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  1. #1
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    Question Drawing: Born with it or can you learn it?

    Do you think the ability to draw well is a talent that you're born with or is it a skill that you can learn?

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  3. #2
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    The truth of the matter is simple. You aren’t born knowing how to do much more than breath and scream. Everything else is a learned skill
    http://theartorder.com/2012/01/17/miles-of-canvas/

    Learning to see

    "...the ideas are what matter most" Doug Chiang
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  5. #3
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    Ever seen a baby paint a Mona Lisa? No? There you have your answer. It's all about practise, just like with everyting else. Some might have a slightly better sense of perspective or color or be better at observing, but that's all. Nobody, and I mean nobody, can make masterpieces without years and years of practise. Leonardo da Vinci was well over fifty years old when he painted the Mona Lisa.

    So yes, you can learn to draw too, as long as you have the necessary dedication.

    I'm sorry if my post sounds somewhat bitter, but I'm so sick and tired of all whiny kids complaining that they don't have "talent" and whatnot when they never did any serious work to get better. Pick up a paper and a pencil and get drawing! Anyone can do that! Even if you don't have hands, draw with your feet or your mouth!

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  7. #4
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    I suggest you go to this part of the forum: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=41 and find out for yourself.

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  8. #5
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    What kind of ninja doesn't do his research?!

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  10. #6
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    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
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    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
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  12. #7
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    The original classic, thanks. I must be sure to bookmark it
    for the next time one of these pops up.

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  13. #8
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    Thanks for all the replies everyone! Especially EagleGrove. :-)

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  14. #9
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  15. #10
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    prodigies only exist in Math, Music and chess. Beethoven saw a piano and could just play. Leonardo Davinci studied his @#$ off.

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  16. #11
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    Sez you.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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  18. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrantYuhre View Post
    prodigies only exist in Math, Music and chess.
    evidence?

    "Ever seen a baby paint a Mona Lisa? No? There you have your answer."



    sb most art copied to page 1
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  19. #13
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    I posted a long reply on reddit about this, and what "talent" actually is. It doesn't apply to just art, but everything where you see apparent inherent talent. People seemed to enjoy it so I'll repeat it here.

    Talent is a sum of small advantages starting from early childhood. A child that has artistically supportive parents, enough money for art supplies, maybe an art school nearby and friends who share the same interest is much more likely to become and consider themselves "talented" than a child who has very poor eyesight, who's neither parent has ever drawn anything, don't support the kid artistically and can't afford art supplies. By the time these kids know what "talent" means the advantaged kid is tens or even hundreds of hours of practice ahead of the other kid without neither of them knowing what "practice" means. On their first art class, one of the kids will already know what to do with the colored waxy sticks and produce a very nice drawing and is praised by their teacher, while the other will scratch their head and go back to playing football. Because of his positive experience with art, the advantaged kid will likely participate in creating art in the future too and will get even more ahead. The other one will think he is not talented so it's impossible for him to learn. At the age of 14, the kid that was drawing 30 minutes every couple of days will be 1277 hours ahead just because it has always been a small part of his life in one way or another.

    It doesn't apply to just art, but on anything where some are seemingly naturally better at it than others. It's a snowball effect that starts right after birth and continues until you do something about it. I agree that not everyone can be the next Da Vinci but that isn't because of some genetic anomaly but because of a very special set of conditions and opportunities presented to him. In a sense, yes, the talented kid is naturally advantaged but not in an absolute sense that the word "talent" implies. It's a small but very important difference and it's a shame that such a misconception is so engrained to everyone's minds. If you believe all your life you will never be able to do something, it doesn't matter that the opportunity is sitting right in front of your nose.

    I can recommend a couple of good books that expand on this. First one is "Talent is Overrated" by Geoff Colvin and the second one is "Outliers" by Malcolm Gladwell.
    link to reddit

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