Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 16 to 27 of 27
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,800
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,263 Times in 2,075 Posts


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Arshes Nei For This Useful Post:


  4. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    471
    Thanks
    282
    Thanked 157 Times in 138 Posts
    The nose-explanation is really eye-opening.. thanks for posting, didn't know those yet.

  5. #18
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Posts
    185
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 31 Times in 28 Posts
    Once again, always available with your invaluable wisdom. Fantastic links. I don't think I'm guilty of the long nose thing but it was an eye opener nontheless.

  6. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    US
    Posts
    786
    Thanks
    98
    Thanked 153 Times in 137 Posts
    get your anatomy down, learn to shade using hatching/crosshatching and blending with pencil control.

    Also, study the face as much as you can - Anime tends to butcher it a tad bit.. Noses are not checkmarks, and eyes are not these giant squares.. No.. Study the face, and that alone will help out a lot.
    The usual staples for anatomy:
    George Bridgman
    Joseph Sheppard
    Andrew Loomis

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to hitnrun For This Useful Post:


  8. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 22 Times in 15 Posts
    Ah the Anime Curse... always rearing it's head to the artist that began there...

    my art took a very long time to escape it's clutches... but what helped is to realize how simple anime had become my style (was not proud of this but a good realization)

    I'd gotten there through mimicry and thus i started with what could be similar and relate able to my current anime style, which was American comics. Joe Mad was the foundation then i used his style's progression to progress myself... culled the stylization in place for more and more detail (as Mad did with work like Darksider's concept art). then when that had settled began looking more to anatomy, studying an art coarse with actual models helped that grow comfortably.

    But the best advice is to realize that Anime is VERY bad for a style or technique and you must grow away from it.

    Aspiring Digital Fantasy Artist
    DEVIANTART BLOGSPOT TUMBLR

  9. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    HELLsinki, Finland
    Posts
    4,853
    Thanks
    345
    Thanked 2,687 Times in 1,644 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Steamhat View Post
    But the best advice is to realize that Anime is VERY bad for a style or technique and you must grow away from it.
    Well, it's better said that it's a really bad for a foundation and not good to start with, but it's not like anime/manga style on its own is somehow inherently bad.
    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
    Comic!
    Sketchbook (Critiques, no compliments please.)
    Tumblr
    Website
    Livejournal
    DeviantArt

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to TinyBird For This Useful Post:


  11. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,004
    Thanks
    891
    Thanked 1,009 Times in 538 Posts
    It's not the "Anime/Manga" style that's an issue. It's the lack of knowledge beneath the average person doing it that is. The 'mimicry' if you will I can show countless artists who use that genre but are amazing (1000x more fan artists that are terrible of course though)

    Hell I love Gez Frys stuff. I still remember it even though he hasn't been on here in years
    When I was first on here with an old account like 8 years ago I made the standard anime post as well
    Realized it's not the style it's the lack of knowledge that's the issue.

    I want to draw but Anime keeps coming out.

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to JFierce For This Useful Post:


  13. #23
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Posts
    185
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 31 Times in 28 Posts
    I suppose I should clarify a bit. I hunger for more realism and flexibility. My goal isn't to run screaming from anime in the exact opposite direction, but rather to start again from the ground up and fashion a new style that's inherently mine. I'm a tad resentful of Anime just popping up and being reminded that its my style. I don't hate it but at the same time, I want to be original and take future art in the direction where I want it to go not a direction dictated by a certain look or cannon.

    I feel like Anime is a good friend and one I look up to, but that I've relied on for too long. I feel like saying "Anime buddy, I respect you very much and we may meet again in the future, but I need to set out do discover my path for myself. Kyousukete ne (take care)."

  14. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    74
    Thanks
    4
    Thanked 22 Times in 15 Posts
    JFierce hit the nail on the head...
    it really is the lack of knowledge behind the 'style' and that it teaches you through mimicry that stops you as an artist...

    I want to draw but Anime keeps coming out.

    I want to draw but Anime keeps coming out.

    Joe Mad and Stjepan Sejic both have roots in anime as inspiration... but now they treat form and detailing with a lot more respect and devotion, allowing their styles to keep strong. but their technique having a WHOLE lot more potential. If you can master a shading style similar to these, couple it with general knowledge of anatomy and you can make anything... ANYTHING! MUAHAHAHAHAHA!!!!

    Aspiring Digital Fantasy Artist
    DEVIANTART BLOGSPOT TUMBLR

  15. #25
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Posts
    185
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 31 Times in 28 Posts
    I've felt like I'm lacking in fundamentals and that's why I can't really progress until I go back and finish all those anatomy studies that I shirked in art school.

    Joe Mad has incredible skills. I don't want to draw like him exactly but I like how he's developed his own style. A good example for sure you posted.

  16. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    717
    Thanks
    932
    Thanked 291 Times in 208 Posts
    Start sculpting, too. That'll help you gain respect for form, and then if you sculpt a basic maquette carefully enough you can use it as reference.

  17. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Slothboy3000 For This Useful Post:


  18. #27
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bangkok, Thailand
    Posts
    185
    Thanks
    37
    Thanked 31 Times in 28 Posts
    Its interesting you say that. Back in art school, my human figure class was mostly sculpting. I really saw the value in it but sometimes my lack of sculpting skills was a hinderance to learning in that method.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Similar Threads

  1. SketchBook: Benjie's Shit : DRAW, DRAW, DRAW (and never stop)
    By Benjie in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 298
    Last Post: May 7th, 2012, 12:40 PM
  2. "An Anime Artist's Retort to the Anti-Anime Artist"(NSFW)
    By FlipMcgee in forum Art Discussions
    Replies: 107
    Last Post: January 2nd, 2008, 06:59 PM
  3. Anime fans, what anime film is this?
    By timpaatkins in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: February 26th, 2006, 05:14 PM

Members who have read this thread: 2

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Developed Actively by the makers of the Best Amazon Podcast