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Thread: Flipping the art switch

  1. #1
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    Flipping the art switch

    I know a lot of you are full time artists and I guess you've got this all worked out. I absolutely love to draw, WHEN I'm in the mood for it. Problem is, fixing computers all day, dealing with a 3 year old, working out, all these things don't put me in the art mood... at all. I'm lucky if I can scrape a few hours to draw here and there. My main issue is that I have a hard time instantly getting in the mood to draw so I can take advantage of my drawing time window. Are you guys able to just flip the switch on and off? How do you get in the mood to draw?
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  3. #2
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    It just takes less thinking and more doing. In my opinion there is no way to really "switch" it on. It's just once you start you don't want to stop; but if you don't start, there is nothing to stop.
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    Yeah forget about being in the mood. At times art will be just like any other job, and you wont feel like doing it. But if you had to support yourself and your family with it, I bet you'd do it, just like your day job fixing computers.

    It gets easier to "just do it". But it takes a while, and that's where most fall off. Most don't have the foresight, the long term vision to understand they'll most likely be putting in the same hours at their day job as what it would take to make a living off art, eventually. Either that or they've just become too complacent in their day job and feel the change would be harder, and it is, temporarily.

    This is all of course if you want to make a living at it.

    It's less about getting in the mood, and more about making a habit of drawing so you aren't dependent on a mood.
    Last edited by Shaggnasty; May 22nd, 2012 at 12:58 AM.
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    Yeah...just have to make yourself do it. I tend to have a lot of things going at once between contract work and personal work, so there is always something to be feeling I'm behind on.
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    You could also try to make a schedule which you then just have to stick to. Of course, you have to invest a few minutes to actually think about what you want to do and when, but maybe you can do this at a time where you can't draw?
    If I have trouble to get started after a long day of university for example (which is totally unrelated to art), it helps to come home and not have to think about what I'll practice today, but just sit down and do whatever my schedule tells me ("22-24h, draw skulls"). Of course, you can adjust this to you liking, make it more flexible for example, if you don't have fixed hours for drawing.
    (Also, I'm not an full time artist, but maybe my opinion still helps)
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    The first thing to realize about the switch is that there is no spoon. I mean switch.
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  13. #7
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    I'm almost only not in the mood when I'm not actually doing it.
    As soon as I sit down and do, I get in the mood.
    That's the curse of procrastination, one of those "it's always worse thinking about doing something than actually doing it"
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    I like the "There is no Spoon" comment.

    I take the metro subway to downtown baltimore. I get 30 min in the morning and 30 min in the evening. I've been trying to use that time to do sketches or to read Loomis on my iPad.

    I like the schedule thing to come up with what I should draw. Right now I'm working on some Loomis male poses. They're very helpful. I printed them out and keep a clipboard with me so I can draw on the subway.

    Thanks for all the encouragement. I love hearing how all of you deal with this common problem. One of the things I like about being a Systems Administrator is that although it drains me energy-wise, it doesn't drain me creatively, in fact, I usually want to draw when I'm at work.

    Once my iPhone/iPad game launches later this year, if it does well, I'm considering relocating to Thailand and continuing to run the business I need about $20K US to take care of my family. Has anybody else made that switch from stable employment to doing art professionally on their own?
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiroboi View Post
    I like the "There is no Spoon" comment.

    I take the metro subway to downtown baltimore. I get 30 min in the morning and 30 min in the evening. I've been trying to use that time to do sketches or to read Loomis on my iPad.

    I like the schedule thing to come up with what I should draw. Right now I'm working on some Loomis male poses. They're very helpful. I printed them out and keep a clipboard with me so I can draw on the subway.

    Thanks for all the encouragement. I love hearing how all of you deal with this common problem. One of the things I like about being a Systems Administrator is that although it drains me energy-wise, it doesn't drain me creatively, in fact, I usually want to draw when I'm at work.

    Once my iPhone/iPad game launches later this year, if it does well, I'm considering relocating to Thailand and continuing to run the business I need about $20K US to take care of my family. Has anybody else made that switch from stable employment to doing art professionally on their own?
    Yeah I did at 30, but I didn't have a family or spouse. It took me five years to make it to full time artist at 35. I can't imagine doing it after the family starts. If you want to be an artist you have to be flexible. Fall in love with the process of making art not in love with the type of art you do.
    I paint traditionally, work in illustration, and video game development. All of it is creative in different ways and all of them use my art skills in different ways. All of them have their good and bad points so it is important to develop enough skills to keep you from burning out doing just one thing all the time.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TinyBird View Post
    The first thing to realize about the switch is that there is no spoon. I mean switch.
    There is a spoon. It just needs to be hammered into the relevant body opening...
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    I use a little trick I picked up for when I don't have a deadline pushing me. I tell myself I only have to work on my current project for at least 10 minutes per day. That's all. Ten minutes. It gets me to sit down and begin.

    The trick is that after I get started I never do just 10 minutes. It's always more. I actually have the opposite problem and can't get myself to stop.
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  21. #12
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    To think in terms of a switch is setting yourself up for failure. You have to tell yourself that art is what you want to do. You should always think about art. 'how would I draw the reflection on my monitor?' Notice the world around you. Cool shadows, hue shifts, highlights... I mean everything. Telling yourself that you have the option of not feeling like it, will make you not feel like it.
    Last edited by Shorinji_Knight; May 22nd, 2012 at 12:01 PM.
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    How many things do you remember being fun while you were learning or getting in shape? When I used to run the getting in shape part was not fun and there was no switch that would make it fun. Once I was in shape and could run for what seemed like forever it was fun. As I got older and my joints protested and I went to something else and the process started over. Skiing was horrible as I learned it. I found a few things I enjoyed as I went along like being with friends or being outdoors but the process of getting successful was not fun.

    Art is not a magic thing in the beginning. The idea of being and artist, animator, etc. is magical and alluring but the reality is hard work. Hard work, especially when you suck at something, is rarely fun.

    Don't look for a switch. Grit your teeth and work your ass off, if you really want to make art and not just be an artist, and with every small success it becomes a little easier. If you work hard enough and are smart enough you may get to that point where magic starts to happen and you can't imagine doing anything else while you are making completely bitchin' pictures.

    No one is born with an on/off switch. You need to earn it.
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