a doodle of two creatures of opposite nature
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  1. #1
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    a doodle of two creatures of opposite nature

    This is done, and I am happy with it, but I feel that if I'm happy with something, then I did something wrong and I must rekindle my critical nature through others.

    THUS: Rip the following digital painting apart. (It's just two creatures who are opposite, almost....no real concept or anything, I just wanted to draw.)


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  2. #2
    RomanRiot's Avatar
    RomanRiot is offline Dedicated Student of the Arts Level 4 Gladiator: Meridiani
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    Hey Featheredface, cool idea, but certainly look to push it farther.

    Both figures are quite pointy nosed, tall, and angular, so change them up. Also you may want to hash out a sketch were both figures join somewhere in their torsos.

    Also, just because you are making an abstraction of something familiar, don't throw good anatomy and form out the window i.e. the spine of the red creature disappears into a wave a muscle...

    Last point, the face of the red creature is much better defined than that of the white, and its apparent. Keep it up, see it again soon.

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    TinyBird is offline Why you gotta be an angry burd Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    This feels to share again same problems as all of your other work. The lighting is inconsistent, the form is inconsistent, the anatomy is questionable (if you're going to do a monster that looks like it's skinned, make sure its musculature makes sense), the placement of some things, like the ears is inconsistent, there's random rimlights here or there so that you can show the form with contour whether it makes sense or looks good or not.
    Why are the white creature's collar bones highlighted, but the chest is a barrel that's completely in shadow, making it look like it has caved in? Also it looks like the left image side shoulder and chest are phasing through each other, I don't think there's room for both of them to be like that, et cetera, et cetera... And your recent Sketchbook posts are suspiciously lacking of any observation practice.

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  6. #4
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    Thank you for your critiques thus far!

    @tinybird: I'll start on them (studies) soon...just never have had the motivation to do so as of recently.

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    I dont even know where to start with studies...everything seems so complex now..

    I feel like I get no where, as people always get frustrated with having to tell me the same thing over and over because I'm too dense and lazy to do studies. My 'art' is ugly, twisted, nothing makes sense because lighting and anatomy and perspective and all that is void.

    I'm sorry I've wasted all of your time.

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    What about taking a break and trying something new away from these long snouted guys. maybe study some screen caps from films, thats a nice way to get into lighting and so on; first you replicate what you see, and gradually you learn how it all fits together.
    give it a try!

    plus, look how hard people work to get good: http://conceptart.org/forums/showthr...=67425&page=31
    pages and pages of study. years of work. Youll be like that one day but you have to take the first step. And a bunch more after that.

    Dont get dispirited, its hard! Someone one these forums once quote some guy who said "good artists are the crap ones who didnt give up." Keep pushing!

    Last edited by Velocity Kendall; May 17th, 2012 at 10:13 PM.
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  10. #7
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    I would say to take a lot simpler look at light and form. Leave reflected light and rim lighting for later. It takes a lot of observation to get that right.

    Symmetry supports form. If your creatures' shoulders and ears and eyes line up according to perspective, it will read as more three dimensional than if they were asymmetrical.

    Try drawing your subjects out as geometric blocks. Draw cross contour lines to wrap you mind around the form, and draw through the figure if you need to figure out the placement of something you can't see. Establish a single light source and do the absolute simplest lighting you can. If the planes face one direction, they're hit by light. If they face another, they're in shadow. Once you've done that, you can add in cast shadows.

    If you have more than one figure, make sure to light both in this way before developing one or the other. Before you begin developing those shapes into something more organic, keep the geometric drawing as a reference. You'll need to maintain some hard edges as points of structure.



    And don't give up!

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