Do you work on multiple artworks at the same time?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Do you work on multiple artworks at the same time?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    957
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 72 Times in 50 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Do you work on multiple artworks at the same time?

    At the moment, I'm currently working on about 100 at the same time. Through me contacting models on Modelmayhem and models there contacting me, I have about 100 images from which I am producing drawings. It was taking too long to work on them to completion individually (if I spend 10 or more hours on just one drawing at one time, the other models ask about their drawings), so instead I work on a little bit of each drawing at the same time (which enables me to give them a fair timetable as to their completion). This way, I can have several drawings finished in 3 weeks for example, rather than 1 drawing finished in 2 weeks.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    brooklyn
    Posts
    1,534
    Thanks
    82
    Thanked 198 Times in 118 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    that seems a little insane/large in scale, maybe write yourself a schedule and tell them when the drawings are scheduled to be completed if they ask. personally I usually am working on one work project and have one or two personal things on the back burner in down time.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Existent
    Posts
    326
    Thanks
    92
    Thanked 12 Times in 10 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I used to work on only one big painting at a time. I've found that working on multiple paintings help me work better, faster, and with more energy.

    If I get bored of a piece, I can just switch over to a new piece and keep my interest and energy up. I'm working on 3 pieces right now, though I've worked on as many as 8.

    I'm also using acrylic now instead of oil which helps speed up the process with faster drying times etc.

    I'd say it's a balance. Got to find a good balance

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    3,845
    Thanks
    2,294
    Thanked 2,230 Times in 1,350 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yes, that's normal. A whole hundred is a bit much, for me, but I usually have several illustrations in the works at any one time, and a few personal projects on back burner.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,547
    Thanks
    102
    Thanked 1,476 Times in 731 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    When I was working in oil, several. Watercolor, usually just the one. Digital...eh. My hard drive is littered with unfinished junk.

    A hundred is a bunch, though.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,081
    Thanks
    323
    Thanked 968 Times in 519 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It's not unusual to work on several things at once. I usually have 2-6 different projects in progress at a time, and that's just considering paid work. If I figure in personal projects too, that's probably another 2-6.

    Working on as many as you suggest though to me suggests you aren't focusing, and are more happy either starting projects, or talking to models. This doesn't sound like a good working practice. I don't know what the "right" number of running projects is for you, but I seriously doubt it's 100 if art is your true motivation.

    In photography they call a guy who mainly wants to shoot photos to spend time with women (or get them naked) a "guy with a camera" (as opposed to a photographer). Don't be a "guy with a pencil"...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to J Wilson For This Useful Post:


  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,081
    Thanks
    323
    Thanked 968 Times in 519 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I usually tell my models that I may end up NEVER using any of their photos for art, or it may end up being many months later. It's just hard to tell in advance if the model will suit my needs, have convincing poses/expressions, or if a project will need to be put on the back burner or outright canceled. Instead, I share photos from the shoot so they have something to show off or keep for themselves, and if it does develop into art it's a nice surprise for them later on.

    Even if the shots don't immediately fill a project, sometimes I need a hand, or a face, or something for a project with no time to shoot new reference, so it's nice to have a lot of unused shots in reserve.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I currently have 7 paintings in various states of completion, I think considering drying times etc that's a reasonable number. 100 would seem a little excessive.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I don't think there's ever been a time when I'm not doing multiple things... There's usually between 1 - 4 paying jobs going simultaneously, and I don't know how many personal projects... (Personal work varies from ongoing-neverending projects that I dip into frequently, random spur-of-the-moment stuff, maybe a dozen short-term projects for the immediate future, and a vast pile of stuff that I dig up and screw around with whenever I get time...)

    I think it's pretty common to do lots of stuff at once. In the long run you'll most likely gravitate towards whatever approach works best for you, regardless...

    100 sounds like a lot, but I guess it depends what they are. I've been known to be working on 50 - 100 comic pages more or less at the same time or in a short enough time period where it amounts to the same thing as "simultaneously", or filling 100 sketchbook pages in one live session, so I guess why not? (100 paintings might be a bit much to juggle though...)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #10
    TinyBird's Avatar
    TinyBird is offline Why you gotta be an angry burd Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    HELLsinki, Finland
    Posts
    4,753
    Thanks
    338
    Thanked 2,654 Times in 1,618 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by FlameDragon View Post
    if I spend 10 or more hours on just one drawing at one time, the other models ask about their drawings), so instead I work on a little bit of each drawing at the same time (which enables me to give them a fair timetable as to their completion).
    Huh, that sounds more like your models are your employers/commissioners rather than models. I don't know how Modelmayhem works (I mean usually I'd think that models work for you, not the other way around [aside commissioned portraits]), but I hope you're not spreading yourself thin with 100 images only because you want to please your models (working with oil and having to wait for a long time for the paint to dry is a good reason, trying to please several models by forcibly having something to show isn't, especially if it hinders your ability to finish the images).

    As for the actual question, I try to finish most of my images in one sitting, but I always have at least couple comic projects/pages in the making, and usually couple other images too, so maybe five at best. After that I start to forget things.

    Last edited by TinyBird; February 22nd, 2012 at 01:36 PM.
    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
    Comic!
    Sketchbook (Critiques, no compliments please.)
    Tumblr
    Website
    Livejournal
    DeviantArt
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    957
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 72 Times in 50 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TinyBird View Post
    Huh, that sounds more like your models are your employers/commissioners rather than models. I don't know how Modelmayhem works (I mean usually I'd think that models work for you, not the other way around [aside commissioned portraits]), but I hope you're not spreading yourself thin with 100 images only because you want to please your models (working with oil and having to wait for a long time for the paint to dry is a good reason, trying to please several models by forcibly having something to show isn't, especially if it hinders your ability to finish the images).

    As for the actual question, I try to finish most of my images in one sitting, but I always have at least couple comic projects/pages in the making, and usually couple other images too, so maybe five at best. After that I start to forget things.
    Ideally, I want to produce drawings that are sufficiently representative of my current artistic abilities. Such a drawing takes about 10 hours, which usually equates to 2 weeks since I work full-time and also take an art class after work. Some models start asking me about the drawing after 3 or 4 days, then ask about it again a few days later. It seems that several of them would rather have me rush through it though than them having to wait longer while I take my time. Since I'm the one "hiring" them, I try to spend the amount of time I think is necessary for it to look good anyway, even if it means an extra week or 2. I know both of us would be more satisfied. I only "rush" if they constantly ask me, as it can get annoying.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    957
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 72 Times in 50 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    It's not unusual to work on several things at once. I usually have 2-6 different projects in progress at a time, and that's just considering paid work. If I figure in personal projects too, that's probably another 2-6.

    Working on as many as you suggest though to me suggests you aren't focusing, and are more happy either starting projects, or talking to models. This doesn't sound like a good working practice. I don't know what the "right" number of running projects is for you, but I seriously doubt it's 100 if art is your true motivation.

    In photography they call a guy who mainly wants to shoot photos to spend time with women (or get them naked) a "guy with a camera" (as opposed to a photographer). Don't be a "guy with a pencil"...

    Yeah, I wouldn't want to have such a label. I guess I am inspired by alot of people and seize the opportunity when I can. On the website especially, it seems that many models are only active for a short time. If you don't take the opportunity to draw them at that moment, then you might not get the chance again. For example, a model and I agreed to do a drawing session but I ended up being sick when the day came around. When I was better and tried rescheduling, she said she was no longer modeling.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #13
    TinyBird's Avatar
    TinyBird is offline Why you gotta be an angry burd Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    HELLsinki, Finland
    Posts
    4,753
    Thanks
    338
    Thanked 2,654 Times in 1,618 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by FlameDragon View Post
    Some models start asking me about the drawing after 3 or 4 days, then ask about it again a few days later.
    Yeah but is that actually required on the site or something? Why do you have to answer to your model about when you are going to finish your pic and show process on it?

    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
    Comic!
    Sketchbook (Critiques, no compliments please.)
    Tumblr
    Website
    Livejournal
    DeviantArt
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,142
    Thanks
    778
    Thanked 489 Times in 311 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I don't have a lot of multiple projects. If I do, there's a reason... paint drying or other technical conditions, classwork. On occasion I have to step back from a piece for a bit longer then overnight, but so far, luckily that hasn't happened often. As my work gets more developed or skilled, this may happen often.
    I do, however have sketchbooks and notebooks full of ideas. I just don't like to start on them if I can't finish them in a reasonable amount of time.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,081
    Thanks
    323
    Thanked 968 Times in 519 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by FlameDragon View Post
    Yeah, I wouldn't want to have such a label. I guess I am inspired by alot of people and seize the opportunity when I can. On the website especially, it seems that many models are only active for a short time. If you don't take the opportunity to draw them at that moment, then you might not get the chance again. For example, a model and I agreed to do a drawing session but I ended up being sick when the day came around. When I was better and tried rescheduling, she said she was no longer modeling.
    Spend less time browsing Model Mayhem and you'll have less temptation to schedule more models when you already have plenty to work on.

    If you are hiring them for drawing sessions, rather than photography, it wouldn't be a stretch to assume you have a drawing or 10 to show from the actual drawing session.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    New Haven, CT
    Posts
    2,081
    Thanks
    323
    Thanked 968 Times in 519 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    As a self plug that I think applies here, I have a blog called DIY Art School, and one of the first posts I talk about the idea that you tend to get more progress out of a bunch of faster studies, than a small handful of more thoroughly rendered pieces early on. Looking at your sketchbook, my feeling is you'd be making faster progress if you did exactly that. Instead of spending 10 hours per drawing over the course of two weeks, you can get 3-4 drawings in an hour if you do 15-20 minute studies. Once you get better, you can get a fairly finished look in 20 minutes, and drawing more poses gains you more experience.


    Take a look at my blog for a little more detail about my reasoning for suggesting this.
    http://diyartschool.blogspot.com/
    The articles titled Classes Part 2 (and part 3) is where I touch on that topic.


    ..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to J Wilson For This Useful Post:


  19. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    957
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 72 Times in 50 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by TinyBird View Post
    Yeah but is that actually required on the site or something? Why do you have to answer to your model about when you are going to finish your pic and show process on it?
    The site doesn't force us to do so, it just seems polite to respond when a model inquires about a drawing. Also, they can easily give you a negative recommendation and deter others from working with you.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    957
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 72 Times in 50 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    Spend less time browsing Model Mayhem and you'll have less temptation to schedule more models when you already have plenty to work on.

    If you are hiring them for drawing sessions, rather than photography, it wouldn't be a stretch to assume you have a drawing or 10 to show from the actual drawing session.
    Many times I do both. I would draw a variety of poses, and then at the end photograph poses that would be difficult for the model to hold for long. Some models are in other states or countries so they just email a photo.

    Last edited by FlameDragon; February 23rd, 2012 at 11:19 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Brooklyn, NY
    Posts
    957
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 72 Times in 50 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    As a self plug that I think applies here, I have a blog called DIY Art School, and one of the first posts I talk about the idea that you tend to get more progress out of a bunch of faster studies, than a small handful of more thoroughly rendered pieces early on. Looking at your sketchbook, my feeling is you'd be making faster progress if you did exactly that. Instead of spending 10 hours per drawing over the course of two weeks, you can get 3-4 drawings in an hour if you do 15-20 minute studies. Once you get better, you can get a fairly finished look in 20 minutes, and drawing more poses gains you more experience.


    Take a look at my blog for a little more detail about my reasoning for suggesting this.
    http://diyartschool.blogspot.com/
    The articles titled Classes Part 2 (and part 3) is where I touch on that topic.


    ..
    Thanks for the advice, I'll check out your blog. I do feel like I have progressed, but not as fast as I would've wanted. I had been spending that much time on the drawings since the models were expecting it to be the same quality as the other drawings in my portfolio. Doing quicker studies definitely has alot of merit, as I do want to be able to produce quality drawings in a shorter amount of time.

    I recall my portrait drawing class with Camie Davis. It was the last day of a 2 month class (8 Saturdays) and she decided to draw the model too on the last day (she was instructing all the previous times). She produced a better drawing in about 30 minutes than my drawing that I had worked on for 32 hours!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •