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  1. #16
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    ugh, I've been trying contribute to this for a day and half but the site kept logging me out when I tried posting...
    [sigh]


    Anyways,

    Visual communication and information hierarchy

    Concept design is about effectively communicating an idea or concept through drawings to a client (customer, development team, model render etc). It doesn't need to be super polished, it just needs to present enough information that they get the gist of the personality, mood and/or purpose.

    Illustration is storytelling through a limited setting, you get one image to explain it all. Concept design is also storytelling, but it allows a broader level of detail to be examined, since it is not limited to a single scene.

    When it comes to details, what's expected will vary on the nature of the project (a 1st-person racing game will have different deliverables than a 360° 3rd-person adventure game).

    Information hierarchy is how you determine what are the key factors, what is essential to convey the idea so that a client will 'get it' by looking with little to no verbal explanation.

    This is true in all Design, not just Concept but don't limit yourself to digital medium. Inspiration can strike at any moment, and conversations with clients might not always happen near a computer. The ability to quickly and visually communicate an idea with them can be as simple as a pen & napkin drawing.

    If you're concerned about rapid ideation, that it takes you too long on a concept sketch, try this: it's a drawing exercise to teach how to prioritize core details of an idea or object versus the polish that can bog us down (like drawing every scale on a mermaid character).

    Do a still life/drawing study of an object in your house (not an apple, something with a little more detail like a car or a shoe), or take a previously refined concept you have.

    Take 3 hours to render it up, use whatever medium your comfortable with and give us as much detail as possible.

    Next, draw it again, but this time in 30 mins.

    Do it one last time, but only in 3 mins.

    The commitment to detail should get simpler with less time, but it should also make you consider what is essential in conveying this idea or object to us.


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  4. #17
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    Thanks Inferno for your participation. I´ll try the exercise you´ve proposed me.

    I´ve been trying to paint without too much zoom in and you are right, there´s no reason to zoom in at 200% in all the painting because this takes too much time that could be used to make more visual ideas and variations


    Thank you guys and continue !!

  5. #18
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    On the primary details that you're really pushing its ok to polish and make them look good. Things like faces and hands are usually good to linger over a little longer also. But when you zoom in to get the detailing right, make sure to zoom out to see if the overall effect is consistent and working for you. If it doesn't look good zoomed out you've got a problem. The thumb sized view allows you to check the overall design elements. If the design is off your work won't be convincing.


  6. #19
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    Yeah, I´ve been noticed about that, thank you for your collaboration

    I want to talk again about the portfolio topic..... If I want that my Photoshop artwork looks good on a printed page, what zoom percentage should I maintain generally along the painting process ??

    I don´t want to work on a page at, for example, 28% pixels of zoom and once printed, see that the image is not enough detailed because It´s smaller than I believed.
    I tried to test it on my own screen. I printed the image I posted above, and making a right click on the PS workspace I observed that the printed page and the image on the screen are the same when I select " Fit to screen". Maybe It would be the answer to my question but I want to be ensure that It´s not a coincidence related with my screen size.


    Thank you !!

  7. #20
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    There really isn't a good answer for this. I'd suggest making whatever you're painting as large as possible on the screen, but small enough that you can still see the whole thing. That is for roughing everything in.

    When it comes time to polish everything up then you zoom in. The amount all depends on how tight you want it to look when you're finished. However you still need to check the thumbnail view often to make sure that you're helping not hurting the overall impact of the work.


  8. #21
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    Someone might answer to always use a resolution of 300dpi at least and then choose the format in height and width (based on what you've been asked to do or what format you need). Some others (like me too) might answer to not bother about this (unless your customer is giving you a specific input about) because of their working habit.

    You have to learn what kind of details you can achieve in specific resolutions and when you need to res up for very tiny details. The worst thing you can do is to start a piece with a huge resolution for no reason because of course that is going to slow down your workstation (raising the potential risk of crashes) and more important a huge resolution for no reason can distract you from the overall aspect of the image (cause the more you can zoom, the more you'll be tempted to), fading into painting little details when you haven't finished the composition yet (i have a post it to remember this bad habit on my screen ).

  9. #22
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    Yeah, thanks guys for your continued help. Ok, I´ll try to maintain myself far away from the "zoom in too much" temptation.

    I´ve been making variations of the image I put few days ago, and working without too much zoom in, and you are right. The three images look similar, but I made the new ones in 20-30 minutes (considering that I changed only the upper part):


    Question about portfolios


    Thank you

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