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  1. #40
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    my opinion: If you're going to be moving, I would stick with the folding one because after moving long distances and taking my table apart and putting it back together over and over it just gets really cumbersome and annoying. My table also has the side trays but I've taken them off because not only will you bump into them but the plastic can become brittle with age and crack-thus breaking them further when you bump into them. I don't really care for any extra drawers and stuff because they all just get in the way. If I need drawers I can put one of those rolling plastic bins (the kind you get at officemax or staples) next to my table. The folding table doesn't have any kind of bar along the bottom though like your old one. I kind of prefer that sort of foot rest but if you want one I guess you could get a stool or something.

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  3. #41
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    Ah.. I see now. I never really used it for a foot rest anyway. It feels uncomfortable to draw that way sometimes. And getting bins I could do as well.

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  4. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iso View Post
    What I've mainly been reading is all the materials seem to be the same.
    For comic artists, yeah -- the absolute cheapest thing that will do the job you want done. Especially manga artists. When you're putting out an ungodly amount of pages a week, you can't afford to waste time and money experimenting with art materials.

    If you're an indie comic artist all the materials are not at all the same. There are indie comics done beautifully with just about any art material you can imagine, from paper cutouts to acrylic paints to watercolours to ink to photographs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Iso View Post
    So what would you guys say are your must needed weapons at home? Like if you were to have your own Art Studio; which is what I plan to do.
    Of all the things I've tried, I mostly can't live without white vinyl erasers -- the eraser of champions. I can probably live without any other one single thing, and it's a good thing too because chances are that if I want it the art store has just run out of it. If Photoshop crashes I can use Illustrator or ArtRage or GIMP, if my pen breaks I have six other kinds, if I can't find the watercolours I can probably do the job with acrylic ink washes, but I've never found a good replacement for those white Staedtler erasers.

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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shorinji_Knight View Post
    Pencils, pens, brushes, paper (110lb Card stock), erasers, clipboard. Newspaper/table cheap set of student paints. That is all you need to learn.
    Solid advice, except don't buy cheap student-grade paints. You'll be overpaying for dyed chalk and not getting any kind of color strength. If you want to go into painting, buy a tube each of titanium white, ivory black and red ochre, all artist grade paints. That'll be enough for your exercises for a while.

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  6. #44
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    I would also suggest a clipboard/laptop desk tray with some cushioning (which can double for a laptop tray) for on the go work. I take that with me to the museum with a small stack of black papers, or other places away from home where I want to sketch on a stable surface. They're also pretty cheap, usually coming in under $20.

    Trying to take a more serious path with my art

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  7. #45
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    I want to chime in on the topic of paints.
    Everyone has preferences and different experience with the starter paint set, and I'll share mine for what it's worth. The first 2 years of learning to paint I got by with the cheapest stuff available, and I painted on cheap cardboard grounded with PVA glue/water solution. Of course it's tougher this way, and takes more time, but I couldn't really afford anything else given the volume of work I had to do.
    So, I guess it depends mainly on your budget, if you can get the better stuff and can regularly afford it( if you paint seriously you'll need lots of it), good for you, if not - the cheap options will do the job too.

    Good luck with your artistic path!

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  8. #46
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    Also, good paint doesn't have to be the most super-elite-expensive brand in the store... There's some brands that are decent quality for a decent price - I usually bought Utrecht oils as a student because they were affordable, but it so happens they're also pretty good quality (I still use a lot of Utrecht oils...)

    And you don't need ALL the colors. Some primaries and white are good for starters. Maybe black and burnt umber as well (both of which are cheap colors.)

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  10. #47
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    Hey Queen Gwenevere, may I chime in with a question?

    For beginning painting, do you recommend starting with acrylics or will watercolors work? I was thinking about getting a simple set of water colors to try out because acrylics feel too advance for me at the moment.

    "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step."
    Lao-tzu, Chinese philosopher (604 BC - 531 BC)

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  11. #48
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    Watercolours are really tough. With acrylics you can paint over your mistakes.

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  12. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iso View Post
    lol Why did your wife kick you off the kitchen table?
    I had a slight misunderstanding with an X-Acto knife

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  13. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reutte View Post
    Hey Queen Gwenevere, may I chime in with a question?

    For beginning painting, do you recommend starting with acrylics or will watercolors work? I was thinking about getting a simple set of water colors to try out because acrylics feel too advance for me at the moment.
    If it's a choice between acrylic and watercolor, go for acrylic... Watercolor is a tricky beast, and it's harder to control than acrylic.

    Although personally I found oils were the easiest to learn with... I'd been using acrylics before I tried oils, and found acrylic a little frustrating, partly because it dried too fast for me and partly because the color would shift when it dried. With oil, it felt more like the paint did what I wanted it to.

    Though some people like acrylic just fine, so your mileage may vary. And I think newer acrylics don't change color as much (not sure, but that's what I've heard?) And acrylic is pretty affordable, so if you try it and it all turns into a huge mess, it's no great loss...

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  14. #51
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    Don't forget to prep the paper for watercolor if you decide to use that medium.
    Oh the sad stories of hilly paper artworks...

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