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Thread: Springtime 80%

  1. #1
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    Springtime 80%

    My first attempt at cartoon retro. Her face was the product of a random scribble and everything else has been flying by the seat of my pants to capture whats in my mind. Alphonse Mucha, Shane Glines, Julian Carllos were my model targets. Below are the artists I was studying for this piece. No doubt Mucha influenced these other two. What do they have that I am just not getting?

    I feel like I could do better with the color somehow, its also somewhat boring.
    I actually liked the pose when sketched but... i dunno, i think the background made it boring.
    Name:  girl-sitting-background.jpg
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    Last edited by Raptor; May 3rd, 2012 at 05:19 PM. Reason: Forgot the attachment
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  3. #2
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    With the face,planning things out can help improve it in the long run

    Formerly Ultimatum.

    A smooth sea never made a skillful sailor.

    Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so."
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  4. #3
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    I agree it's the face that is mainly letting it down. Her mouth isn't under her nose, her eyes are different sizes and you've given her bags under them. Not sure if you've captured your influences much, but with the face sorted it won't be a total disaster.

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  5. #4
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    Your primary mistake is that you are imitating the style without thinking of the underlying method.

    All - and I mean all - of the artists whose work you've shown here as your inspirations - have at least some awareness of form. Most of them have a very solid grasp of form (with the possible exception of whoever did the first little picture). Even the last picture with arms bent like rubber has clear indications that the artist was thinking in terms of form, they just played with it for effect.

    Your picture, on the other hand, shows that zero attention was paid to form. You had been imitating lines and superficial trinkets.

    If you want a real foundation that would allow you to play with other artists' styles, start with the fundamentals. Learn to think of the round form in space as you draw, not about lines on the flat page.

    Since your goal here seems to be cartoon drawing, I recommend studying the drawing methods that animators use. Preston Blair's manual is quite good, for instance. Books by Andrew Loomis also teach a good structural drawing method.

    Start with studying perspective of simple shapes like cubes and cylinders, then go on to learn structural drawing. Begin with simple still life exercises, then go on to anatomy and drawing people, preferably from life. Then you'll be able to progress to cartooning.

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  6. #5
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    What everyone else said, plus: you might want to consider not making all your color so sugary. The palettes on all the examples you posted include both intense and desaturated colors.

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