Questions? x.x

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    Questions? x.x

    Hello guys, I'm Shirudo.
    I got a problem, as well as some questions.
    I'm a high school student, 15 years old this year. I really liked drawing, however, I think I'm only a casual drawer from 2 years ago untill now. I wanted to start improving myself from now onwards, and to learn proper drawing techniques etc. And, afterwards go on to College Of Arts if possible. I'm not sure if I have the talent or ability to do so, but the only that I'm sure is that I have the passion for it, and I would work hard.
    So, can anyone please help me by giving me a guide on how to start doing this?

    Thankyou, sorry if I posted this on the wrong thread. x.x

    Cheers,
    Shirudo

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    Start a sketchbook here. Post work, comment on other SBs. Read a lot of the stickies. Expore the site - there is tons of helpful information here. Have fun.

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    The best way to improve is to draw a lot of course. But if you need some help with basics there are a lot of books out there. Problem is there are so many it can be hard to choose.

    I found these books to be quite useful:
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Drawing-Scen...4487774&sr=8-1

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Drawing-Head...4487814&sr=1-7

    One thing that will definitely help is just collecting the artwork of your favorite artists and study how they do it - this can be from books or if you dont have the money just google their artwork. If you can get your hands on their pencil sketches, these are usually very good to study, because you can actually see the drawing process in those much more than in finished works.

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    Start to draw, draw anything you can, draw from real life: what you have have on your table, go out into the public; draw after references: humans, animals, cars, anything; do gesture studies, learn human antomy. Create a sketchbook, post up what you have.

    Gesture studies: http://quickposes.com/

    Standard anatomy books for artisist are Bridgman and Loomis:

    http://www.amazon.com/Constructive-A...ref=pd_sim_b_3

    http://www.amazon.com/Figure-Drawing...ref=pd_sim_b_3

    If you search a bit you will find the Loomis books on the net.

    Cheers.

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    Thanks for the great replies!
    Between, I wanted to ask if you all sketches fast and uses drawing techniques, or slow and uses drawing technique?
    And, do I have to sketch fast, is it important?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shirudo View Post
    Thanks for the great replies!
    Between, I wanted to ask if you all sketches fast and uses drawing techniques, or slow and uses drawing technique?
    And, do I have to sketch fast, is it important?
    Speed in drawing comes with experience. Further, some people prefer working quickly, some people prefer working slowly. You will find out your own preference as you gain more experience.
    Also, sketching fast only becomes important when you are drawing things that are moving quickly, or when you are working for someone who is imposing unreasonable deadlines on you.

    As the ego shrinks, so the spirit expands.
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    Thankyou!
    I have that thought because I've seen some sketchbooks in here that looks like they're being speed sketched, like the linings and etc. So, I began wondering to myself if they speed sketches it anot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shirudo View Post
    Between, I wanted to ask if you all sketches fast and uses drawing techniques, or slow and uses drawing technique?
    There is a time for fast and there is a time for slow. There is gesture, quick notes on the model to nail the pose, which are fast, anywhere from 10 seconds to 5 minutes, and there is sketching moving people, which will be fast, unless you nail them first.

    There is line quality, for instance through blind contours, which need to be done as slowly as you can. There is muscle memory involved here, which is developed through slow deliberate movements. And that is slower than you think.

    There is construction, perspective and anatomy, which is not so much a matter of fast or slow, but they need time to be developed, and if you are the one that needs more time: so be it. These are probably the least artistic topics, have more to do with solid engineering than with original, expressive and creative. Do not rush these.

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    Also, don't be so sure drawings that look like they were done quickly were actually done quickly. I have worked for hours to make a drawing look spontaneous

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    Obviously the faster you can get a finished piece of art done the more you will make just by shear volume of work created. Of course working fast doesn't matter if you don't satisfy the client.

    Drawing and painting are like anything else requiring hand eye motor skills; practice. So I recommend practicing working as fast as you can and then practicing being as accurate as you can be; back and forth to improve the speed and accuracy of your work, just like typing or playing a musical instrument. Style and speed are not necessarily synonymous so don't be fooled by how something looks.

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    Along with others suggesting Loomis and what not. I'd try Glenn Vilppu and his drawing manual. Has a nice interesting approach to just drawing instead of getting bogged down with anatomy when your just starting.

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    Do lots and lots of studies on fundamentals and have a very keen eye. Good Luck!

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    Erm, one more questions? x.x
    Is there a definite way of holding a pencil when drawing? I hold my pencil like the way I hold it when I write things, and hold it sideways when shading. Am I doing it wrong? o.o

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shirudo View Post
    Erm, one more questions? x.x
    Is there a definite way of holding a pencil when drawing? I hold my pencil like the way I hold it when I write things, and hold it sideways when shading. Am I doing it wrong? o.o
    I guess people would have an intense debate about this*- as a beginner I find this very helpful: http://chiseledrocks.com/main/musing...old_the_pencil

    It is shaky and crappy at first but you will get used to it quickly. Especially when life drawing using an easel I found it very helpful.

    *If you watch videos of professionals that hold the pencil like a writing instrument, you will see that they still draw with a locked wrist.

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  18. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shirudo View Post
    Erm, one more questions? x.x
    Is there a definite way of holding a pencil when drawing? I hold my pencil like the way I hold it when I write things, and hold it sideways when shading. Am I doing it wrong? o.o
    There are many ways. Those are two of them.


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    Questions? x.x

    I have questions again, hahahah, sorry if I keep asking questions. The above picture is I learnt from Glenn Vilppu Drawing Manual, it's about getting the gesture of the figure. The above picture is the one I drew, but I find it hard to do so, as well as find my drawings weird. The manual emphasized on not looking at the models body lines and draw it exactly, it told us to think about the action, the lines have to convey the sense of action in your subject by themselves, to do so we must draw the line that continues after one another. However, I do not understand the action that the manual told me to draw it from how I look at it, thus I kept drawing the exact model's bodyline. Please help me as in how to draw it from the perspective of the way of actions I looked at it and from the action of the model when I looked at it and not the exact bodyline of the model.

    Sorry if I make it sound very confusing x.x

    Last edited by Shirudo; April 16th, 2012 at 09:16 AM.
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    Honestly. Forget the human figure for now! Go and get a bunch of shapes. Cubes, spheres, bottles etc. Arrange them on a desk and light them. Now draw these non stop until you can copy what you see exactly in front of you. Keep doing this until it drives you crazy, but only stop once you can do this effortlessly!

    Once you have mastered this go out and draw from life, observe from the real world and draw everything. After you have built-up your drawing muscles then go look at the human figure.

    Good luck.

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    Hmmm, so I have to start out for drawing basic shapes?
    Meaning is it ok that I use 'Andrew Loomis - Fun with a pencil', and after that when I set my fundamentals right after one or two month, I'll start on figure drawing using 'Andrew Loomis - Figure Drawing for all it's worth'' Is that all right?

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    It is ok to use anything that teaches you what you need to learn. You have to decide what is gonna be the most use for you. People with expreance can guide you, but only you know what helps you learn the most. Everbody is different. I personally loved "How to Draw the Marvel Way" it 'worked' for me more than some of the more traditional approaches. Everything/approach has its plus and minuses... all that matters is will it help you understand something that you have a problem with.

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    Hello, it's me again.
    As you know from the first post, I'm a casual drawer from 2 years ago untill now, and working hard to set my fundamentals right with Andrew Loomis's Fun with a pencil book before moving on to his Figure Drawing for all it's worth book.
    Today, my teacher nominated me for a mural painting campaign of my school, and I'm worried about a couple of things. For the ' Fun with a pencil ' book, I've already had difficulty but trying hard to master the circle head structure thing, but I'm afraid that I'm not worth of taking part in that campaign because I've never done painting before, much less studying them with any books. Should I take part in it or not?
    x.x

    Last edited by Shirudo; April 20th, 2012 at 04:50 AM.
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    Why not?

    It's a good opportunity for you to improve. You'll get to meet different artists and learn from each other. Even if you lose, who cares, just use it as a learning experience and work harder! Wish my school has that kind of thing but art is not a really strong subject here.

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