Page 6 of 23 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast
Results 66 to 78 of 293

Thread: Does Anyone Else Feel This Way?

  1. #66
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,082
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,197 Times in 1,728 Posts
    FuzzieTingleTimes, Your questions are good but the answers are very involved. My beliefs about design and composition stem from research into the aesthetics of the period 1850-1930. These beliefs were denied, warped, or ignored by the Modernists and have fallen out of common knowledge with the passing of the decades. Most artists and art teachers don't know anything at all about composition as it was understood prior to the Modernist take over.

    You have a good mind for these things and your work shows talent and I encourage you to keep pursuing these questions.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #67
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    London
    Posts
    11,493
    Thanks
    3,796
    Thanked 5,868 Times in 3,972 Posts
    I actually like Matisse. I do find his compositions interesting. Here's a Matisse you might enjoy more.

    Attachment 1426399
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. #68
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,082
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,197 Times in 1,728 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    I actually like Matisse. I do find his compositions interesting. Here's a Matisse you might enjoy more.
    On the contrary, that picture only further proves the point, that he neither could draw nor compose at a professional level. Which explains exactly why he had to be a radical in order to survive as an artist.

    For example, leaving aside how dead Matisse's work is on an emotional level compared to the following picture, but look at how meek Matisse's patterning is compared to a real master of composition, Harvey Dunn... In Matisse's picture the pattern is provided by the textiles. In Dunn's picture, the image inhabits the pattern.
    Last edited by kev ferrara; February 20th, 2012 at 06:29 PM.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  6. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Posts
    1,221
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,535 Times in 567 Posts
    Man I love this piece kev. Making something with this much white and space work so brilliantly. Haven't seen it in awhile. Is it in his new book? Thanks.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. #70
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Posts
    217
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 36 Times in 22 Posts
    The picture itself doesn't make me sick..but the colours are too strong to enjoy looking at it. And my eyes jump around the picture. I have however had a similar experience to yours when hearing a song once.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #71
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,134
    Thanks
    115
    Thanked 691 Times in 418 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    Someone was telling me few months ago how days of 'static pictures' as visual art innovation are gone. The elements have been defined, everything has been explored and that since early 1900's and modernism, everything is just regurgitation.
    The statement may or may not be true, but it assumes that art has to be innovative. It doesn't. For artists to keep on making a living, you need nothing more than that people have to keep on buying art, whether that art is innovative or not.

    For art itself to keep on living, you need nothing more than for people to keep on drawing and painting, whether what they produce is innovative or not.

    Whatever exactly "innovative" even means in the first place. It seems to mean different things to different people, and one person's innovation is another's irresponsible and ugly experiment. We can see that even in this thread: some people here love Matisse, others consider his work okay, still others think it is ugly modernism (even though the works posted here are now a century old and by at least some standards very conservative!)

    Someone else mentioned something worth considering: art moves in cycles, rather than being a linear progression. In a very real sense, Matisse and Picasso did not so much invent something completely new, as simply returned to something very old:

    Does Anyone Else Feel This Way?

    Does Anyone Else Feel This Way?

    When a thing becomes old enough, we begin to experience it as wonderfully exotic and new. :-)
    ____________________________________________
    My sketchbook thread:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...ight=blogmatix
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #72
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    WA State
    Posts
    2,364
    Thanks
    796
    Thanked 1,272 Times in 887 Posts
    Does Anyone Else Feel This Way?

    So. . . Anyway. . .

    Did Kev ever break down and allow that Matisse is actually an "artist"?

    Or, is he still dismissing him as a "mere cartoonist?"


    (I personally think Jake's Matisse is pretty harsh. But, much as I like Wyeth, I'd say he's produced a "stinker" or two hisself. An' you know what? Wyeth would probably agree!)
    Last edited by Kamber Parrk; February 21st, 2012 at 01:25 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #73
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    43
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 22 Times in 14 Posts
    Ok, I think I get you now, Kev. That is a good painting you posted, it has a lot of purely abstract qualities at the same time as the figures are very alive and accurately captured.
    In Matisse's paintings the figures are often more like objects or icons, beings that are impossible to relate to. He pushes what he thinks is visually relevant to the point where it doesn't matter if it's a person or a lemon he paints. I think that is why you think it is emotionally lacking?

    Does Anyone Else Feel This Way?


    My gripe with a lot of realism is that it paints over and hides the compositional elements that would have made it interesting. Even in your Dunn, which I think manages a very good balance, I still can't help but feel that way. "Look at that white half circle echoing the black halfcircle on the other side of the canvas, show it to me dammit!" I wanna shout. I don't want to have to squint and imagine to see it clearly.
    But Dunn HAS to hide and understate it to keep the integrity of his figures, and ultimately it leaves me feeling that there is an abstract painting in there that wants to break free. I thought a little about Cy Twombly when I saw it...

    Does Anyone Else Feel This Way?

    It is a good painting, I like it and I don't think it should have been painted in any other way. This is just me explaining why I like a painter like Matisse better. In a painting that plays so much with compositional elements, I think that too realistic rendering gets in the way and hogs attention.
    I fully understand and respect that others feel differently, and the world would be a better place if we could agree that there are different points of view that all have their own validity. It is a good thing that there are so many different kinds of painters so we all can get our jollies somewhere!

    And thanks for the encouragement, btw!
    Last edited by FuzzyTingleTimes; February 21st, 2012 at 06:48 AM.
    Visit my SKETCHBOOK!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to FuzzyTingleTimes For This Useful Post:


  12. #74
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    California/Singapore
    Posts
    492
    Thanks
    49
    Thanked 269 Times in 173 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by FuzzyTingleTimes View Post
    My gripe with a lot of realism is that it paints over and hides the compositional elements that would have made it interesting. Even in your Dunn, which I think manages a very good balance, I still can't help but feel that way. "Look at that white half circle echoing the black halfcircle on the other side of the canvas, show it to me dammit!" I wanna shout. I don't want to have to squint and imagine to see it clearly.
    But Dunn HAS to hide and understate it to keep the integrity of his figures, and ultimately it leaves me feeling that there is an abstract painting in there that wants to break free.
    I think it comes down to personal taste all over again then, because those very reasons that you cite as being hidden in Harvey Dunn's work are the exact reasons I like it and think it's masterful In my view, it's easy to simply deal with formal ingredients, but requires a whole new level of sensitivity to arrange a narrative AND keep it graphically successful. I don't see those elements as hidden, I see them as a vital framework for the piece.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #75
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Newbury, UK
    Posts
    266
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 94 Times in 59 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    That's another good point you point out, about Picasso etc... about things moving in cycles, I heard that before too. Seems like modernists are touted as having come up with something new and revolutionary, but if you look far enough in art history, it doesn't seem like they did.
    picasso and others taking huge chunks of inspiration from 'primitive' art/medieval design etc. isn't something that's swept under the rug.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to cro-magnon For This Useful Post:


  15. #76
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Fallingwater
    Posts
    5,082
    Thanks
    1,529
    Thanked 5,197 Times in 1,728 Posts
    • The people who declare painting dead are usually looking for attention for themselves.

    • Design is an art, but not a deep one. People who have a designer's sensibility hate to hear that they aren't deep compared to a great painter/composer. And they don't see the difference in depth because they don't have the talent, so they feel they are being slighted in some pretentious way on some non-existent basis and it bothers them. The most trying issue when dealing with a weak imagination is that they don't have the ability to imagine that they aren't as talented as really talented people. I'm still trying to work on just why there will always be people who can't experience aesthetic emotion from anything but cartoons or graphics, where it is sitting right on the surface. It must be related to the fact that really strong, deep artwork is quite unnerving to many. Maybe because some people can't intuitively cogitate the synthesis of form and content at that level of complexity so they would prefer not to be confronted with it at all. I remember when I was a kid responding to really bold, loud expressionistic cartoons. And then that kind of work just went dead to me at some point and didn't cause any sense of wonder any longer.

    So, I don't think it is an accident that both modernism and the Sunday funnies cartoons both exploded in the culture at once in the early part of the 20th century. Because they both provide simple bold colors and outlines, simple poetics and content... entertainment for the mind of average sensitivity... the demos. The only difference is the level of frivolity in cartoons versus the aesthetic aims/claims and politics of modern art. (It is interesting to note how average of talent and sensitivity were the people who got involved in modernism, either as artists, fans, or philosophers.)

    Anyway, I"m just telling the truth as I see it. Hope nobody is offended

    • Bill, yes that Harvey Dunn is in the new book.
    Last edited by kev ferrara; February 21st, 2012 at 09:40 AM.
    At least Icarus tried!


    My Process: Dead Rider Graphic Novel (Dark Horse Comics) plus oil paintings, pencils and other goodies:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=101106

    My "Smilechild" Music. Plus a medley of Commercial Music Cues and a Folksy Jingle!:
    http://www.myspace.com/kevferrara
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kev ferrara For This Useful Post:


  17. #77
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    43
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 22 Times in 14 Posts

    Painting is not dead!

    @Kev
    I'm not offended, I'm pretty laidback and I think making claims about other people's sensibilities says more about yourself than anything else.
    I could speculate on why people need things muted down and prettified to be able to experience aesthetic emotion, but honestly I think it's pretentious and plain dumb to go on like that.

    On a serious note, it is always hard to understand why people don't like the awesome things we like. I don't doubt that you get a lot more out of Dunn than I do, but I also don't doubt that I get a lot more out of Matisse than you do. In the end I think the experience is quite similar. But we will never know, will we. All I can do is assure you that I get profound experiences when I look at the art I like, and it is very different from reading the sunday cartoons, jeez Kev!

    @Medelo
    Yes, I think it comes down to taste. I think it's strange to think that a painting or artist could appeal to all people, when people are so very different! Just look at music, even if I know people who like the same bands as me, we still don't like the same songs, and so on. I think it's one thing to recognize that something is good, but being personally touched by it is something altogether different.
    Also, Matisse does more than arrange formal ingredients. If that was all he did, I would agree it was shallow!
    Visit my SKETCHBOOK!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to FuzzyTingleTimes For This Useful Post:


  19. #78
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Denmark
    Posts
    447
    Thanks
    237
    Thanked 128 Times in 123 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by blogmatix View Post
    Perhaps it is intentional:

    "In my picture of the Night Café I have tried to express the idea that the café is a place where one can ruin oneself, go mad or commit a crime. So I have tried to express, as it were, the powers of darkness in a low public house, by soft Louis XV green and malachite, contrasting with yellow-green and harsh blue-greens, and all this in an atmosphere like a devil's furnace, of pale sulphur."

    Let's see if anyone here has a seizure, shall we? :-)
    *faint*
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Page 6 of 23 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Sometimes you feel like a nut...
    By dfacto in forum Artist Lounge
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: December 27th, 2005, 03:56 PM
  2. I feel like a kid asking this...
    By Gabriel_Scarlett in forum PAINTER
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: December 13th, 2004, 05:14 PM
  3. I feel as if this is done but....
    By stilts in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: November 11th, 2004, 04:26 AM
  4. Feel the Sky and Look up
    By Shorty_Sancho in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: July 8th, 2004, 11:51 PM

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook