Questions about setting up for perspective drawing - traditional and digital

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    36
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 21 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Question Questions about setting up for perspective drawing - traditional and digital

    How do you guys set up your vanishing points for establishing your construction/perspective? I often feel like I need an ENORMOUS piece of paper in order to get the VPs far enough away from each other to keep things from getting extremely distorted.

    I'm also wondering how you work these things out when drawing digitally. Do you create a much, much bigger canvas for your vanishing points, and then establish a smaller frame within that for the picture? If so, can you post a screenshot of the "big picture" view so I can see how you do it?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    desert
    Posts
    150
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 76 Times in 47 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I've been wondering this as well. Is there some way to expand the drawing space outside of the canvas to place VP's? Instead of starting out with a 6000 x 3500 pixel canvas then cropping out the edges...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    488
    Thanks
    100
    Thanked 109 Times in 74 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Carl Dobsky has released a set of videos which should answer your queries:
    http://theartdepartment.org/download...ky-perspective

    I've watched the first one and ended up with this:
    Questions about setting up for perspective drawing - traditional and digital

    (This is answering the how to set them up so that they dont distort business)

    When I'm drawing an illustration I don't actually set up the whole perspective grid with vanishing points though. I only do it as a way to train my eyes to see convergance.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Saurabhinator For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Kuala Lumpur
    Posts
    16
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When working digitally, another option is to mock it up in 3d. Google SketchUp is really useful for this, and relatively easy to get into. As a bonus, you can try out a few different camera angles in your scene.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,379
    Thanks
    15
    Thanked 457 Times in 322 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When working traditionally, you don't need huge sheets of paper to fix your vanishing points. I used to tape my paper on the wall, and mark my vanishing points on a piece of tape. All you need is a point which is fixed with respect to you paper. A nail would do.

    In Photoshop, I do my construction as a path, which can extend beyond the canvas, and is a vector, so it remains intact when zooming in or out.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    4,165
    Thanks
    2,365
    Thanked 2,332 Times in 1,437 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by neonnoodle View Post
    I often feel like I need an ENORMOUS piece of paper in order to get the VPs far enough away from each other to keep things from getting extremely distorted.
    That feeling is entirely correct. You do need an enormous piece of paper, or at least an enormous table you can drive tacks into at the VP positions. And a long ruler.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    760
    Thanks
    657
    Thanked 368 Times in 245 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I always just draw lightly freehand to set up the basic scene and then impose the hierarchy of perspective, using my initial marks as reference, fixing as I go.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    36
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 21 Times in 9 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Saurabhinator View Post
    Carl Dobsky has released a set of videos which should answer your queries:
    http://theartdepartment.org/download...ky-perspective
    Thanks for that link - I bought those tutorial videos and watched them, but I think what I took away from them was that I don't need to go through that whole process for much of what I do. It's rare for me to draw interiors or rectilinear structures, I mostly draw organic things for which measuring precise distances in perspective is not needed. Most of the time, I should be able to establish a basic ground plane and vanishing points and just go with my gut after that.

    It certainly reconfirmed my suspicions about the scale of the picture plane relative to the vanishing points! The canvas is TINY when he places it in his perspective setups!

    One thing I'm curious about, though -- how did you factor in the lighting/shadow plotting? I think I might have missed it if he went over that in the video.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,001
    Thanks
    891
    Thanked 1,009 Times in 538 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I remember asking that question about how to set up perspective accurately with VPs off the page in a small space awhile back. I got an answer and grid setup but cant remember exactly what it was.

    It didn't have to do with having a big table though lol

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Malaysia
    Posts
    9
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Wayuki View Post
    When working digitally, another option is to mock it up in 3d. Google SketchUp is really useful for this, and relatively easy to get into. As a bonus, you can try out a few different camera angles in your scene.
    I've used that software when I had to be the background artist for my final illustration group assignment.

    It was helpful, but at the same time, as I am just a newbie in perspective, it's kinda hard a little on directing the position you want.

    But it was a good try using Google SketchUp. And I found a tutorial for transporting the 3D models and perspective view into your Photoshop.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nVAfEFQRsFI

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook