When do you step away/give up on a painting?

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: When do you step away/give up on a painting?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    110
    Thanks
    52
    Thanked 18 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    When do you step away/give up on a painting?

    Hey CA, I am a digital hobbyist and I have an nit-picking problem.

    I know I have to practice to get my images where I want them to be, and I do gesture sketches and draw from my loomis book every week. With digital artwork though, I always seem to get strung up on each piece until I finish it. Even if it's an image I don't care about, one that's for fun or practice, I'll get hooked. I tell myself "Oh this is just for shits. I want to practice (insert anything)." Thirty hours later I'll still be redoing a hang nail on the left thumb. It won't even be that great.

    It's really holding me back. I'm not sure if there or some secret, maybe I just need to commiserate, but how do other artists just tell themselves it isn't working? Has anyone else had this problem?

    Sketchbook.
    DeviantArt.
    Follow Me On Tumblr!

    “Success consists of getting up just one more time than you fall.” -Oliver Goldsmith

    "I'm sick of following my dreams. I'm just going to ask them where they're goin', and hook up with them later. " -Mitch Hedberg
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    45
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 29 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Save your work as different files constantly, step back and look where you previously were. This helps you to see at which point you've started to relentlessly polish (and stopped learning) and began to drain life from the work.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    760
    Thanks
    657
    Thanked 368 Times in 245 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Work on multiple paintings at the same time. When you get frustrated with one move to another. Often a fresh perspective is all you need.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Shorinji_Knight For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,899 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Sorry...the two replies so far are BS and don't address the problem. OK, maybe BS is too strong, but they miss the entire gist of the problem.

    A "good" painting comes from a solid understanding of fundamental principles, they have to be there from the start. These fundamentals are literally, and figuratively, the foundation of the image and must be established at the very beginning of the process. If the foundation is weak, the image will suffer.

    So the answer to the question "when do you give up on a painting?" is right from the start. If something isn't working or doesn't feel right I wipe it off and start over. If I'm further along on a piece and something feels/looks wrong I scrape off that passage and restate it.

    A good rule to live by is never let something wrong stay. Every mark, every passage, every effect, should work together, building the image in the direction you want to take it. If you're lucky enough there are rare occasions where the painting literally tells you what it needs and where...this trippy place is akin to writers whose characters tell them what they will do next, sometimes to the complete surprise of the writer.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    If you're lucky enough there are rare occasions where the painting literally tells you what it needs and where...this trippy place is akin to writers whose characters tell them what they will do next, sometimes to the complete surprise of the writer.
    Just had to say I really dig that analogy, having experienced both phenomena on occasion.

    (More often with writing, though. I wish it would happen as often with painting.) (Or maybe not... I get the situations where a character does something unexpected and adds 20 pages to the plot. If that happened in a painting, I'd get a painting telling me it needs something that'll add 20 hours of work...)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to QueenGwenevere For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    California/Singapore
    Posts
    492
    Thanks
    49
    Thanked 269 Times in 173 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When I've solved all the problems that need solving. Or more simply put, when there is literally nothing else I can do to address the key issues in the painting, such as intention, read, clarity, balance, and so on.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. The Following User Says Thank You to Cadaure For This Useful Post:


  12. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    717
    Thanks
    932
    Thanked 291 Times in 208 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    Just had to say I really dig that analogy, having experienced both phenomena on occasion.

    (More often with writing, though. I wish it would happen as often with painting.) (Or maybe not... I get the situations where a character does something unexpected and adds 20 pages to the plot. If that happened in a painting, I'd get a painting telling me it needs something that'll add 20 hours of work...)
    That'd be really annoying. I imagine being halfway through a painting and then it tells me it needs a bigger canvas.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    86
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 23 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I know how it feels. I tend to go to much in to details too even though i promised my self I wouldn't. To avoid it I try to work with big brushes and not zoom in to much, this makes it hard to work on tiny details which does nothing for the overall finished piece. Also since I'm working on a crappy laptop I cant work on to big paintings (and texture brushes are slow which is really annoying, I really need to get a better one soon) but that too makes it hard to render forever.

    My Sketchbook http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=239346


    -In the beginning there was nothing, which exploded.-
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Newbury, UK
    Posts
    266
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 94 Times in 59 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    when you stop drawing and start fiddling.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to cro-magnon For This Useful Post:


  16. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Mölndal, Sweden
    Posts
    2,778
    Thanks
    2,379
    Thanked 1,911 Times in 832 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you find yourself scratching your head over something. Stop what you're doing and go do some studies of the subject to try and figure out what you're missing. Maybe find some reference. Then come back and do it over again.

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

    Sketchy Link

    Portfolio
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Slothboy3000 View Post
    That'd be really annoying. I imagine being halfway through a painting and then it tells me it needs a bigger canvas.
    ARGH, THIS HAS HAPPENED TO ME. Got about a third of the way done on a painting, stepped back to take a look, realized "you know, this really needs a few more inches on the sides... and the top... and the bottom..."

    Scrapped it, started over on a bigger canvas.

    Actually, it turned out better the second time. Things usually do.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,830
    Thanks
    2,627
    Thanked 1,044 Times in 681 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    Just had to say I really dig that analogy, having experienced both phenomena on occasion.

    (More often with writing, though. I wish it would happen as often with painting.) (Or maybe not... I get the situations where a character does something unexpected and adds 20 pages to the plot. If that happened in a painting, I'd get a painting telling me it needs something that'll add 20 hours of work...)
    That's when you take that extra and put in another file!



    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    160
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 63 Times in 47 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I recently tore a failed painting off the stretcher bars and threw it away. I could almost feel the weight being lifted off my shoulders as it went in the trash! I've learned that if I F up the initial stages, there's really no saving it and I need to just move on or I'll drive myself nuts.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to Blackthorne For This Useful Post:


  21. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Williston, Vermont
    Posts
    550
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 156 Times in 102 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Seems that you're getting hung up on the details, rather than focusing on the entire painting (as a whole). For me, I tend to not work over multiple areas of a painting, at the same time. When I find that I'm having some issues (usually due to drawing or incorrect values), I scrape off that part, step back and then try to resolve it. If I can't resolve it, I then move to other parts of the painting (freeing my mind from obsessing on that part of the problem).

    When I'm ready, I go back to the issue that I had. If I still can't resolve it, I do some drawing studies and wait for the next day (to come back to the painting).

    Usually, for me, It's easier to see my mistakes the next day (after my mind has rested).

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •