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Thread: It's that animation vs illustration thing again...

  1. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alice Herring View Post
    It happens.

    Would you be interested in some book recommendations?
    By all means, sure.
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  3. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Meloncov View Post
    You're not talking to the right people, then. Especially in animation, story artists have perhaps the most creative freedom and influence on the final film of any below the line employee. It's also one of the best stepping stones for eventually becoming a director.
    I agree, but boarding is also farther away from making nice pictures and closer to movie making. I am not sure whether it appeals to OP who is at limbo between illustration and animation.
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    I agree, but boarding is also farther away from making nice pictures and closer to movie making. I am not sure whether it appeals to OP who is at limbo between illustration and animation.

    Eezacque- I am indeed interested in movie making, but only to a certain degree, I guess. Like most people, I enjoy I coming up with my own stories (in this case cartoon stories) and bringing them to life in the real world. However, the physical product would most likely take the form of a graphic novel instead of feature-length film. Being able to direct a shot by way of a few pen strokes is just fine for me and would probably bring about more satisfaction than using an actual camera.

    So, yes, creating pretty pictures is important. And I would like to be involved in film, either by boarding or creating some very short shorts.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Rover View Post
    By all means, sure.
    I'm not recommending any books that deal specifically with the animation principles. First, because everyone seems to always recommend the same ones so they're easy to find, and second, you've already made it pretty clear you're not interested in actually being an animator - which is totally cool. If you go the illustration path you'll get a solid foundation in individual picture making, which can also open up the Vis Dev route in animation. It just means you'll have to study acting and film on your own. (Take acting classes, if you can!)

    ANYWAY.

    The two most often recommended books regarding filmmaking are:

    Shot By Shot
    5 C's of Cinematography

    I also found The Filmmaker's Eye interesting, and it's a little more accessible than Shot By Shot.

    A great way to learn is also study your favorite movies - try and do thumbnails for each of the shots in a short sequence. (I wouldn't recommend doing the entire film, just for the sake of time and sanity.)

    Here are books that talk more about character acting and/or story development:

    Prepare to Board! (note: this is NOT a how-to-storyboard book, but the development process that happens before boarding. It pretty much recreates my pre-production class at school in terms of information.)

    Animated Performance: Bringing imaginary animal, human and fantasy characters to life Also by Nancy Beiman - title speaks for itself, here. Some of the same topics are touched upon in Prepare to Board! But are explained further here.

    I also found Acting for Animators by Ed Hooks an interesting read; and again, it covered topics that had come up in a few of my classes. This version has been updated though - I have the older one.

    My last recommendation is a bit of both combined, although it's not a beginner book. The author takes you through the reasoning of how's and whys of choices of storyboarding a story while..well. Storyboarding a story!
    Directing The Story
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alice Herring View Post
    I'm not recommending any books that deal specifically with the animation principles. First, because everyone seems to always recommend the same ones so they're easy to find, and second, you've already made it pretty clear you're not interested in actually being an animator - which is totally cool. If you go the illustration path you'll get a solid foundation in individual picture making, which can also open up the Vis Dev route in animation. It just means you'll have to study acting and film on your own. (Take acting classes, if you can!)

    ANYWAY.

    The two most often recommended books regarding filmmaking are:

    Shot By Shot
    5 C's of Cinematography

    I also found The Filmmaker's Eye interesting, and it's a little more accessible than Shot By Shot.

    A great way to learn is also study your favorite movies - try and do thumbnails for each of the shots in a short sequence. (I wouldn't recommend doing the entire film, just for the sake of time and sanity.)

    Here are books that talk more about character acting and/or story development:

    Prepare to Board! (note: this is NOT a how-to-storyboard book, but the development process that happens before boarding. It pretty much recreates my pre-production class at school in terms of information.)

    Animated Performance: Bringing imaginary animal, human and fantasy characters to life Also by Nancy Beiman - title speaks for itself, here. Some of the same topics are touched upon in Prepare to Board! But are explained further here.

    I also found Acting for Animators by Ed Hooks an interesting read; and again, it covered topics that had come up in a few of my classes. This version has been updated though - I have the older one.

    My last recommendation is a bit of both combined, although it's not a beginner book. The author takes you through the reasoning of how's and whys of choices of storyboarding a story while..well. Storyboarding a story!
    Directing The Story

    Alice- I particularly like the last book you recommended. It seems to be the thing I've been searching for all along.

    And yeah, I guess being an animator isn't for me at the moment, but I still love cartoons. I guess I was just concerned that I would be barred from entering the field because my interests were a little different.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Rover View Post
    Eezacque- I am indeed interested in movie making, but only to a certain degree, I guess. Like most people, I enjoy I coming up with my own stories (in this case cartoon stories) and bringing them to life in the real world. However, the physical product would most likely take the form of a graphic novel instead of feature-length film. Being able to direct a shot by way of a few pen strokes is just fine for me and would probably bring about more satisfaction than using an actual camera.

    So, yes, creating pretty pictures is important. And I would like to be involved in film, either by boarding or creating some very short shorts.
    I suggest you make up your mind, as you cannot do it all in limited time. If you're interested in graphic novel, focus on that.
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  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    I suggest you make up your mind, as you cannot do it all in limited time. If you're interested in graphic novel, focus on that.
    eezacque--I think this piece of advice is sound, too, as it often takes a lifetime of practice to become proficient at one craft. But it also feels scary sometimes, because it feels as though I'm limiting myself to just one outcome.

    Still, I know what you're saying.
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