Studying alone
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    Studying alone

    Hi

    So, first I'd like to say that I'm an amateur rather than someone who studies art in artistic school.
    I'm 19 years old and I've just started more involved experience with art.
    My first "little step" was when at 7 I found book "Heads and portraits" written by J.M. Parramonn, I loved that book, I had spent many hours trying to "copy" pictures from that book, but I didn't have someone who could tell me more important informations about bases. So, discouraged I gave up it around age of 12.

    I think I had to mature to understand what is really important in art.

    Now as a more mature person, I want to start my experience again.
    At this moment I've read only a few books about this topic, but these most
    intersting:
    -Loomis Books;
    -Classical drawing atelier;
    -Charles Bargue Drawing Course.

    For these moment I have a concept of "feeling the form", I know what it is, but still have the problems with achieving it, maybe some of you know the best exercises to train it?

    BTW: I don't want to go artistic school, because I think there is a chance that I would do things I don't want, I would like to study medicine next year, so I will have a much lessons to study a human anatomy.

    And so pictures of my the most favourite drawings of artists I want to study:

    I love the beauty of soft line of these studies

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    TinyBird is offline Why you gotta be an angry burd Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    How about you post your art too?

    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
    Comic!
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    Go for it. Start a sketchbook here, comment on others to learn together and grow. Never too late.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Not something I'd usually say but that boy has a really small penis! It reminds me of a baby-worm peeking out of an apple.

    *points and laughs*

    Last edited by MidgardSerpent; March 7th, 2012 at 04:43 PM.
    My Self-Portraits

    "Work for your self first. You can paint best the things you like or the things you hate. You cannot paint well when indifferent.
    Express a mental opinion about something you are sensitive to in life around you. There is a profound difference between sensitivity and sentimentality."

    ~ John Sloan Gist of Art
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidgardSerpent View Post
    Not something I'd usually say but that boy has a really small penis! It reminds me of a baby-worm peeking out of an apple.

    *points and laughs*

    That's being non circumcised - you know the natural state where a willy will contract to safety. Just because some countries still do it, doesn't mean it's any smaller when aroused.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    That's being non circumcised - you know the natural state where a willy will contract to safety.
    You really think I wouldn't know that?

    But even for a non-circumcised boy it seems disproportionally small to me, but I guess he's more of a grower than a shower.





    To get a bit more on-topic, I think that second pic actually loses a bit of spatial form because it looks so washed out tonally, so it's kind of funny the TS put that particular pic up as something he'd aspire to.

    Anyway, if you have problem 'feeling form' you have to get a firmer grip on construction, Loomis is a good start, other books people usually recommend are Bridgman and Michael Hampton. I actually think Hogarth is useful for construction too, although a lot of people aren't too fond of his exaggerations.


    A few pointers off the top of my head;

    - Try to think in terms of big masses, form concepts, simplify if you have to, don't let yourself be distracted by little details. Those forms have to have authority and clarity to really work as solid forms.

    Try to become aware of those spatial planes on that form, how each plane is at a slightly different angle from the light and how that affects it's tone.


    - Medical anatomy isn't quite the same as artistic anatomy. You basically learn anatomy to inform you about those forms and how they interact, not to show off how many muscles you can name. There are tons of smaller muscles that don't affect the look of the surface too much so there's not much of a point learning those for the artist.

    - Lots of lifedrawing, there's no substitute for the real life 3d experience.

    - For heads there are these Asaro heads, they basically sculptures with simplified planes, really helpful to do a few copies of those, even doing those photo's can help you out if you can't get your hands on a real one.

    Last edited by MidgardSerpent; March 7th, 2012 at 06:57 PM.
    My Self-Portraits

    "Work for your self first. You can paint best the things you like or the things you hate. You cannot paint well when indifferent.
    Express a mental opinion about something you are sensitive to in life around you. There is a profound difference between sensitivity and sentimentality."

    ~ John Sloan Gist of Art
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    The best way to learn to understand form is drawing from life, either from plaster casts or models.
    Along with anatomy and perspective it's important to study form, structure, planes, lighting, values, edges etc.

    In addition to the books you already have I can suggest the following resources. They share a similar Academic method.

    Anthony Ryder, The Artist's Complete Guide to Figure Drawing
    Scott Waddell, Painting Demonstrations and Webisodes
    Douglas Flynt, Blog posts with helpful information
    Juliette Aristides, Lessons in Classical Drawing

    This Russian book is also interesting:
    V.A. Mogilevtsev, Fundamentals of Drawing

    And one can't go wrong with classic sources like Harold Speed or John H. Vanderpoel.

    Last edited by nickydraws; November 21st, 2012 at 09:51 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MidgardSerpent View Post
    Not something I'd usually say but that boy has a really small penis! It reminds me of a baby-worm peeking out of an apple.

    *points and laughs*


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    I am teaching myself and this forum so much info that you
    can find what you want or sometimes find info that is close to what you want and then you
    figure out the rest.

    read this thread http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...53#post3163053

    start with simple form get some white or off white spray paint, jumbo blocks , a cheap desk lamp and a night stand you can pick up cheap at a garage sale.

    Spray paint the objects white or a strong color that shows shadows well then analyse not copy them.

    Supplement the exercises with

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=76955

    Norling perspective made easy

    Loomis successful drawing
    Loomis creative illustration (page 80 but read the whole thing if you can)

    Thats pretty much the basics after than you should be able to move on to a book like Hampton Design and invention or Vilppu spherical forms that breaks the figure down into simple shapes.

    Last edited by Azuerous; March 8th, 2012 at 12:23 AM.
    ~ Hard work beats wasted talent.

    Doing a little soul searching ^^
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    If the kind of art you'd want to do is like what you've posted then I'd go the "classical atelier" route. You don't need to join an actual atelier, if you have good enough study habits and have the space to set one up yourself. Eventually, you'll definitely want to start going to figure drawing sessions though. Check if there's a local models guild near where you live and then find out where they model.

    Here is a good book to get if you're into classical drawing: http://www.amazon.com/Classical-Draw.../dp/0823006573

    And this: http://www.amazon.com/Drawing-Lesson...1187012&sr=1-2

    And check out these threads: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=64711

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=170281

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=50150

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=53517

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    Thumbs up

    May I know the name of the artist who drew that lady in the original post (the first picture)?

    Tks! :-)
    Xeon

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    George Howard Hilder?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jacob Kobryn View Post
    If you had not recommended my thread on my "Classical Atelier at Home" I would do it now

    I also have a website where one finds more information on how to do a Bargue drawing and a cast drawing if one is interested in studying home alone

    www.cast-drawing.com (also see my signature)

    www.ClassicalAtelier@HOME.com
    My website for learning traditional fine art on your own! --- Derived from THIS thread at CA.org
    ------------ ♦ ♦ ♦ ------------
    www.cast-drawing.com
    drawing casts (geometric shapes, anatomical casts, skull), tutorials on Bargue drawing and cast drawing, Willow Charcoal, free drawing exercises
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