Page 1 of 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 175

Thread: So many child prodigies, do I even have a chance?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    190
    Thanks
    40
    Thanked 54 Times in 50 Posts

    Unhappy So many child prodigies, do I even have a chance?

    Hello CA,

    have to make up a thread of worries and fears again. xD

    When browsing DeviantART and CA, i almost feel like the majority of the full developed, professionals are underaged. Many of them are even Pro at the age of 16, if not they are when they're 18 at least. And the "slowest" are like 19 or 20.
    I have started to work hard on my skills when being at the end of 19, almost 20. I know I could shoot myself for that since I've drawn cince I'm 12, but NOT SERIOUSLY enough.
    However, since all of those "child prodigies" it feels like i never can establish as an illustrator. i lack the money to get myself an education as an illustrator so I have to teach myself all the time.
    I am currently 21 years and 4 months old, my drawings are still like noob garbage and I feel like I'm going to be forced living as a burger-flipping someone.
    Currently i live on some small work so I have enough time for practicing drawing and I'm lucky enough my parents also help me out. But not until forever...
    Still, these underaged pro's seem to make a living on their stuff. (they live my dream- that's a ton of motivation to me but also a ton of hopelessness).

    That said, I want to know if any of you might be familiar with that and if there's even a chance for such old people like me who are still not pro at all...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Lux_Aeterna For This Useful Post:


  4. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    2,715
    Thanks
    2,951
    Thanked 1,821 Times in 939 Posts
    lol Deviantart...

    Anyway, stop comparing yourself to others. Skilled children have been around
    in every creative industry since such industries came about.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lux_Aeterna View Post
    That said, I want to know if any of you might be familiar with that and if there's even a chance for such old people like me who are still not pro at all...
    21 years old? You are still a kid.

    Focus on your studies, push yourself hard, submit your work for crits. You've been on CA long enough to know the methodology for improvement
    and believe me it works.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Star Eater For This Useful Post:


  6. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    The Internet
    Posts
    195
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 127 Times in 87 Posts
    Have fun drawing! But really, do you want to be a pro because you want to be great at drawing, or do you want to be great at drawing so you can afford something to eat and shelter? If it's the latter, there are much better options than art, and if it's the former then you'll be able to improve a ton anyways. You don't have to draw for a living to improve, nobody was born a professional.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to yochanan For This Useful Post:


  8. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Posts
    38
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 9 Times in 6 Posts
    In your case I don't think you should judge the person on their age. See everyone as an "artist" regardless.

    I believe that if you work really hard then you'll surely achieve what others achieve. Just never give up on art if you are sure that it's what you really like. I have seen many great artists who never had a degree or education in art before.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    HELLsinki, Finland
    Posts
    4,853
    Thanks
    345
    Thanked 2,690 Times in 1,647 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Lux_Aeterna View Post
    the majority of the full developed, professionals are underaged
    Yeah because underaged kids usually get lots of jobs in the industry. I don't know, maybe I just don't browse around DA as much as I used to, but I don't really recall little kids who actually did art for living outside some DA commissions or con stuff.
    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
    Comic!
    Sketchbook (Critiques, no compliments please.)
    Tumblr
    Website
    Livejournal
    DeviantArt
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to TinyBird For This Useful Post:


  11. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    46
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 15 Times in 7 Posts
    I'm 21 myself, about to turn 22 and I know very well why you're feeling like this, but now let's look a bit back into the past and look at a certain artist, for example a very good one in my opinion is: Syd Mead. The old fellow is 78 by now, assuming Wikipedia is right, he first started working in the professional industry at age 26, now don't get all messed up in your mind thinking that your goal is to be a pro within 5 years from now, like some stated above me, enjoy drawing.

    Sure, I want to be in the games industry myself amongst the big names making concept drawings on a daily basis, sure there are kids who are better in drawing and are 5 years younger, sure there's probably a kid right now who's 16 y/o and works for some major company, so what? If you don't want to be a burgerflipper, then stop complaining on this forum and instead spend your time drawing, you want to see improvements? Then work for it, it's what I'm doing right now (besides this forum post, haha.)

    Find professionals who can criticize your art, draw everyday, I don't care if you draw penises all day, just DRAW, and if you don't have any inspiration, then let that be for now and draw from life, you'll improve your own technique and you can find inspiration later on. What's the use on having inspiration if you can't draw in the first place? That's what I have learned these past days. Draw when you're traveling, draw when you're waiting, draw when you're taking a dump, draw if you can't fall asleep, even if it's just 5 mere minutes, DRAW. You want to be pro? Then you better start working on becoming one.

    Oh and a few good hints that I've told myself, which I would love to share with you:
    - Screw DeviantArt, you're only wasting time on it browsing images that teach you nothing.
    - Want inspiration? Go outside, you life in Germany and you guys have more nature in your country then I have in The Netherlands, I wish I could swap.
    - Read tutorials related to your interests.
    - When you see somebody better than you, go and have a chat with them and ask about how they produce their work, most artists are willing to help each other out even if it's just a little bit, you might learn something from them.
    - I don't care how full your bag will be with whatever junk you bring along, ALWAYS and I repeat ALWAYS bring your sketchbook along!
    - and last but not least, don't fear your future, work in the present, because that's what makes tomorrow.

    I'm out, time to draw some damn cubes! Oh and if anybody doesn't agree on whatever I've posted, suit yourself. Currently, this is what works for me.

    -Redystra out.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Redystra For This Useful Post:


  13. #7
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,684 Times in 5,022 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Lux_Aeterna View Post
    When browsing DeviantART and CA, i almost feel like the majority of the full developed, professionals are underaged. Many of them are even Pro at the age of 16, if not they are when they're 18 at least. And the "slowest" are like 19 or 20.
    Uhmmm...






    No.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. The Following 24 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  15. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 748 Posts
    Yeah, I don't think I've ever seen anyone a pro at that age...
    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Andrew Sonea For This Useful Post:


  17. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    967
    Thanks
    656
    Thanked 481 Times in 315 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Sonea View Post
    Yeah, I don't think I've ever seen anyone a pro at that age...
    I think this is just a point of view (not in general, but how the threadstarter meant it)
    I was just looking at this one yesterday: http://sakimichan.deviantart.com/
    20 years old, pictures date back to when she was 16. This is "pro" to me, while she is not a professional.

    And what is this obsession with MindCandyMans sketchbook all the time? ALL THE TIME!
    Yes, when I see page 1 and then his latest pieces, it is stunning indeed- I don't want to downplay his commitment and achievements at all. It definitely shows it is not impossible to develop from not being able to draw a straight line to this.
    But I can't find any motivation from the fact that he apparently had the time to study up to 10hrs a day(see his posts pages 20-24). That is not a choice but a luxury in my view. Plus that he is actually part of a studio, has a teacher, ... Can people please offer additional information for thick people like me, where exactly his Sketchbook is motivating?
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  18. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to LordLouis For This Useful Post:


  19. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,338
    Thanks
    533
    Thanked 527 Times in 304 Posts
    With good time management, it is possible to study 10 hours a day.
    Last edited by Flashback; April 18th, 2012 at 10:25 AM.
    *** Sketchbook and other stuff ***

    Flashback's SB

    Anatomy Atlas

    Digital Galleries

    Visit & Support:
    http://www.ctrlpaint.com/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  20. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    127
    Thanks
    60
    Thanked 93 Times in 53 Posts
    There are a lot of teenage artists making money online from commissions, which I am sure is what the OP means. That's certainly not the same thing as making a living from art and probably not what anyone here means when they talk about being "pro", but nevertheless being paid for art means you are a professional artist.

    Now, OP, I have been in exactly your position and I can assure you that it is nothing new, because when I was 21 and having exactly this issue it was ten years ago. Though I do think this phenomenon of great young talent has always existed in every creative industry, I also think the internet has accelerated this trend because it makes such amazing learning materials available to everyone that anyone with determination and drive can become a good artist without having to go to an expensive school to do it. I have to tell you that, as an older artist, I feel that it is precisely your generation which benefits from this and that you are very lucky to have access to such things at such a young age! I understand that 21 might feel like a pivotal age because it is considered the age of graduation and legal maturity, but what that actually means is that you are at the beginning. You are lucky to know where you want to go professionally at 21. I didn't have the courage or confidence in my art even to go to art college until I was 25, and I graduated from my art-related degree at 28. My work was good and I felt confident when I graduated - until I discovered that art skills were only half of the skillset a professional artist needs. I spent the last three years working in sales while I worked on my art part time. As it happens, I handed in my notice two weeks ago because I finally reached the point where I feel I can make a living with my art. I'm 31.

    Horrifying as this might sound to the idealistic young person dreaming of doing what they love for a living from the get-go, this path is not in the least unusual. I suggest you go and read biographies of some of the great artists working in the game and film industries today (or whatever industry fits you). You will find that few to none of them jumped out of college and landed anywhere remotely near where they currently are. Most of them worked "flipping burgers" or in other industries while they built their craft to the kind of level which got them to where they are. There are certainly a few "godlike talent" exceptions and there always will be, but they are exceptions and not the rule. I would even go so far as to say that if you are going to work in an industry like this you need some life experience first or you are just going to fail at it. Unless you have the kind of personality which makes you a natural salesperson/businessperson, when you come out of college you aren't going to have the professional skills you need to succeed yet. I know I didn't, though the job I have had for the last three years taught them to me. Being an artist is tough because it takes years to learn great skill, and life doesn't wait for you while you learn it. If you waver when life prevents obstacles to you (such as the need to earn a living when your art isn't good enough for people to pay you for it yet) it will just weed you out as one of those who didn't have what it took to make it. Many of those young artists you think are so talented are going to be weeded out by the same process. In the world of school and college it might seem like skill and talent are the only measuring factors for success, but believe me, that is far from true.

    If you are bothered by this issue, you're not operating in the right mindset to be successful as an artist. So put your focus somewhere it's going to benefit you - that is, on your own progress. Comparing yourself to others is useless because there is no such thing as a fair comparison - you don't know what has brought them to where they are nor what life will throw at them in the future. You don't know what life will bring to you either.

    Chill out, keep drawing, and stop putting a time limit on success.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  21. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Birkeley For This Useful Post:


  22. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    2,715
    Thanks
    2,951
    Thanked 1,821 Times in 939 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Birkeley View Post
    but nevertheless being paid for art means you are a professional artist.
    I don't think so. While some people may say that their profession is art, unless they are actually employed full time
    or have been employed as an artist by a company, you cannot actually call yourself a professional. That's the way I see it.
    I don't know if that's necessarily right though. If that is actually what you meant, then I agree with you.

    I'm an amateur freelancer. I've worked for several South African publishing houses, but I would never describe myself as a professional.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  23. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    The Internet
    Posts
    195
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 127 Times in 87 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by LordLouis View Post
    I think this is just a point of view (not in general, but how the threadstarter meant it)
    I was just looking at this one yesterday: http://sakimichan.deviantart.com/
    20 years old, pictures date back to when she was 16. This is "pro" to me, while she is not a professional.

    And what is this obsession with MindCandyMans sketchbook all the time? ALL THE TIME!
    Yes, when I see page 1 and then his latest pieces, it is stunning indeed- I don't want to downplay his commitment and achievements at all. It definitely shows it is not impossible to develop from not being able to draw a straight line to this.
    But I can't find any motivation from the fact that he apparently had the time to study up to 10hrs a day(see his posts pages 20-24). That is not a choice but a luxury in my view. Plus that he is actually part of a studio, has a teacher, ... Can people please offer additional information for thick people like me, where exactly his Sketchbook is motivating?
    He started when he was 23 years old and I don't see how drawing 10 hours a day makes it LESS motivating. Take away the time most people spend watching television, playing video games, hanging out with friends and all the other excuses and I bet you very few won't have PLENTY of time to draw. It is a choice when you give up other things for it, everyone has 24 hours in a day, but most of us don't spend them as wisely as we could.

    The majority of people waste a lot of time working more than they really have to (I don't know where you got the impression that he was in some kind of luxurious position to work more than the average person without sacrificing something else?) and on other hobbies, or just waste time. If you're not motivated by someone who went from never having drawn to a pro level without being a one-in-a-million talent simply because he went to an atelier and actually dedicated a lot of time to it every day (over a period of many years), then I'd love to hear what kind of people do motivate you.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  24. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to yochanan For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 14 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Do I have a chance?
    By hippl5 in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: February 25th, 2008, 12:09 AM
  2. Can't I have one more chance
    By Krystallwolvelt in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: August 9th, 2006, 11:48 AM
  3. Do I have much of a chance getting into SVA?
    By Dara1409 in forum ART SCHOOLS & ART EDUCATION
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: June 8th, 2006, 04:17 AM
  4. Last Chance
    By juliusbernard in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: January 27th, 2006, 10:42 AM
  5. Art: My Last Chance
    By RobG in forum FINISHED ART & ARTWORK
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: August 22nd, 2005, 04:19 PM

Members who have read this thread: 8

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook