don't worry too much about it - you'll come to your own understanding of that aspect in your own time.

    Edit: Ya know...my stuff doesn't illustrate what I'm talking about very well! At least none of the few posted here. I'll try to come up with some stuff. Meanwhile you could check out dpaint's stuff...and maybe timpaatkins. Anyway, basic idea is to try to see the light and shadow patterns aas teh real subject...not trees, buildings, etc...again just think on that in th eback of your mind a bit when scanning around for a good scene.

    Last edited by JeffX99; June 11th, 2012 at 09:46 PM.
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  19. #10
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    Your sketches are very lively.
    I think it could be worth to sit and do it slowly, with correct values, perspective and shapes. This should teach you valuable lessons which you would otherwise miss if you keep painting freely. My teacher always told me: You must constantly challenge yourself - never become too comfortable or your growth will be hindered.

    And this is the best advice I've ever got.

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  21. #11
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    I would agree with that Merlin. At the same time everyone has a different temperament or "way" about them. It is good to try different things and modes of working though.

    What I was going to suggest Sean is, since you have this awesome pier handy...think more abstractly than "draw pier"....get down in there under the thing or right next to...and do some focused compositions of shadow and structure patterns...things more suited to observation of broad passages of value with larger brushes. But that's just me. Also try to do it near a group of girls your age getting undressed.

    Last edited by JeffX99; August 20th, 2012 at 01:42 AM. Reason: typo
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  23. #12
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    Hey there! I like the subdued mood and subtlety of your sketches. You might want to look at John Salminen (http://www.johnsalminen.com/gallery.jsp) who works in watercolour -- his stuff is very detailed because I think he works quite large, but he also has very subdued colour schemes. You might want to add small, bright touches of colour at the end to liven up your monochromatic sketches and draw attention to one or two focal points.

    I think #3 is your best so far, but I also like the various sketches of Ruby's Cafe, and that last sketch you posted has an interesting composition.

    The undressing girls story is funny. When I was sketching in Barcelona two German tourists parked themselves right in front of me and started making out. I think this sort of thing only happens to landscape artists and nature photographers.

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  25. #13
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    Very cool! I especially like the one in post 3 but your other ones are fantastic as well. Keep up the great work!

    Please stop by my sketchbook and leave me a critique: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=237656
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