Parents had the "so what do you want to do" talk with me...
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Thread: Parents had the "so what do you want to do" talk with me...

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    Parents had the "so what do you want to do" talk with me...

    So we had the talk last night and while its been two years since
    I left high School and its lots of time to think about what I want to do

    Can you believe it 19 and feeling old Lol
    Parents came to me and asked me what I want to do and when I told
    them either mechanical engineering (all smiles) or art (WTF)
    I was truly shocked and disgusted by the argument.
    " Thats what you want to do for a living drawing fucking cartoons ,
    why dont you do Architecture like your brother?"
    I tried to tell them about other art such as concept art, 3d art, production art , illustration 9 the ones I am interested in) and guess what NO!
    " You will go to college then university and get a normal job like everyone"

    Doctor
    - By the time you leave shcool student loans are sky high and I dont want to go to school for the majority of my youth.

    Lawyer - At a desk all day and being a lawyer isnt like what you see on tv.

    Engineering- the abstract ways of math never clicked with me

    Art truly inspires me and even though I just started learning 5 weeks ago , it has been hard but fun trying to get the basics down and its something I would not mind sitting down 40+ hours doing.

    Tried to make the point of doing what you love vs doing what makes your pockets full.
    But as far as they are concerned its better to be unhappy and cry in a Lambo
    Personally it doesn't matter If I dont get rich from doing art but I do want to live comfortably and I believe strongly that once you do something that you love with all your soul and vigour you will be successful and "happy"

    I would want to go into the game industry , production art , concept art , enviorments , level design , working with 3Ds max etc....
    Areas where I can be really involved.
    What I am planning to do is move to Toronto with my aunt and try to go some sort job so I can split the rent..

    I realise that staying here is not an option so I have to make up my mind either I go all out for what i want or take the easy way out.
    If there is a time I would call myself depressed it would be now...

    ~ Hard work beats wasted talent.

    Doing a little soul searching ^^
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    there's no reason you shouldn't go to university and do a more artistic degree, is there? It certainly cant hurt to have a fine art degree or something. That would be a decent compromise.
    since you are 19 years old, you do not HAVE to do what your parents tell you. I mean, thinking really long term, you could always do that mechanical engineering career, get some money in the bank while doing art as a hobby / a little freelance, then start doing art full time with the knowledge that you will have a financial cushion to fall back on.

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    Art truly inspires me and even though I just started learning 5 weeks ago
    This is your problem and your parents are right.
    You can't convince your parents that you are a good artist when you have nothing to show them. Back up your words with results.

    I remember when I was 13, I told my dad that I wanted to paint covers for books or "draw video games" (it was 1993, there was no modelling then). He looked at me (rightfully) and said "You can do whatever you want, but look at these computers over here...you should learn some computer stuff too".

    At age 13, he supported my artistic interests, but still tried to guide me into other reasonable career paths in case I never panned out to be an artist. At age 13, I drew like most 13 year old kids did (i.e. crappy), so he handled this properly.

    But when I hit 16 and he saw the stuff that I was doing, he FULLY supported me because he knew that I could do it and that I had spent the previous 3 years doing NOTHING by drawing.

    TL;DR: You can't expect your parents to support you in something that you just decided you had a passion for 5 weeks ago. It's their job to look out for you. If you disagree with them, then you need prove you that you have passion for art rather than just a distaste for "regular joe" jobs. If you know you can do it, then nothing your parents will say will matter anyway so do it if it means that much to you. And if you are scared of them, you WILL be destroyed by the industry, because there is a lot more to be scared of than parents if your art doesn't cut it.

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    You know. Its a good idea to have a backup plan, just in case you just can't get a job where you really want to.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty View Post
    This is your problem and your parents are right.
    You can't convince your parents that you are a good artist when you have nothing to show them. Back up your words with results.

    I remember when I was 13, I told my dad that I wanted to paint covers for books or "draw video games" (it was 1993, there was no modelling then). He looked at me (rightfully) and said "You can do whatever you want, but look at these computers over here...you should learn some computer stuff too".

    At age 13, he supported my artistic interests, but still tried to guide me into other reasonable career paths in case I never panned out to be an artist. At age 13, I drew like most 13 year old kids did (i.e. crappy), so he handled this properly.

    But when I hit 16 and he saw the stuff that I was doing, he FULLY supported me because he knew that I could do it and that I had spent the previous 3 years doing NOTHING by drawing.

    TL;DR: You can't expect your parents to support you in something that you just decided you had a passion for 5 weeks ago. It's their job to look out for you. If you disagree with them, then you need prove you that you have passion for art rather than just a distaste for "regular joe" jobs. If you know you can do it, then nothing your parents will say will matter anyway so do it if it means that much to you. And if you are scared of them, you WILL be destroyed by the industry, because there is a lot more to be scared of than parents if your art doesn't cut it.
    So your saying I should do the mechanical engineering course but keep art as a serious hobby and after awhile when the time comes I can prove to them and myself that art is something I can do?

    But I do agree they are just trying to look out of me but that just half the reason
    and I think the rest is just old fashioned ignorance.
    My brother give up athletics , something he loves and turned
    into a pot belly daily grinder at the office because of them.

    I dont fear my parents but I do respect what they have to say
    and art means a lot to me but I dont want to make hasty judgements.



    you could always do that mechanical engineering career, get some money in the bank while doing art as a hobby / a little freelance, then start doing art full time with the knowledge that you will have a financial cushion to fall back on.
    @ Barefoot That seems like a good compromise and I cant
    a significant reason not to.
    I just wonder If I will be able to balance the course and art.

    ~ Hard work beats wasted talent.

    Doing a little soul searching ^^
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    So your saying I should do the mechanical engineering course but keep art as a serious hobby and after awhile when the time comes I can prove to them and myself that art is something I can do?

    But I do agree they are just trying to look out of me but that just half the reason
    and I think the rest is just old fashioned ignorance.
    My brother give up athletics , something he loves and turned
    into a pot belly daily grinder at the office because of them.

    I dont fear my parents but I do respect what they have to say
    and art means a lot to me but I dont want to make hasty judgements.
    Yes, that is exactly what I am saying.
    Art (and athletics, for that matter) is an incredibly difficult career to get into for the average person. Life is what YOU make of it, but the statistics don't lie. Most people get a job in something they deem as menial because at some point in life you have to accept a means to survive. There's nothing wrong with that.

    For some people, it's enough to just go to work, get paid, and raise a family. It's easy to have passion for art and shun that way of life when you are 19 and live with your parents. But when you are couch surfing and your friends and family are tired of letting you live with them, it's time to start paying your bills. This is what your parents (and everyone else) will cal "THE REAL WORLD".

    You need to decide on a career that will allow you to sustain life in "THE REAL WORLD" without having to be a burden on those that love you.

    If you can do that with art? Then do it, don't ask us.
    If you think it's gonna be while before you are good enough? Then find a backup plan and start building a secondary skill.
    If you don't give a shit either way, then do what you want and see what happens. That's life, man.

    It's all about "risk vs. reward".
    It *sounds* like you have passion...but do you have enough passion to survive on art for the rest of your life? Most people on this forum do. Only you can answer that question for yourself and only you can ACT on that passion.

    I have a passion for beer and cheeseburgers and it's given me a good size belly to go for it. Doesn't mean I want to work at a pub, though. So just make sure your passion is in fact the passion to WORK YOUR FUCKING ASS OFF and not just "Boy, I sure do like drawin' pictures!".

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    No offense, but you seem to be a little naive about how easy it will be to become a professional artist. With five weeks experience under your belt what makes you think you are qualified to find a job? You say that you don't want to be rich but want a comfortable life. Well the term 'starving artist' exists for a reason.

    I'm not telling you not to become an artist. I don't know you or your skill set. I know that you are 19, have been out of high school for two years and are apparently just now trying to decide what to do with your life. Be realistic about how difficult it is to make it as a professional artist.

    To paraphrase Joseph Campbell: "Students always ask me if they have what it takes to become an artist. And I always tell them the same thing. Do you have what it takes to keep slaving away at your passion through years and years of rejection, derision and poverty? Can you take choosing not to eat dinner some nights because given the choice between art supplies and mac and cheese you choose paint? Can you take years of people telling you 'you're not good enough, you need to practice more, you need to learn more, they hate your work, you'll never make it, you need to be more realistic.' If you can endure all that, then you have what it takes to be an artist."

    The most beautiful thing we can experience is the
    mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all
    science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who
    can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe,
    is as good as dead: his eyes are closed.
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    If you want an honest opinion. If you just started 5 weeks ago. Then you are likely in complete beginner mode. Art is not a choice you just pick and say "Well I enjoy drawing, I can picture doing this 40+ hours" if you haven't been at it that long. It's something you have to be 100% dedicated to because it's not like other careers where "Oh I learn this, this that, then I'm ready to do the work and someone will hire me".

    It takes, years..... and years.... of intense practice to be even close to ready to be a professional. Taking classes is nothing but a supplement, you'll be studying in your own time far far more than any classes, then once you graduate there's no guarantee at all that you'll get a job. Art all depends on your skills and there's intense competition with people who will have your skills and more.

    You said you want to live comfortably describe that.
    Because your going to likely have to work harder, longer, and for less pay than even the most basic job you could grab with a degree. Not even including the amount of time it's going to take you to get to the point where your payed anyways.

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    Do your folks own a car? Artists design those. Do they go to movies? Artist work on those. Wear clothing? Shoes? The reality is the world is full of opportunity for visually creative people. This is a brief overview of many of the kinds of careers out there for visual artists: Visual Arts Careers. I wrote it up a few years back specifically to share with younger students having this kind of discussion. I actually wrote it up for parents. Feel free to print it out, highlight the specific things you might be interested in, research them, find out about education in those areas, salary ranges, etc. Then have another talk with your folks.

    Dusty is right though as well. Personally I feel that a career in some aspect of visual art or design is just as valid as any other...but you have to expand your, and your parents awareness of what is out there.

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    I actually did go to school for mechanical engineering and switched careers to graphic design.

    At first is brutal, it adds a whole bunch of extra pressure to show not just yourself but everyone that you have what it takes in you and also that your not just nutty and decided to venture into a childish delusion out of thin air. It involves a lot of condescending chats, a lot of look downs and whatnot.

    I´m still working on it, but the attitudes kinda wears down when you start churning out stuff that actually shows skill/knowledge, at least to the point where your work has become something that they at least sure hell as can´t do themselve. Then the pressure is "Ok, now lets see if you can translate that into stable income" and blah blah blah.

    Anyways Tl;DR haters gonna hate, nevermind the bollocks, and all that.

    P.S. I was always biased towards the arts, always did bad at math, phisics and chemistry but awesome at history, literature and art, even in my vocational tests in highschool the 2 main results were designer or historian but was pushed towards was seems like a more square stable path, until i said "fuck this already". I remember always wanting to learn music and got into painting classes but got sign up for sports instead. What i´m getting at is to be sure yourself about your decision making sense, if your right then you can worry later about the rest, also.
    Its not a thing of malice, your parents are probably using their best intentions trying to steer you to what their think is best, before whinning to much about acceptance make sure you put up the effort.

    Last edited by JDSart; March 13th, 2012 at 08:00 PM.
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    And you can follow that up with this article: Ten Most Expensive Living Artists.Granted, at least one recently passed but...I would argue that artists are the highest paid individuals in history for a given piece of work.

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    I found myself in a similar predicament after high school, I could go into art or I could go with mechanical engineering. I thought about it over the summer and decided to go with engineering. That was in 2006, and now fucking FINALLY after all the calculus, differential equations, thermodynamics, vibrations theory (my personal favorite), heat transfer, controls, circuits, statics, dynamics...and every other damn thing under the sun I'm only 2 semesters away from graduating.

    I find myself in the position now where I have enough co-op experience and connections to basically guarantee myself a job when I get out, and with the Auto Industry recovering I can actually expect a relatively high level of job security. I'll have the ability to do what I want in my free time without worrying about putting food on the table.

    Its always a better idea to have a back up plan. Be forewarned though, if you are not truly passionate about engineering, it will suck the very life out of you. I speak from personal experience, there is a good chance that getting an engineering degree will require you to put your artistic aspirations in the back seat for much longer than you would be comfortable with.

    You could always get a mechanical engineering technology degree (its basically ME without the calculus). Your job opportunities will be more limited and you won't make as much money, but its a much easier degree to get.

    Remember, just because you have their attention doesn't mean you have their respect-Dale Gribble (from King of the Hill)
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    My parents: "You can try going into art, just keep focussed in school ok?"

    It was a fair thing to do (I'm glad they steered me that way), but Dusty is right; I only convinced my parents that I wanted this as a career after showing them firstly that I had artwork to show, and secondly that I did eventually get work from it.

    They're just parents worrying about you. Put their worries to rest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wiggum View Post
    Its always a better idea to have a back up plan. Be forewarned though, if you are not truly passionate about engineering, it will suck the very life out of you.
    I always find this odd. What was your backup plan for engineering? What backup plans would you recommend for other professions?

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    Quote Originally Posted by wiggum View Post
    Be forewarned though, if you are not truly passionate about engineering, it will suck the very life out of you. I speak from personal experience, there is a good chance that getting an engineering degree will require you to put your artistic aspirations in the back seat for much longer than you would be comfortable with.
    I second this. Its not a friendly career to force your way into just because you want the degree. I worked my ass off, and soon i already hated it all, my head hurt after each class, barely slept. Friends who studied less than i did told me all the time how they didn´t understand how i was barely passing or failing the tests when i was trying so bad and they had a more comfortable time getting better scores.

    I could have kept pushing at the momment i quit, but i´m sure at some point i would have either be filtered out as the level started rising above my capacity or go insane, i was the most painfully deppresed than i have ever been during the time i spent studying there, and my self steem plummeted to dangerously low levels.

    “Everybody is a genius. But if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will live its whole life believing that it is stupid.”
    ― Albert Einstein

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    I always find this odd. What was your backup plan for engineering? What backup plans would you recommend for other professions?
    I don't think it's necessarily odd. I had several careers I had thought about before I went to college. You're young, what you may go into college may not be what you really wanted...it's one of those things where we kinda force people to go "hey pick one" when sometimes you need some time to think about what you really want to do. Sometimes you know earlier, but a lot of times you need to dive into a few courses to see what you really want. It might suck that way, but if you were really passionate about something - this is less of an issue because you'd already seek out what you need to do. But sometimes you may want to do more than one thing and aren't sure which is holding your passion the most.

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    Sure, I get what you're saying Arshes, and I agree. But generally this idea of a "backup plan" only applies when people are interested in pursuing a creative career, usually art. So I just ask what would be the backup plan for any other profession?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Azuerous View Post
    But as far as they are concerned its better to be unhappy and cry in a Lambo
    Personally it doesn't matter If I dont get rich from doing art but I do want to live comfortably and I believe strongly that once you do something that you love with all your soul and vigour you will be successful and "happy"
    That's a little romantic. Love of anything isn't going to get you a job. Competence and skill will. (and not being a jerk.) The hope is that loving what you do will push you to constantly improve, but there's no guarantee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Sure, I get what you're saying Arshes, and I agree. But generally this idea of a "backup plan" only applies when people are interested in pursuing a creative career, usually art. So I just ask what would be the backup plan for any other profession?
    When I was originally thinking of going into Computer Science, my Dad wanted me to take accounting classes as a 'back-up' plan. (It would have been fairly easy from there to get a book-keeping certificate, since I'd already had a lot of math.) Does that count?

    Edit: I never got that talk when I went into art, finally - but that may have been because by that time I had actual work experience in a particular area of the finance industry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Sure, I get what you're saying Arshes, and I agree. But generally this idea of a "backup plan" only applies when people are interested in pursuing a creative career, usually art. So I just ask what would be the backup plan for any other profession?
    Art.

    Of course.

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    @ Dusty


    I dont shun that way of life and I do work but not enough to afford all the nice things and I know this because I was kicked out at almost 17.
    Luckily I am an excellent cook and was able to find a good job at a reputable restaurant back when I was 16.
    Worked as a delivery boy carrying food all over the place and one day the chef got badly burned by hot oil and that's when I tried to cook in place of the chef then the manager saw that I was good at it and offered me a position in the kitchen.
    Living on my own taught me many things and the little stuff is what you really notice.
    Reason I got kicked out?
    My friends father shop got broken into and I was accused of stealing the key
    and my parents believed the guy and since I was such an embarrassment so I got the "where did we go wrong argument" and eventually the boot.
    Eventually they caught the thief , he admitted to the crime and his confession did not include "a boy and a key".
    My parents came to where I was staying at that time and gave me a tearful apology.
    Truthfully I had no grudges , so I moved back in with them and the idea of having living cost cut means that I could save more money.

    It was more than a year Living on my own and I could have paid for college but that would have been financially draining but not impossible.

    As for a backup plan I think you could say being an exceptional cook with no
    formal training a good safety net.
    It comes natural to me and at that same restaurant I am one of the best in there and I did go to food festivals , competitions and still hold my ground against accomplished career chefs.

    Cooking and art are two things I can see myself working my ass off for.
    Mechanical engineering maybe not but It is a Career that holds my interest.



    @ Kafka Dreams

    None taken ^_^
    But either I didnt express my thoughts well or you misunderstood what I typed.
    I was talking about getting a job doing something
    like flipping burgers, working on the docks etc
    Something So I can cover the cost of rent and food with my aunt.
    Then in my free time practice art.
    Although could rely on her to cover everything and stay in a room and draw 6+ hours but that wouldn't be healthy or nice to her.

    Comfortable life means enough space , never wet , cold or hungry.
    I dont need to buy a porche only to drive it 10 mph in traffic.
    I always had art in my mind and this is not the first time I have tried drawing.
    From 9 th grade I have tried and gave up numerous times.
    Its just that now I want to be serious about what I want to do.

    Easy?
    I dont ask for easy and before I learned to cook really good there were
    burns, cuts , blood , sweat and even tears.
    Talent isnt nothing unless you refine it and even if you have no talent
    that cant prevent me you or anyone from doing anything that makes us happy in life.
    I am trying to be realistic and I know there is competition and I am willing to clawed and get beaten down for it.

    No offense, but you seem to be a little naive about how easy it will be to become a professional artist. With five weeks experience under your belt what makes you think you are qualified to find a job? You say that you don't want to be rich but want a comfortable life. Well the term 'starving artist' exists for a reason.

    as for people telling you cant do something , well I came 5th out of 12 people in a cross country after a near death experience with asthma a few months back and had a sever attack after the race.

    @ JFierce

    I am willing to fully dedicate myself to it and even live on the fringes of survival.
    And when I said its something I can see myself sitting down 40+ hours a week doing this.
    I mean it is a passion that I can see myself doing the rest of my life.
    Not all careers are "got to school learn this=job"
    Programming is a good example of this and another is Web Design and
    I know there are more but those are the only two I have seen first hand.
    as for starting out just 5 weeks ago read the above answers.

    Art takes years of intense practice I agree but doesnt that cover most people who are the best at what they do?
    I do agree with school being a supplement and I did attend one for a short period but it just was not my cup of tea.

    @ JDSart I agree with the points you made but why did you leave mechanical engineering?


    @ JeffX99

    From my extreme forum searching I have found that your advice is always solid but man you got to write a book or something.

    @ Alice Herring

    I guess that's from my English literature days Lol

    You can have skill and competence in you do but does it make you happy.
    and If you dont love what you do why do it?
    Life is short do what you love and love what you is a lesson I learned from my brother.
    He loved track and field and was really good at it even had the option to get sponsored overseas but guess what he did architecture instead and although he dislikes it he continues to do it because that is putting food on the table.

    ~ Hard work beats wasted talent.

    Doing a little soul searching ^^
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  33. #22
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    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Sure, I get what you're saying Arshes, and I agree. But generally this idea of a "backup plan" only applies when people are interested in pursuing a creative career, usually art. So I just ask what would be the backup plan for any other profession?
    Well art was one of my backup careers, because certain medical professions were a bit too competitive for my liking and given the stress of dealing with the possibility of fucking up another human (because of stress)...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    I don't think it's necessarily odd. I had several careers I had thought about before I went to college. You're young, what you may go into college may not be what you really wanted...it's one of those things where we kinda force people to go "hey pick one" when sometimes you need some time to think about what you really want to do. Sometimes you know earlier, but a lot of times you need to dive into a few courses to see what you really want. It might suck that way, but if you were really passionate about something - this is less of an issue because you'd already seek out what you need to do. But sometimes you may want to do more than one thing and aren't sure which is holding your passion the most.
    I think thats clearly what I am going through.
    Too many things are holding my passion right now.

    ~ Hard work beats wasted talent.

    Doing a little soul searching ^^
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Sure, I get what you're saying Arshes, and I agree. But generally this idea of a "backup plan" only applies when people are interested in pursuing a creative career, usually art. So I just ask what would be the backup plan for any other profession?
    Actually Art was my back-up plan in case I couldn't afford to continue school to be a Special Education Teacher. It's working out a little. O_O

    To the OP, 5 weeks is not nearly enough time to know for sure whether or not you love art enough to to all the amazingly hard work it takes to get into the field. Art is frustratingly difficult, so much so that a lot of us have had that moment of complete aggravation where we just want to quit. Of course we don't because we're passionate and dedicated (or stupid), but some people do quit. So you really need to take some time and study independently before you make great investments in pursuing art as a career. Make art a hobby before you make it a job.

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    dpaint is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    As someone who started working at fifteen and left home at 17, I didn't go to college and get a degree. I say do whatever you want as long as you pay for your choices. What would you do if your mommy wasn't paying your bills for you?

    I didn't know what I wanted to do right away I thought maybe be an artist or a musician but it took me twelve years after high school to make a decision and at thirty I quit my job and worked to become an artist. I had to go back to work a couple of times but in five years I made it happen.

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    ^ dpaint pretty much said what others have forgotten.
    Although I should have remembered as these threads pop up a lot.

    If it's on your parents dime, then ya know try to convince them but you can't complain if they aren't convinced. Most people don't have parents that are able or willing to help with college, especially for an art career, or one that's known to be less stable.

    If you truly do want to be an artist and they say no you'll have to make the choice as many have on these forums. Say fuck it and do it. If you can handle the hard lifestyle all the while improving your drawing skills as much as you can, you'll probably succeed in time. But it's not going to be easy. I've read people on here that have kids, jobs, are going to school, night classes and they still take the time to draw and practice. If you haven't read the words of Wisdom from Jason Manley Sticky yet I'd read it.




    Personally I'd take some foundational college courses that apply across the board then take a few simple classes like drawing, painting etc. Then while your taking these courses apply all your effort into them along with your courses. See how much you improve. Then you can get a better gauge if you can handle it or not.

    Because frankly if your just beginning your likely not going to be ready for a professional art career once you graduate. Most people I've seen that went into art in college as a beginner came out ok, some pretty good. But most required a lot more work compared to others working in the field and you don't want to have spent your parents money then find yourself in a situation where your at home trying to explain you have to get better at your art before you can find work.

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    If you are that passionate about art, I am pretty sure that if anything it would also survive you going to school for let's say... 2 years?

    At least where I live we have several 2-year-stuff. I had one of them where on the 3rd semester we did 3D and a game prototype as our 3rd sem project.

    I do admire your courage and determination. Mine got beaten down by comments like that, so even though I recommend an education in a related field, I sure as hell also want you to keep racing for your goal regardless!

    You can do both, you know

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    I took architecture but somewhere in the middle of the course I started drawing like crazy and posting on art communities (discovering CA.org had it's part in that change). Eventually I decided to go one hundred percent for art career while sacrificing some of the architecture studying which ended up with lot of frustration by the end as I barely passed tests and even repeated one year. However I managed to reach decent level in my art and graduate architecture at the same time. I proved to my family that I really want to paint and illustrate, that I can get really good at this and I take it seriously.

    Straight after graduating I got a job as graphic artist and illustrator at small game studio. It's not always super exciting but I couldn't do anything else.

    Last edited by Farvus; March 14th, 2012 at 04:02 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azuerous View Post
    Cooking and art are two things I can see myself working my ass off for.
    Mechanical engineering maybe not but It is a Career that holds my interest
    Yeah, I'd stick to that.
    The issue is that you only started 5 weeks ago.

    Why don't you apply to art schools (for scholarships) as well as engineering, and then wait what time holds for you. I personally think there is a big step between saying "I can be a starving artist" and then actually living it.

    People can have more than one passion, you know. I will pursue art and hopefully one day afford art school, but I also LOVE working in political science research, it is intellectually stimulating in a completely different way than art is.

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    One option if you want to go the college route but you're really undecided about careers is to have a double major in two subjects, or a major in one subject and a minor in a different subject. For instance, I knew someone who majored in finance and minored in classical guitar. Some of my classmates had double-majors in art and other things, too. It depends on the school, of course, but it's one possibility to consider.

    So, maybe major in cooking or mechanical engineering, minor in art? Or skip college, and pursue a career in cooking to support a possible future career in art? (Because it's probably going to be a while before you can support yourself on art. Also you may discover that doing art as your job isn't quite what you thought it would be like and you might change your mind... This has been known to happen.)

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