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  1. #1
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    Unhappy Getting an idea from mind to paper

    My biggest problem in drawing concepts is getting an idea from my mind to paper in a satisfying way. i think my observational skills are fine, but I've got trouble when it comes to draw concepts, specifically when drawing without references. Is there more to it then just drawing over and over?

    Any ideas or comments would be greatly appreciated!


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  3. #2
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    FIRST POST DING DIGN DING!!!!

    nah just kidding man, welcome alex. How are ya mate good to see ya one here

    Umm ive laready sorta told you that in person, but at the cost of sounding incredibly cliche... Draw from life. Im sorta hypocrit (i dont do it enough) but it does help. Go start a daily sketchbook and keep drawing, try and post stuff as frequently as possible.


    3rd post acctually 0_o
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    Quote Originally Posted by dogfood
    Sarcasm sometimes grips me like an octopus helmet.

  4. #3
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    Try drawing three dimensional shapes around things you draw from life. Being able to create and twist things in space is the key to drawing well from imagination. But drawing from life is the best way to create a surplus of things to work with and to develop muscle memory.
    Drawing everyday since 10/04

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    Thanks for the tips! :thumbsup: SylkX, do you mean basic geometric shapes such as cones, cubes and so on?

    Did you know that a common test for dislexia (learning disorder) is to ask the test subject to describe an object in their mind? WHen i got tested they asked me to imagine a slice of cake in my mind. Mine was a big slice with lots of fancy toppings on a nice plate with a fork and it was turning around so i could see it from all angles. and apparently I'm slightly dislexic... supposively a normal person would simply think of it being just a slice of cake and nothing more to it.

    putting aside the fact that it is a very dubious experiment, since for example prompting a test person with whether the cake turns in their mind's eye might make them think they should be imagining a turning cake, i think it's really a right/left brain thing.

    I think I'll try starting off with simple things. I'll be posting them in my scetch book.

    cheers :chug:

  6. #5
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    learning perspective is key to creating things without reference, IMHO.

    -Rob
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    Encouragement keeps me swimming , even in the undertow of disappointment.

  7. #6
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    For me, personally, I like to write myself a discription and articulate all of my ideas that way first. You have to ask yourself some basic questions before hand though. First, what does the design have to acomplolish (i.e. what does the story require of it) ? Secondly, how does it acompolish this? I can usually fill up at least two or three pages of with textual brainstorming before I start sketching. This works for me but I don't know others would find it usefull. Basically though, I think anyone here would agree on good ol'fashion brain-storming. Fill up a couple pages in your sketchbook doodling individual design attributes. Expiriment, eleminate, refine, assemble and package.

  8. #7
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    Yes, shapes like cones, cubes and cylinders are the basic building blocks. A strong knowledge of perspective is also crucial because it gives you a set of rules on how shapes look in any position. I still have yet to master either but my drawings have improved considerably since I've started to block in my figures.
    Drawing everyday since 10/04

  9. #8
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    Exo - thats a pretty good idea maybe i should start doing so too. in my compositions i have problems getting elements the way i want to. maybe i should consider spending lots of times on doodles and brainstorming before... Thanks for that man.

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