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Thread: I just want to cartoon. Do I really need to learn traditional drawing and stuff?

  1. #14
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    Cartooning is reality simplified and exaggerated. Unless you're going to be drawing Shapeless Amoeba's Adventures in Abstractland, your cartoons will likely wear clothes, sit in chairs, ride vehicles and go places. So you're going to be studying and analyzing all those things anyway. If you need to draw a guy in a flock of pigeons you're going to need to look at pigeons, figure out what the essential features of a pigeon are and how to portray them. This, by the way, is what a realist artist does too, except at the end they figure out how to render the pigeon realistically and you figure out how to make it look funny while still looking like a pigeon.

    So no, you can't really escape learning how to draw from life. But you can probably skip a few thousand hours rendering the shit out of things.
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  4. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineris View Post
    Cartooning is reality simplified and exaggerated. Unless you're going to be drawing Shapeless Amoeba's Adventures in Abstractland, your cartoons will likely wear clothes, sit in chairs, ride vehicles and go places. So you're going to be studying and analyzing all those things anyway. If you need to draw a guy in a flock of pigeons you're going to need to look at pigeons, figure out what the essential features of a pigeon are and how to portray them. This, by the way, is what a realist artist does too, except at the end they figure out how to render the pigeon realistically and you figure out how to make it look funny while still looking like a pigeon.
    Amazing, thanks. I'm creating a balanced study schedule that mixes the best of both worlds.

    Quote Originally Posted by vineris View Post
    But you can probably skip a few thousand hours rendering the shit out of things.
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  5. #16
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    Agreed. You could of course make cartoons without studying it things, but it will depend on what you had in mind. If you don't actually want to DRAW, but do little weird cartoon strips for newspapers, then that's going to be one thing. But if you want to do anything on the level of Tom and Jerry, Balto or even Disney style, then you'll have to reach a whole new level to make it believable.

    Disney have a long row of interesting 'making of' vids on youtube that really describes what goes into capturing a character. This stuff is not just good for animation - this is stuff that you, presuming you want to be a cartoonist as a trade, better learn. Here's one for the Lion King that sums it up reasonably well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rkb0r...eature=related
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  7. #17
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    When submitting a portfolio to Disney animation specifically, they request (or at least, did back in '96 when I was "apprenticing" with them) ONLY a sketchbook full of gesture sketches.

    No finished refined pieces, no cartoons, no reels. Just gesture sketches.

    I imagine, unless you intend to freelance, getting into any studio at all from cartooning to animating will require a solid foundation in life drawing.
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  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by LEvans View Post
    When submitting a portfolio to Disney animation specifically, they request (or at least, did back in '96 when I was "apprenticing" with them) ONLY a sketchbook full of gesture sketches.

    No finished refined pieces, no cartoons, no reels. Just gesture sketches.

    I imagine, unless you intend to freelance, getting into any studio at all from cartooning to animating will require a solid foundation in life drawing.
    I'm not sure if that's true anymore. I had the opportunity to go to one of the Disney Inspire Days back in 2007, and they seemed pretty open to reels, story sketches, vis dev portfolios, etc, when applying to the Talent Development program. However, for most job types in animation understanding gestures (learned through gesture sketching!) is really important I guess in animation gesture drawing could be considered a foundation skill - even if you don't show it specifically in your portfolio, it'll show in the designs, how you draw characters when their acting, etc.
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