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  1. #1
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    Critique and questions asked

    First of all, I'd very much like to recieve some critique to improve this drawing, a character very much based on Natalie Dormer.

    Name:  conceptart - merneith.jpg
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    My goal is to give the character the same atmosphere the actress had in GoT. Fierce in a controlled way and noble, but still able to connect with ''the crowed''. I know it's a bunch to cap in one picture, but I'm ambitious.

    Now to my questions, I want to create a small portfolio for in the future. In the portfolio I'd like to have a general ''thing'', which I choose to be creating a world. In about 10-20 small projects I'd like to show a small part of a world I thought up, including things like environment, characters, cities, animals etc. But how should I do this? How do I build up such a thing? Where do I look for inspiration? How do I organize such a portfolio like project? And moreover, is it smart to create such a thing in a portfolio, or should it exist out of random selected pieces I'd like to show people?

    And my last question; I'd like to work out this character more (to put it into the small portfolio), how do I do it? Should I draw one full body drawing, or more? And what kind of full body drawings;

    Name:  concetp art- character concept.jpg
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    Thanks for reading. I'm not asking of you to give an answer to all of my problems, just giving advice about one subject would be awesome.

    EDIT: there they are, apperantly the files where too big...

    Last edited by Jilliart; May 22nd, 2012 at 10:42 AM.
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  3. #2
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    Hi Jilliart

    Try posting again matey the images are not showing up! just place markers make sure they are .jpg or some other common format.

    Sorry matey

    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook
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  4. #3
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    Yeah, either it's not accepting .png's or the files were too big. I'm guessing the latter.

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    anyone got any critique/advice?

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  6. #5
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    Do more form studies, your values are very washy. also get more than one reference to help to stop just copying it; even if you mean not to it'll probably turn out that way.

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    You aren't reading the form that well. Give you a photo that has some anatomy obscured by the lighting, and you ignore that piece of anatomy altogether.

    I recommend getting some perspective and structural drawing exercises. Use real objects and live models. Focus on building the form, tracking the lit planes, and understanding what structures you are looking at.

    (Do the exercises in real medium like pencil or charcoal, too. It's easier than digital.)

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    I agree with arenhaus about the reference thing. Studying from pictures often create issues for artists, and photos are not how we see. That can create anatomy issues, and for me specifically, capturing that spark and personality in the person you are drawing that you desire.
    I would really watch people first then refer back to the image in general, not as something to copy exactly with your spin on it.
    But I think you are well on your way! Like they said, some study (maybe even facial/expression study) would do you great. (:

    And then the portfolio thing... It really depends on how you work. For me? When I do general portfolios or projects about a world/characters I am creating, I start by writing down some key words that, to me, describe what I am generally trying to get at. From there, I sketch freely with these words/concepts in mind. Don't get too specific yet. Gesture drawings with a lot of movement/emotion is best at the beginning. Once you have completed as many drawings as you see fit, THAT is when you should go back and develop each concept more. I say this because getting caught up in detailing each sketch/image the moment is begins to hatch, it is easy to get stuck in a rut or concept, and not branch beyond that, making it altogether, very stagnant in the sense that it is all a little too linear.

    I hope that makes sense/helps!

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    Alright, thanks you guys, it really helped. With the studies, do I just have to pick a lot of photos from where ever I can get them, or do I have to do life-sessions? Because it's not really like I've got any money to go to life-sessions (young student (16) here)

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    just draw stuff. fruit, trees, your parents, your self in the mirror. everything conforms to the laws of physics so everything is relevant study material. Subject is irrelevant when it comes to form. for anatomy get some Andrew Loomis books.

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    I agree with Chris. Even if I am a little older than you, I am still too broke to go to live model sessions (I was lucky enough to do a class like that but that's irrelevant). People watch! See if you can spend a few hour at a Starbucks, or a park, and just go crazy with the sketching.

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    http://www.amazon.com/Exodyssey-Deve...8164537&sr=8-1
    good book to show you how to present a world....
    as for drawing.......fashion magazines, hairstyle magazines, and of course what you see from the park bench....

    Last edited by williams73; May 27th, 2012 at 09:27 PM. Reason: information
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  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jilliart View Post
    Alright, thanks you guys, it really helped. With the studies, do I just have to pick a lot of photos from where ever I can get them, or do I have to do life-sessions? Because it's not really like I've got any money to go to life-sessions (young student (16) here)
    Bribe friends to sit still, especially if they can read a book or watch TV or text while they're doing it. Friends can usually be paid in cookies. Or trade off modeling with an artistic friend. If you need someone to sit still for you for a bit, chances are that they need someone too. A 20-minute or 30-minute pose should be sufficient.

    If you decide to draw people out in the wild, remember that it's difficult, people move, so your sketches will not look good. This doesn't mean that this exercise is useless or that you have no talent for it, it just means that you shouldn't expect amazing pictures when you only have 30 seconds to scribble someone down.

    See if you can find some classical/realistic statues in a local museum or park, too. They're 3D and they don't move at all.

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