Art: How do you create pores in skin with clay?

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  1. #1
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    How do you create pores in skin with clay?

    I have been collecting 1/6 figures and there getting better every day its seems.So i feel there is a break through in getting likeness with pores and wrinkles but i cant imagine how?
    thanks for comments

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    For pores:
    1) Cover clay with saran wrap.
    2) Make a hard mold of the skin on an orange. Use this mold as a "stamp" to make pores.

    Wrinkles are drawn on carefully using tools then smoothed our using solvents. The saran wrap helps make it look more natural by making any indentations smooth.

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  5. #3
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    That was great info but what about smaller scale , 1/6 scale the pores would be to big

    pic for idea, 12" figure
    How do you create pores in skin with clay?

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  6. #4
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    The head was probably sculpted in hard wax wich requires a slightly different approach, but fine skin pores can be done in most clays as well.
    I dont know what kind of clay you're using, so a detailed guide probably wouldnt help much, there are two methods that will work in almost any material though:

    a) Strategically poke around with a toothbrush or any brush with stiff bristles. Soften the surface before and/or smooth it out after, depending on the material.

    b) Same as a) just with a little sanding pad. Works like a charm on wax (heat up the pad over the torch), but I'm sure you can get reasonable results in clay as well.

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    im sure some one else would know better but i would say thats probably a scanned head or one sculpted in zbrush then printed out i know a few machines can print out increably fine detail.
    end of the day the only real answer is practice .... i have seen a lot of people just try and copy methods shown on youtube and other places without understanding how skin works and they never get as good a result as they could so just look at skin use small tools (i use dental tools but you can get great effects with just a toothpic) and practice practice practice

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  10. #6
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    You're absolutely right, it's all about practice, but it does help to know how and what to do Mastering it is a different story indeed...

    But to keep speculations out: The head was sculpted by Yulli and according to the interwebs she uses the heated sponge / sanding pad method I mentioned above. ( http://www.statueforum.com/showthread.php?t=97732 )

    Hope that helps.

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  12. #7
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    That Nicholson Joker piece is waaaaay overtextured, in my opinion. I wouldn't use something like that as a model. As Kilh said, the standard method for skin texture that's too small to individually sculpt is to stipple with a bush, then smooth. Different types and stiffnesses of brush, and different degrees of smoothing, will give different effects.


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  14. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    That Nicholson Joker piece is waaaaay overtextured, in my opinion.
    Agreed. Looks like a bad case of psoriasis

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  16. #9
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    Thanks for all this output , thats why i love this site!!He is over done IMO , i didn't understand poking away at a sculpted face wouldn't totally mess it up if you did it wrong once.I mean the face is very nice and if i was poking at the final piece would freak me out.

    But thanks all of you!!!!1

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  17. #10
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    I use a wire brush...


    Mah ' Crub

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    As for the complaints about the Joker's over-done/over-textured face, I simply thought that the sculptor was showing the right texture: that is what someone's face looks like when it's completely covered in pancake powder-style makeup.

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