Trying to reproduce something, Help!
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    Trying to reproduce something, Help!

    Greetings,

    I hope this is the right section, and I hope someone might be of help with an issue that has been on my mind lately.

    I have seen a few older works where the lines used in drawings are very black, pitch black, something you only tend to see in compressed charcoal or ivory black / oil, dark dark blacks.

    An example of an old drawing is this: http://oi48.tinypic.com/1h3uhf.jpg

    But it doesn't seem to be charcoal to me, there are very fine lines in there that I can't possibly make with charcoal, not even charcoal pencils, no matter how sharp I sharpen them. Am I wrong and is it charcoal?

    Can anyone explain what paper / pencil or material that person would have used, I seem to get darker lines the more toothy paper I use, but in that work of him there is no visible tooth in the black sections.

    Thank you.

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    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    That image isn't much to go on, even harder without knowing the date or any processing that may have been done digitally. Looks to me like it was definitely adjusted to be very dark because the background is a medium gray and the original was likely much lighter - white or off-white.

    It could very well be etching or stone lithography as well where you get very dark darks/black because it is ink used to reproduce a drawing.

    You can get that look any number of ways from dark, soft leads in the 6B-8B range, black prismacolor, dark linework scanned and then adjusted...just experiment.

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    Thank you Jeff.

    I didn't think about the post processing that could have went on by the publisher or the printing process.

    Lately I have been experimenting with a few different pencils, some 8B are very dark, some are not so dark, seems to depend solely on brand and the amount of wax and what kind of graphite or added charcoal used in the production of the pencil.

    Loomis has similar lovely blacks, not as black as that work, but still. I read he used coquille board though, a shame that it's so expensive nowadays. Still searching for which paper I prefer and can give me good blacks without losing too much detail from the tooth.

    Thanks again.

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    Try Bristol board (really ist's heavy paper). I prefer hot press for the kind of thing you're talking about, which is very smooth.

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    Thank you. I will give it a shot for sure, I remember using Canson Bristol in the past but that was years ago with much lighter pencils at the time. Only thing that bothered me at the time is that you lose a tiny bit of grip, but I was very unskilled and new at the time and the pencils I have now seem to have wax in them and add some grip. Thanks again ).

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    I get that look when I scan regular 2b pencil drawings on white paper and darken them in photoshop (via levels or multiply). If you're comfortable with a digital final product, you can always just do that. If you're looking for a traditional way to do this, that's not very helpful though, sorry.

    'Cuz life is full of your regrets, and I should be one...
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    The most important thing is that you can't mistake what you see in print for what was actually done on a surface like paper.

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