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    Icon Looking for life advice from the older and wiser of CA

    I have a question that has been bugging me. I want more experienced artists opinions on this.

    I've been mulling over an issue as a young artist. My friend and I have been batting around this question, and coming up with opposite answers. I'm curious to hear your thoughts on it.

    Is it possible to be an artist and work in other things than just art?

    What I mean is, I have polymath tendencies and I worried its going to ruin me. I enjoy learning and exploring lots of different subjects. I like trying new techniques, new mediums, and new materials. I'm an artist, but also a writer, and filmmaker. I also like working out, mountain climbing, traveling around, going to music shows, and having interesting life experiences and going on adventures. Theres lots of different subects outside of art that I'm interested in though to me all of these things relate to my art.

    I've also heard a lot of advice that you have to specialize in order to make it as an artist. That you have to devote yourself to just art, and nothing else. My friend insists that if you want to make it as an artist, you can't be a polymath. You have to restrict yourself to just art, and not just art but a specific section of art. If you want to do illustration you can't do anything else. You have to spend all your free time drawing and nothing else, or else you're doomed to failure. You have to hone your skills to a razor sharp edge at the expense of putting time into other things.

    I want to do more than just that. It's not that I lack work ethic, it's that I'm interested in building up my skills in multiple areas. I hope that these other things give me a broader view, help me see more things, and hopefully make my art stronger. Neil Gaiman and Chuck Palahniuk both gave some advice to young writers that basically boiled down to "To be a good writer you have to write a lot, and live a lot of life. Get lots of life experiences and write a lot". This is my approach towards art also.

    However, I'm not so sure about that. There is some part of me that fears in the back of my head, that trying to go for so many things means I will fail at all of them.

    What are your thoughts? Is specialization the only way?

    Last edited by TheDonQuixotic; February 21st, 2012 at 09:06 AM.
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    It's a jack of all trades, master of none scenario. You can be successful in multiple things yes, but you probably wont be exceptional. You get out what you put in, and there are going to be people who put their all into art and nothing else and be better than you. Then there will be people who put their all into art and nothing else and be worse than you. There are going to be people who don't put their all into art and still be better than you, and visa versa, etc, etc...

    The best thing is to not look life as a bar graph of skills, and just do what you love, whether that be one thing for 20 things. Just be aware that you're only one person and you can spread yourself on thick or thin across skill or skills and it really comes down only to you in which you would be happy doing.

    Last edited by gnarl; February 21st, 2012 at 10:48 AM.
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    Yeah. I can see that doing too many things will diffuse my focus. Right now I'm trying to focus on just following what I love to do, throw enough stuff at the wall, and hope it sticks.

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    Absolutely.

    Look at this man, Qiang-Huang. He is a full time physicist, and also a brilliant painter. He has been painting one piece a day after work since 2007, and that meager amount of practice has allowed him to build quite a skill set. The moral is, yes, certainly you can work in other fields and still become a good artist. Here are some of his artworks:









    See more here: http://qiang-huang.blogspot.com/

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    Dave McKean is my favorite example. I guess the question is how many things in a poly? Even the greatest geniuses have the restraint of time.

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    Didn't seem to stop Leonardo doing other things.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Plenty of people can do multiple things. The guitarist of Tool is someone who springs to mind. He has worked in special effects for ILM and he is the guitarist of a famous band. Those are two things that he obviously was able to reach great heights on.

    I'm of the belief that if I can excel at one thing, I will (not can...will) excel at another. It's just where I want to put my time.

    I believe that IN GENERAL, there is give and take. I have always wanted to start playing guitar, but starting that at 33...right when I have momentum on my freelance side-career just doesn't seem wise to me.I would excel at guitar in time...but I'd rather spend time pushing forward with art.

    Some people just learn faster than others and that is dependent on you. Only you can answer that.

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    You're going to be doing different things ANYWAY. It's not like someone is going to wander around after you doing your business stuff and your laundry (not until you have money to pay them, anyway). But time is limited. So at some point you'll need to sit down and figure out what you need to cut from your life to get ahead in the things you want to get ahead in. Once time and energy start being scarce, it's fairly easy to start dumping pursuits that don't move you forward or improve your life.

    Obviously you're going to fail at some of the things you work on, but that's part of the triage process.

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    Qiang-Huang has been painting for MANY years, it's just that in 2007 he started his daily painting stint.

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    In my opinion, it's going to be a lot easier if you focus and take one passion to a professional (or semi professional) level before looking to branch out. You can do it sooner, sure, but if you have too many things going on, there's a good chance of just distracting yourself from one fun project to the next. Taking one thing really far shows you how to approach the next thing, and I think the new skills develop even faster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    Didn't seem to stop Leonardo doing other things.
    Like diddling little boys, unfortunately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Like diddling little boys, unfortunately.
    He was also a diplomat and war machine designer.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Wilson View Post
    In my opinion, it's going to be a lot easier if you focus and take one passion to a professional (or semi professional) level before looking to branch out. You can do it sooner, sure, but if you have too many things going on, there's a good chance of just distracting yourself from one fun project to the next. Taking one thing really far shows you how to approach the next thing, and I think the new skills develop even faster.
    Yeah, trying not to get distracted and never completing anything can be an issue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    Didn't seem to stop Leonardo doing other things.
    True. He also was an outlier. Maybe I can figure out how to be an outlier, hahaha

    Quote Originally Posted by bcarman View Post
    Dave McKean is my favorite example. I guess the question is how many things in a poly? Even the greatest geniuses have the restraint of time.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty View Post
    Plenty of people can do multiple things. The guitarist of Tool is someone who springs to mind. He has worked in special effects for ILM and he is the guitarist of a famous band. Those are two things that he obviously was able to reach great heights on.

    I'm of the belief that if I can excel at one thing, I will (not can...will) excel at another. It's just where I want to put my time.

    I believe that IN GENERAL, there is give and take. I have always wanted to start playing guitar, but starting that at 33...right when I have momentum on my freelance side-career just doesn't seem wise to me.I would excel at guitar in time...but I'd rather spend time pushing forward with art.

    Some people just learn faster than others and that is dependent on you. Only you can answer that.
    Quote Originally Posted by vineris View Post
    You're going to be doing different things ANYWAY. It's not like someone is going to wander around after you doing your business stuff and your laundry (not until you have money to pay them, anyway). But time is limited. So at some point you'll need to sit down and figure out what you need to cut from your life to get ahead in the things you want to get ahead in. Once time and energy start being scarce, it's fairly easy to start dumping pursuits that don't move you forward or improve your life.

    Obviously you're going to fail at some of the things you work on, but that's part of the triage process.

    I think that's the thing really. This doesn't have a complete hard and fast answer. It's a question of degree. It's something that takes good judgement, and it also depends on the individual, since some people are more gifted in different areas, or have circumstances that allow them to spend more time on certain subjects.

    Also thanks for the example of Tool. That's really interesting. I'll have to go check that guy out.

    Also I think the triage process here is a good example. My thinking is to rapidly experiment by trying a lot of different things, and allowing myself to fail. When I fail, move on to the next process and see if that works instead.

    I think all in all, I've realized there aren't hard and fast rules on this. There's a lot of different situations and ways to make things work, especially with different goals in mind. I guess the only way to find out is work hard and seek out things that I care about in the here and now.

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    Hi TheDonQuixotic,

    If you haven't seen it, you may want to check out Steve Jobs' 2005 Stanford commencement speech. He discusses how, looking forward, it's not always clear how seemingly unrelated things may be interconnected. When you spoke about having so many interests, while also questioning their value, that commencement speech was the first thing that came to mind.

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    Here's a painting by Doc Hammer.
    Name:  Head_Study_No_2_by_Doc_Hammer.jpg
Views: 535
Size:  321.6 KB
    You might know him better as the guy who writes "The Venture Brothers" on AdultSwim.

    It's not impossible to get very good at more than one thing, but it is unusual..

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    You have to acquire sufficient skills in something, in order to be able to support yourself., If you can't support yourself and have some left over for pursuit if other things you are interested in, you end up homeless.
    It helps if that 'something' that pays your bills is something you enjoy doing too.

    Yes, it is possible to get to a level of marketable skill in more then just one thing, it takes time, education/learning and practice. Most often, when you find things that you have reasonable aptitude for, the one you engage and practice the most becomes your best one.

    Make sure you become proficient and self supporting in at least one thing by the time you have to go out on your own. If you don't accomplish that, you're going to have a rough road ahead.

    If you're independently wealthy, and are financially set for life... then you can do whatever you want, because you don't have the pressure to work in order to survive.

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    Well, I can almost guarantee that I am older, but unfortunately I was much wiser when I was 20 than I am now.

    Notwithstanding:

    Art is more than just a collection of skills. You have to have something to say, and you won't have anything to say unless you live your life. Earnest Hemingway is one of my favourite authors. Throughout his life he sucked up as much experience as he could and he poured it all into his writing.

    Also, different things are called for at different times in life. If you are young, and are so inclined, it's OK to do as much and as many things as you can. They will all find their way into your art, and your art will be more powerful for it. As the years go by, you may find that many lesser things will drop away, leaving only the truly important stuff. Many of the things you mention are not age friendly. They will drop away of their own accord. At some point you may find that the only thing left is your art. That is the time to go "balls out" on your art.

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    As for being an artist and doing nothing at all other than art, that simply does not happen. More than likely you're going to have to have a "regular" job or two to support yourself, or college classes, or college classes and a job, which is going to eat up a heck of a lot of time, and you'll have to do all the regular life things as previously mentioned (laundry, washing dishes, cooking food...) It's up to you to decide what you spend your free time doing. Once you come home from your (probably shitty) day job, do you sit down and draw for hours, or do you just crash out and play video games? Not to mention there WILL be times where you will sit down to draw and you will simply want to vomit on your workspace due to lack of inspiration (this happens to the best of us)

    By all means, if you have multiple interests, experiment with them. Eventually you'll settle on the things you like to do most, and can expand on those.

    In the past 10 years I've experimented with a ton of different mediums, from acrylic and oil paint, ink, coloured pencil, watercolour, charcoal, paperclay, etc. If I picked something up, tried it, and immediately hated it, typically I would just abandon it and not bother trying to become proficient at it, and now I'm quite settled working in pen and ink and primarily Sculpey. And within each of those mediums is also a million disciplines to learn, so really, the learning process never ends. Once you're "good" you can always become better at something.
    However, in dedicating the time to sculpting a lot of other things I would like to do got pushed to the side due to lack of time, like writing. The sad fact of the matter is you'll never have the time to get good at as many things as you would like to.

    Am I a professional artist, sustaining myself on art alone without having to work a day job? Hell no. That's a completely different animal entirely and one that takes a lot of kicking and screaming to accomplish.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDonQuixotic View Post

    What I mean is, I have polymath tendencies and I worried its going to ruin me. I enjoy learning and exploring lots of different subjects. I like trying new techniques, new mediums, and new materials. I'm an artist, but also a writer, and filmmaker. I also like working out, mountain climbing, traveling around, going to music shows, and having interesting life experiences and going on adventures. Theres lots of different subects outside of art that I'm interested in though to me all of these things relate to my art.
    It is ALL about perception!

    Film making: You still need to practice perspective + mood + whatever for like emotional shots + story boarding = Art is involved

    Writing: Can enhance your imagination, which will then give you creative new ideas for painting

    Mountain Climbing: Heh, well, something I can't do because my butt pulls too much gravity :p But I bet that if you can somehow bring a mini sketchbook and a pencil, and sketch a bit while taking a break (sitting or standing somewhere safely of course) you will get sketches nobody else will ever get!

    Working out: You should do that regardless! So should I actually... But eh, while working out like with weights, at least in my gym they have mirrors, which is kind of great to make you study anatomy while working out. Like if you do this, then your arm look like that etc.

    Traveling: Make a travel-sketchbook. You may even be life-painting a beach and palm trees while chilling in the shadow with a freshly squeezed exotic smoothie... *dream*

    Music shows: Unless you are insanely rich, it's limited how many you can afford of them anyway, and it's only for like a day a month then if anything. If small local shows, you can still observe and absorb on/off.

    Just see your options to combine as much as possible at any given time.
    I do that whenever I remember to

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Like diddling little boys, unfortunately.
    Given all the other stuff he was doing, I don't think he had all THAT much time for diddling. And as far as I can work out, the boys enjoyed it. :-)

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    Here's the only advice you ever need: If you take somebody's advice, you will end up like them.


    Bro, you're going to have to listen to this shit all of your life. You have to do it this way. You have to do it that way. You have to only do one thing or else you're screwed. Listen to all this nonsense and you're half dead already. By that, I mean you'll have wasted half of your potential.


    I get asked all the time "Can you even make money with art?" Well... can you? I'd be willing to bet that nobody asks Richard Schmid this question. Why? Because he's making a grip on art. So the answer to the question isn't "yes" or "no", the answer to the question is "You can't, because you've never tried (or gave up)."


    Who can properly estimate what you are capable of? Nobody. So do whatever you want. Try two things at once. Try three things at once. Recognize that there are real world limitations and then work hard to blow through them.


    People will be trying to box you in, limit your potential, tell you what is possible, distract you with nonsense, and advise you with bullshit, for the rest of your life. The only surefire way I know of to NOT accomplish your ambitions is to listen to them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Bremer View Post
    Hi TheDonQuixotic,

    If you haven't seen it, you may want to check out Steve Jobs' 2005 Stanford commencement speech. He discusses how, looking forward, it's not always clear how seemingly unrelated things may be interconnected. When you spoke about having so many interests, while also questioning their value, that commencement speech was the first thing that came to mind.
    Thats been my perspective on things. Jobs speech and some other people have talked about how random things can contribute to their work. Neal Stephenson was a science major, and that background gave him the ability to write such well researched science fiction novels.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flake View Post
    Here's a painting by Doc Hammer.
    You might know him better as the guy who writes "The Venture Brothers" on AdultSwim.

    It's not impossible to get very good at more than one thing, but it is unusual..
    Holy crap!

    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    You have to acquire sufficient skills in something, in order to be able to support yourself., If you can't support yourself and have some left over for pursuit if other things you are interested in, you end up homeless.
    It helps if that 'something' that pays your bills is something you enjoy doing too.

    Yes, it is possible to get to a level of marketable skill in more then just one thing, it takes time, education/learning and practice. Most often, when you find things that you have reasonable aptitude for, the one you engage and practice the most becomes your best one.

    Make sure you become proficient and self supporting in at least one thing by the time you have to go out on your own. If you don't accomplish that, you're going to have a rough road ahead.

    If you're independently wealthy, and are financially set for life... then you can do whatever you want, because you don't have the pressure to work in order to survive.
    This is true. I'm honestly not too worried about making a living. I feel capable enough in other areas to get a decent paying job. I think I'm less worried about starvation and more worried about personal failure, though once I put it in to perspective that kind of nebulous fear isn't exactly well founded pragmatism, so much as it is vague worry about the future.


    Quote Originally Posted by SavageGoldfish View Post
    As for being an artist and doing nothing at all other than art, that simply does not happen. More than likely you're going to have to have a "regular" job or two to support yourself, or college classes, or college classes and a job, which is going to eat up a heck of a lot of time, and you'll have to do all the regular life things as previously mentioned (laundry, washing dishes, cooking food...) It's up to you to decide what you spend your free time doing. Once you come home from your (probably shitty) day job, do you sit down and draw for hours, or do you just crash out and play video games? Not to mention there WILL be times where you will sit down to draw and you will simply want to vomit on your workspace due to lack of inspiration (this happens to the best of us)

    By all means, if you have multiple interests, experiment with them. Eventually you'll settle on the things you like to do most, and can expand on those.
    Thats encouraging. I may just need to work my way through this process rather than second guessing it. The stuff that doesn't work will fall away.

    Quote Originally Posted by Trixtar View Post
    It is ALL about perception!

    Film making: You still need to practice perspective + mood + whatever for like emotional shots + story boarding = Art is involved

    Writing: Can enhance your imagination, which will then give you creative new ideas for painting

    Mountain Climbing: Heh, well, something I can't do because my butt pulls too much gravity :p But I bet that if you can somehow bring a mini sketchbook and a pencil, and sketch a bit while taking a break (sitting or standing somewhere safely of course) you will get sketches nobody else will ever get!

    Working out: You should do that regardless! So should I actually... But eh, while working out like with weights, at least in my gym they have mirrors, which is kind of great to make you study anatomy while working out. Like if you do this, then your arm look like that etc.

    Traveling: Make a travel-sketchbook. You may even be life-painting a beach and palm trees while chilling in the shadow with a freshly squeezed exotic smoothie... *dream*

    Music shows: Unless you are insanely rich, it's limited how many you can afford of them anyway, and it's only for like a day a month then if anything. If small local shows, you can still observe and absorb on/off.

    Just see your options to combine as much as possible at any given time.
    I do that whenever I remember to
    This is actually pretty true. Working out has helped my understanding of anatomy, and other things have informed me in other ways. Hmmm. I'm going to try that travel sketchbook for the next time I go hiking.

    Quote Originally Posted by jetpack42 View Post
    Here's the only advice you ever need: If you take somebody's advice, you will end up like them.


    Bro, you're going to have to listen to this shit all of your life. You have to do it this way. You have to do it that way. You have to only do one thing or else you're screwed. Listen to all this nonsense and you're half dead already. By that, I mean you'll have wasted half of your potential.


    I get asked all the time "Can you even make money with art?" Well... can you? I'd be willing to bet that nobody asks Richard Schmid this question. Why? Because he's making a grip on art. So the answer to the question isn't "yes" or "no", the answer to the question is "You can't, because you've never tried (or gave up)."


    Who can properly estimate what you are capable of? Nobody. So do whatever you want. Try two things at once. Try three things at once. Recognize that there are real world limitations and then work hard to blow through them.


    People will be trying to box you in, limit your potential, tell you what is possible, distract you with nonsense, and advise you with bullshit, for the rest of your life. The only surefire way I know of to NOT accomplish your ambitions is to listen to them.
    Good point. I'm starting to understand that failure is part of the learning process. I don't know if I'm capable of this stuff until it doesn't work out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDonQuixotic View Post
    Is it possible to be an artist and work in other things than just art?
    Of course. And "art" can cover a huge range all by itself (illustration, design, photography, filmmaking... all visual art, all interconnected if you want them to be...)

    And as for life experience/adventure/going out and doing things and seeing things... OF COURSE you should do that! All that stuff you experience will only enhance your art in the long run. The more you think and see and experience, the more chock full your brain is with material you can use in your art. If you do nothing but mope around a studio all the time, your work is likely to become stale and repetitive and boring...

    Plus, getting out and seeing and doing other things keeps you in touch with your time and culture... If you plan to get into any kind of illustration, this is pretty essential. You don't want to get out-of-touch and dated.

    I've also heard a lot of advice that you have to specialize in order to make it as an artist. That you have to devote yourself to just art, and nothing else. My friend insists that if you want to make it as an artist, you can't be a polymath. You have to restrict yourself to just art, and not just art but a specific section of art. If you want to do illustration you can't do anything else. You have to spend all your free time drawing and nothing else, or else you're doomed to failure. You have to hone your skills to a razor sharp edge at the expense of putting time into other things.
    That's twaddle. You DO have to put a lot of time into it, yes - you can't just fiddle around being a dilettante... But that doesn't mean you need to become some kind of ultra-focused one-trick machine (unless that's all you ever really want to be...) In fact, it might be better to be flexible in this day and age, considering how fast the media and markets change.

    Consider this: back in the old days, artists were EXPECTED to be polymaths. Most artists offered a large range of services, including painting, sculpture, architecture, prints, enamel and glass work, miscellaneous work like costume and float design for pageants, theatre design, jewelry design, book illustration/illumination, etc. etc. etc... (And in the case of da Vinci, engineering, hydraulics, miscellaneous scientific research, etc...) If they could do it then, why not now?

    And these days there are many illustrators who do a large range of work, including multiple fields of illustration, concept art, animation, graphic design, interior design and window dressing, toy design, film, pretty much anything, really... And many book and comic artists also have to be able to write if they do their own original books/comics, so there's that.

    To take one example at random, there's people like Brian Froud (okay, so I thought of him because he just had a show here,) does a lot of illustrated books, including the writing in some, but also goes off and does major feature films on occasion. And monkeys with photography and puppets and whatnot on the side.

    So yeah, why NOT do everything? As long as you can focus on enough of the things you do to do 'em well, anyway...

    Neil Gaiman and Chuck Palahniuk both gave some advice to young writers that basically boiled down to "To be a good writer you have to write a lot, and live a lot of life. Get lots of life experiences and write a lot". This is my approach towards art also.
    Neil Gaiman has never given a word of bad advice. Or if he has, I've never heard it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixtar View Post
    Music shows: Unless you are insanely rich, it's limited how many you can afford of them anyway, and it's only for like a day a month then if anything. If small local shows, you can still observe and absorb on/off.
    Depends where you are. Around here, we get lots of free music shows all summer.

    Which, by the way, are GREAT sketching opportunities.

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    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    Depends where you are. Around here, we get lots of free music shows all summer.

    Which, by the way, are GREAT sketching opportunities.
    ...What kind of music?

    Gaaah, you lucky people!
    If I lived in NY I'd be at all Knicks' home games busy sketching :p

    Edit: All = Every!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trixtar View Post
    ...What kind of music?
    All kinds! Practically every park has a different series, so you get almost every genre sooner or later. Plus there's outdoor dance parties (okay, those aren't always free, but there's a lot of affordable ones...)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Artimatum View Post
    ? Honestly never heard that factoid about him,if I'm understanding what you mean.
    Not sure there's actually any evidence for it... Last I heard the probable state of Da Vinci's sex life was something like:

    Gay? Probably.

    Ever got any action? Probably not.

    And then theres the whole "ZOMG he was a transvestite because the Mona Lisa is actually a self-portrait!!" thing, for which the evidence is flimsy at best...

    Donatello, on the other hand...

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    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    Not sure there's actually any evidence for it... Last I heard the probable state of Da Vinci's sex life was something like:

    Gay? Probably.

    Ever got any action? Probably not.

    And then theres the whole "ZOMG he was a transvestite because the Mona Lisa is actually a self-portrait!!" thing, for which the evidence is flimsy at best...

    Donatello, on the other hand...
    From Wikipedia

    The only historical document concerning Leonardo's sexual life is an accusation of sodomy made in 1476, while he was still at the workshop of Verrocchio.[21] Florentine court records show that on April 9, 1476, an anonymous denunciation was left in the tamburo (letter box) in the Palazzo della Signoria (town hall) accusing a young goldsmith and male prostitute, Jacopo Saltarelli (sometimes referred to as an artist's model) of being "party to many wretched affairs and consents to please those persons who request such wickedness of him". The denunciation accused four people of engaging in sodomy with Saltarelli: Leonardo da Vinci, Baccino, a tailor; Bartolomeo di Pasquino and Leonardo Tornabuoni, a member of the aristocratic Tornabuoni family. Saltarelli's name was known to the authorities because another man had been convicted of sodomy with him earlier the same year.[22] Charges against the five were dismissed on the condition that no further accusations appear in the tamburo. The same accusation did in fact appear on June 7 but charges were again dismissed.[23] The charges were dismissed because the accusations did not meet the legal requirement for prosecution: all accusations of sodomy had to be signed which this one was not. (Such accusations could be made secretly, but not anonymously.) There is speculation that since the family of one of the accused, Leonardo Tornabuoni, was associated with Lorenzo de' Medici, the family exerted its influence to secure the dismissal.[24][25] Sodomy was theoretically an extremely serious offense, carrying the death penalty, but its very seriousness made it equally difficult to prove. It was also an offence for which punishment was very seldom handed down in contemporary Florence, where homosexuality was sufficiently widespread and tolerated to make the word Florenzer (Florentine) a slangword for homosexual in Germany.[26

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDonQuixotic View Post
    This is true. I'm honestly not too worried about making a living. I feel capable enough in other areas to get a decent paying job. I think I'm less worried about starvation and more worried about personal failure, though once I put it in to perspective that kind of nebulous fear isn't exactly well founded pragmatism, so much as it is vague worry about the future.
    About failures, especially the big ones, just about every time there are plenty warning signs ahead of time which will allow you to adjust course and avoid them. Life is a fluid ever changing situation, get used to adjusting as things happen, and you'll be fine.

    One thing that always gave me a good dose of a peace of mind is that whatever happens, I feel confident I can do my best to find a way to adjust and 'end up on top' so to speak. Especially in my 20's. I kept saying... I don't know the answers right now, but I'll figure them out by the time I need them... and almost always there's a chance to adjust course.

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    eenie meenie

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