Two anatomy questions

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  1. #1
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    Two anatomy questions

    Friends, this is my first time in the forum. I have two questions about anatomy. If anyone can help me I really appreciate it. (Sorry for my limited English. I only speak Spanish.) (1) What is the "Band of Richer" or "Band of Richter"? Some methods of drawing typically draw above the knee. But my surgeon says it does not exist. (2) Dan Thompson said in an article several systems to measure in dealing with the figure. I can not understand one of them. I transcribe the method. If anyone understands and can illustrate with an example I will be very grateful: "TREE-POINT MEASUREMENT, involves identifying major and minor points and comparing triangles and angles against one another. "Triangulation is a good word for it," he says. "It allows you to notice inmediately if something is bigger or smaller." These triangles can be based upon the areas between the major points of a figure. "With time and experience, you can tell if a certain point is a mjor point or a minor point," he says. "Some points are important, others not."

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    Quote Originally Posted by rinrinconcon View Post
    Friends, this is my first time in the forum. I have two questions about anatomy. If anyone can help me I really appreciate it. (Sorry for my limited English. I only speak Spanish.) (1) What is the "Band of Richer" or "Band of Richter"? Some methods of drawing typically draw above the knee. But my surgeon says it does not exist.
    There are different approaches to dealing with the knee, maybe ask your surgeon how he draws the knee?

    (2) Dan Thompson said in an article several systems to measure in dealing with the figure. I can not understand one of them. I transcribe the method. If anyone understands and can illustrate with an example I will be very grateful: "TREE-POINT MEASUREMENT, involves identifying major and minor points and comparing triangles and angles against one another. "Triangulation is a good word for it," he says. "It allows you to notice inmediately if something is bigger or smaller." These triangles can be based upon the areas between the major points of a figure. "With time and experience, you can tell if a certain point is a mjor point or a minor point," he says. "Some points are important, others not."
    Does he give an example, with pictures and everything? If not, move on to a different presentation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rinrinconcon View Post
    (1) What is the "Band of Richer" or "Band of Richter"? Some methods of drawing typically draw above the knee. But my surgeon says it does not exist.
    Might be a historical name for the structure. I think it means the tight fascial band supporting the knee on the outside, under the lateral head of the quadriceps. Don't bother.

    (2) Dan Thompson said in an article several systems to measure in dealing with the figure. I can not understand one of them. I transcribe the method. If anyone understands and can illustrate with an example I will be very grateful: "TREE-POINT MEASUREMENT, involves identifying major and minor points and comparing triangles and angles against one another. "Triangulation is a good word for it," he says. "It allows you to notice inmediately if something is bigger or smaller." These triangles can be based upon the areas between the major points of a figure. "With time and experience, you can tell if a certain point is a mjor point or a minor point," he says. "Some points are important, others not."
    Look at the model. Pick two clear anatomical points, say, the right shoulder arc and the top of the patella. The line connecting them should go at the same angle in the model in front of you and your drawing. Pick a third point, e.g. the navel. The lines connecting it to the other two points should go at the same angles in the model and the drawing. If they do, you've got a correct measurement.

    The idea here is that you can get the correct distance to the third point if you get the exact angles to it from the first two points. The point of their intersection will "place itself", more reliably than if you try to measure distances by eye.

    That's triangulation. Measuring with triangles. You can also just measure angles and parallel lines.

    Major points are simply the ones that are consistent and useful structures that you can see most of the time. Usually these bony protrusions that are not covered in muscle or consistently readable: shoulder arc, patella, head of ulna, ankle bones, chin, angle of mandible, xiphoid...

    Nothing bars you from using incidental points, though. Like an endpoint of the thigh fold in a seated figure, or the rightmost tangent point of the shin muscles on the outer side.

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    The Band of Richer is a pretty minor thing to know, but is a small detail I enjoy seeing. I very rarely see it, although on some people it can be quite noticeable at times (on others such as myself it is impossible to see). Basically the easiest (and almost only) time you can see it is when the leg is straight, at rest, and weight bearing. It is visible on the medial (NOT lateral like arenhaus said) side of the knee--it runs right across the Vastus Medialis. It causes the suprapatellar bulge, so basically cuts into the Vastus Medialis and separates it in two, meaning either side of it bulges a bit. It is a bit hard to describe and hard to find images of online. If you can pick up a copy of Stephen Rogers Peck's book Atlas of Human Anatomy for the Artist he shows some good pictures of it in there (in my book from pages 132-135).

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