Trouble With Shading - It's Impossible! - Page 2
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  1. #31
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Quote Originally Posted by twilightmoon777 View Post
    @ JeffX99

    Thanks! A part of me realizes that I just need to keep at it and experiment. Though it does get frustrating sometimes to work and work but feel like your not getting no where. I know I've got to push these bad drawings out of me to get to the good ones and I'm glad to know I'm at least on the right track. Guess the only thing really holding me back now is time. Could you recommend some good pencils for me? I know I should experiment with a variety but which ones would you recommend? Ones that are sort of in the middle range of expensive and cheap. Right now I use Artist's Loft pencils and I'm not very happy with them. I can't wait to use them up and get new pencils. LOL
    One further point in response to the bold...try not to think of it just as "push the bad ones out to get to the good". I know that is sort of a popular simplification but IMO can lead to the misconception that "just doing it" or "pencil miles" or burning through sketchbooks will lead to better work.

    The only thing that truly leads to better work, more awareness and overall development is conscious, dedicated effort...thinking about what you're doing, how you're doing it, what you're doing it with and what you want to get out of it. Every drawing should be an effort to observe and develop instead of just being a hashmark on the wall....every line or mark you make should be considered.

    Hope that helps a bit. Keep it up!

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  3. #32
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    zephyri is offline professional guacamole maker Level 5 Gladiator: Myrmillo
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    Don't know if you've seen this guy's work: Sam Wolfe Connelly

    But that post answers a few questions on how he does his work, and his shading is some of the most amazing I've seen. The bit I found interesting was that he layers alot (which will mean lots of light pressure work) but also goes back over areas that need smoothing out, to fill in imperfections the paper causes.

    Experimenting with papers and materials is really important. I'm super picky about the surfaces I paint and draw on because I really love smooth shading and it's only through trial and error that I've found the kind of materials I work with now. And I'll say that I have a certain cheaper brand of sketchbook for studies and stuff I'm not taking overly seriously, and a more expensive brand for when I want to do really quality, personal work. The mental divide works for me, but each to their own.

    Think about what you're trying to do with your work. Are you after a really really smooth transition from light to dark, or something that's got more of a noticable hand made mark to it? For example, if you want your work to have a rougher, less controlled feel, then a rougher toothed paper, or a softer pencil lead will give you different results (and using soft pencil on smooth paper will give one result, hard pencil on rough paper another ).

    If you're after smooth, it might be useful to just try shading simple 2d boxes with the same shade, so they're as even as they can be, without lifting your pencil off the page... so you're forcing yourself to think about how much pressure you're putting down. Once you get that you could do simple gradients and the like (so you're more focused on the act and contorl of shading rather than making whatever you're drawing look right as well).

    My 2cents, apply with salt if you like

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  5. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie D View Post
    A Project from the John Howe book linked in above post


    Get the book Twilightmoon. It should help you with your modeling of form.
    I'm sorry Charlie, that is the about worst shading tutorial I've ever seen in my life. That is a terrible example. Do not separate rendering with value, at least not while you're starting out.

    Getting good and clear values according the forms should be the first priority of a beginning student in rendering. How you make your marks is very much a secondary, if not, tertiary concern.

    The John Howe example has no hierarchy of values, and the skull is a bit small compared to the face(another bad approach, drawing the face instead of drawing the whole head). It's a bit curious though, as John Howe is quite a great artist.

    Last edited by Aaron_; March 15th, 2012 at 06:41 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by continue View Post
    I'm sorry Charlie, that is the about worst shading tutorial I've ever seen in my life. That is a terrible example. Do not separate rendering with value, at least not while you're starting out.

    Getting good and clear values according the forms should be the first priority of a beginning student in rendering. How you make your marks is very much a secondary, if not, tertiary concern.

    The John Howe example has no hierarchy of values, and the skull is a bit small compared to the face(another bad approach, drawing the face instead of drawing the whole head). It's a bit curious though, as John Howe is quite a great artist.



    The ten projects are designed as a course that will advance your ability and skills as you work through them.
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    Hope this helps.

    Last edited by Charlie D; March 15th, 2012 at 09:48 PM.
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    Sharp pencil and Patience

    shading is an observation exercise..use a sharp pencil that is midway

    between dark and light.. HB gives you best of both without turning smudged.

    HB Staedtler or HB Faber..or mechanical pencil HB i use Pentel .05

    i must emphasise a Sharp pencil.. draw clear edges or it will loose definition

    and turn woolly i have a inexpensive wooden lay figure which i painted white

    it gives excellent cast shadow and reflection...in the old days... at art

    college we spent a day a week drawing classical casts.. which are full-size

    plaster figures from antiquity ... drawing these gives you discipline and

    observational skills as well as something that seems lost today..Patience..

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  8. #36
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    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordLouis View Post
    I don't understand this video, or at least the title.
    Don't worry, I'm sure Charlie D doesn't either.


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    Thank you for that useful post Elwell

    Learning to see

    "...the ideas are what matter most" Doug Chiang
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