Art: Sacred Spring
 
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Thread: Sacred Spring

  1. #1
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    Sacred Spring

    Hey everyone! If you’ve been keeping up with the blog, you may remember that my solo show at the Modern Eden Gallery is coming up soon. Along with what I’ve done with the Natural Patterns series I am also working on this series to show with each other.

    Click here to RSVP for the opening reception!

    Process and concept

    This model posed for me in front of a large window surrounded by natural light reflected from multiple angles. It makes this really interesting diffused back lighting. I pretty much improvised the flower head-dress for her to model with. As I went through the photos for the shoot, I cherry-picked the ones that would make the best compositions.

    I wasn’t quite satisfied with just the figure against such a minimal background as a concept, so I wanted some sort of interesting decoration around her. An Art Nouveau motif seemed like a good fit for her costume, and I had happened to come across the Jugendstil magazine Ver Sacrum, a short-lived yet highly influential periodical created by the likes of Gustav Klimt amongst other greatly skilled designers. I love design from that period, and I wanted to create something that pays homage to the influence yet bringing my own style to it.

    As I was coming up with the names for these, I wanted to know what Ver Sacrum actually referred to. It’s actually Latin for Sacred Spring, which is an ancient Roman ritual. A lot of the mythology tied to it seemed pretty interesting to me. The names have varying degrees of meaning tied directly to it, but I have fun playing with the words to make them into something mysterious.

    “Sabina” 16×20 in. oil on canvas board.
    Sacred Spring
    “Samnia” 16×20 in. oil on canvas board.
    Sacred Spring
    “Aquila” 16×20 in. oil on canvas board.
    Sacred Spring
    “Evocation” 16×20 in. oil on canvas board.
    Sacred Spring
    “Votum” 16×20 in. oil on canvas board.
    Sacred Spring
    These smaller pieces were done on watercolor paper mounted to board with water-mixable oils. I’m still having fun with them. The main issue I’ve had with them is that the white paint is way too transparent for me. Apparently you can mix gouache into the Holbein Duo paints, at least that’s what I’ve read. I might need to do that, at least for the oils.
    Sacred Spring
    Sacred Spring
    Sacred Spring
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    Sacred Spring
    Speaking of transparent whites, I posted this on Facebook as well, but I am really liking Transparent White as a color to lighten other mixtures. It doesn’t overpower the other colors like Titanium White would, it gives you much more control if you just want to step up the values a bit. Hope that’s a good tip for some of you out there.

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    Last edited by Main Loop; April 7th, 2012 at 12:04 AM.
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  3. #2
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  4. #3
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    Fantastic paintings, light is incredible!

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  5. #4
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    hella nice paintings!

    Please Sir, I'd like some more.

    www.rogersewardart.com

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  6. #5
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    Wow man! Love the Art Nouveau style you've put to these.

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  7. #6
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    My eyes find the smaller ones more successful, most likely due to the much softer, more evocative edges and the broader brush strokes.

    It may be the photography, but it appears the canvas texture gets in the way of some of the larger ones. Edge work in the heads of 3 and 4 make them stand out to me ( in a good way).

    All of the compositions are solid, I've seen a fair share of work that can't pull off the 2d vs. 3d forms; It's nice to see it done right!

    "A drawing is not necessarily academic because it is thorough, but only because it is dead. Neither is a drawing necessarily academic because it is done in what is called a conventional style, any more than it is good because it is done in an unconventional style. The test is whether it has life and conveys genuine feeling."- Harold Speed
    [[Sketchbook]]
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  9. #7
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    Fantastic work! I love how the focus is only on the figures with the background pushed back, yet aesthetically interesting.

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  10. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Pariano View Post
    My eyes find the smaller ones more successful, most likely due to the much softer, more evocative edges and the broader brush strokes.

    It may be the photography, but it appears the canvas texture gets in the way of some of the larger ones. Edge work in the heads of 3 and 4 make them stand out to me ( in a good way).

    All of the compositions are solid, I've seen a fair share of work that can't pull off the 2d vs. 3d forms; It's nice to see it done right!
    Interesting. Yea usually I do the small works first where I work out the problems so that the larger works get stronger as they go larger due to gaining experience. I did it backwards for a few reasons, so I can see why they are stronger to you.

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  11. #9
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    Yeah, this is great. I like it much more then your previous "Natural patterns" series. The light is especially captivating here.

    cheers

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  12. #10
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    These are really great! I agree with The Pariano in that the smaller ones appeal more to my eye. I'm not overly fond of the more intricate background patterns used in the first two, but 3,4,and 5 are very nice (just in terms of background, I think all the figures are pretty damn good).

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