Student, just starting and impatient to get better. Help me out!

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  1. #1
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    Student, just starting and impatient to get better. Help me out!

    Hey guys! So so far I'm getting accustomed to my tablet and drawing. I've taken some courses in perspective and light so I'm "decently" comfortable with those concepts. I'm super inspired by Feng Zhu and others of that style, but drawing quickly is currently my problem. I take a long time on my drawings but am working on loosening up.

    My next goal is to make a scene with ambiance! Anyways, here is where I am so far...

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    My thoughts:

    If you feel that you're taking too long, it's probably because you have to redo a lot of stuff, and the reason for that is not doing enough studies on fundamentals. I have the very same problem, which is why I have only drawn the simplest objects lately and paid a lot of attention to values, shapes, light and all that. While improving takes time, I at least am starting to see more stuff that I previously missed, like reflected light in different circumstances. I think that you would profit the most from doing a lot of studies in pencil. There's nothing wrong with drawing fun stuff either, but make sure that you practise the basics a lot. Drawing with pencil and on paper will also help you more than fiddling around in photoshop, since you don't have ctrl+z in real life. It will force you to think more about each single stroke you do.

    So, take some simple objects, have a seat someplace with good light which casts some nice shadows and draw them, fist in black and white. How about starting a sketchbook here?

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  5. #3
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    Starting a sketchbook would be a great way to get me committed to the basics. Could you specify what to work on exactly? I mean, basics.. obviously.. but what ARE the basics?! thanks

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    The basics are structure, perspective and form, specifically how to define form by using light and shading. It seems to me that this is what you're having trouble with, because the lighting on your creature is quite inconsistent, and the areas that are in the light are quite shapeless.

    It basically comes down to this; every subject you draw, no matter how complex can be broken down into basic geometric shapes. Cubes, spheres, cylinders, cones and so on. If you don't know how to properly draw these basic geometric shapes in a certain perspective, or define their form by using light and shading, you will most certainly not be able to do so with a much more complex form. Look up Andrew Loomis' "Successful Drawing", it covers these basics very well. Good luck .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lhune View Post
    The basics are structure, perspective and form, specifically how to define form by using light and shading. It seems to me that this is what you're having trouble with, because the lighting on your creature is quite inconsistent, and the areas that are in the light are quite shapeless.

    It basically comes down to this; every subject you draw, no matter how complex can be broken down into basic geometric shapes. Cubes, spheres, cylinders, cones and so on. If you don't know how to properly draw these basic geometric shapes in a certain perspective, or define their form by using light and shading, you will most certainly not be able to do so with a much more complex form. Look up Andrew Loomis' "Successful Drawing", it covers these basics very well. Good luck .
    Thank you! This is exactly what I need. Can you point out some spots on the creature where the lighting was inconsistent and needs some work/what is wrong with it?

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    Well, everywhere. I don't think you quite see your creature as a 3D object in space just yet, which means you don't quite understand how the forms move back and forward in your drawing and how this affects the way the light hits the different planes. This shows in the way you use rim lighting among other things, because there really wouldn't be a rim light in the areas you drew them. I can't explain it as well as I can show you, and even then I won't pretend to be an expert but I hope this helps;

    Student, just starting and impatient to get better. Help me out!

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    Very nice Lhune.

    My one suggestion is not to be "impatient" as your title states. This stuff takes years and years of practice, but it should be an enjoyable experience along the way. It sure is frustrating at times, but it's worth it in the end. Just keep practicing and every year you will see leaps of improvements. As far as speed goes, well, that comes with practice. Good luck.

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    I have a long ways to go! Thank you guys. So to improve, you guys recommend doing a whole bunch of these light studies with simple objects?

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    Yes, absolutely! Reading Loomis' books and doing the exercises will surely help as well. Here's a link to online pdfs, but if you can get your hands on a book it'd be great! Pdfs are kind of irritating, especially when they're this large. Not to mention that you support the author when you buy it. http://alexhays.com/loomis/ I suggest you start with the book Lhune recommended, "Successful drawing".

    Edit: Studying this picture will help you a lot as well http://www.conceptart.org/forums/att...4&d=1309368829

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