Advice on anatomy studies
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    Advice on anatomy studies

    Basically i want to know how to go about doing them. I want to draw things like this;



    Is it worth it to keep doing classic anatomy studies? They've improved my understanding of how the body moves and how to build forms properly, but i feel like they're not really helping me develop a style akin to the one above. Any advice?

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    I'm not the expert on anatomy. But you need some understanding first to distort and exaggerate it without it seeming completely off, no?

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    yeah thats about the size of it, but i want to know some good ways for me to bridge the two. To take what i get from the anatomy studies and apply it to my style.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Professional Jouster View Post
    Basically i want to know how to go about doing them. I want to draw things like this;



    Is it worth it to keep doing classic anatomy studies? They've improved my understanding of how the body moves and how to build forms properly, but i feel like they're not really helping me develop a style akin to the one above. Any advice?
    Yes, of course it's worth it to keep doing anatomy studies. But additionally you need to study exaggeration and the principles of design for cartooning -- rhythm, shape, proportion, etc.

    Also, just because you like the style of a particular comic doesn't mean you have to be blind to its flaws. So you put good anatomy together with simplification and exaggeration and hopefully you get something good out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vineris View Post
    Yes, of course it's worth it to keep doing anatomy studies. But additionally you need to study exaggeration and the principles of design for cartooning -- rhythm, shape, proportion, etc.

    Also, just because you like the style of a particular comic doesn't mean you have to be blind to its flaws. So you put good anatomy together with simplification and exaggeration and hopefully you get something good out.
    I know, i definitely don't look to this as the be all end all of style and artistry, and i definitely don't want to copy it line for line. Do you know of any good resources on the cartooning principles you mentioned?

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    Loomis "Fun With A Pencil" would be a good start.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Professional Jouster View Post
    I know, i definitely don't look to this as the be all end all of style and artistry, and i definitely don't want to copy it line for line. Do you know of any good resources on the cartooning principles you mentioned?
    Animation books might be good. I got a lot of useful info from animation blogs. I particularly like Temple of the Seven Golden Camels, his early posts are a wealth of information. John Kricfalusi's blog has some interesting things to think about but you really have to read it through a filter because he has such strong biases, and there's a lot of stuff there that isn't really of any particular interest.

    And of course if you can analyze a style critically you can start adapting the bits you notice. A lot of it is just trial and error. A few years back I was into cartoonizing photos -- finding random photos of people on the net, breaking them down and exaggerating the poses, body types, attitude and so on. Like full-body caricatures. Caricatures, by the way, are interesting and difficult and they're good practice too, if you can handle the frustration of having some really ugly art.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Professional Jouster View Post
    I know, i definitely don't look to this as the be all end all of style and artistry, and i definitely don't want to copy it line for line. Do you know of any good resources on the cartooning principles you mentioned?
    Check out Walt Stanchfield's book 'Drawn to Life' (there are two volumes), he basically approaches figure drawing and abstraction in exactly the way you are looking for. Also Check out Steven Silver. He regularly uses live models to derive cartoons. He also has books, videos and apps that address the same subject.

    Last edited by JavierP; February 14th, 2012 at 02:35 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Professional Jouster View Post
    I want to draw things like this < . . . > Is it worth it to keep doing classic anatomy studies? They've improved my understanding of how the body moves and how to build forms properly, but i feel like they're not really helping me develop a style akin to the one above. Any advice?
    Keep the classic anatomy studies. You have to know how something works before you can distort it and still have it stay believable. In fact, you need to know it better than you'd need for a realistic picture.

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    I think absolutely more classic figure studies will help. I think the more you draw the body, and the more natural it starts coming to you, the more you naturally develop your own shortcuts and "style" for representing the figure. I think at first you draw as closely to what you see as you can, but the more familiar you become, the more your own voice starts to come out.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Professional Jouster View Post
    I know, i definitely don't look to this as the be all end all of style and artistry, and i definitely don't want to copy it line for line. Do you know of any good resources on the cartooning principles you mentioned?
    Try Ben Caldwell's "Action! Cartooning", which leans towards realistic cartooning, Tom Bancroft's "Creating characters with personality". Another option is Preston Blair's "Cartoon Animation", which covers the basics, although it is stylistically antique, and aiming at animation...

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    thanks for all the great input everyone. I've already checked out a few of the suggestions and they look very promising!

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    "Advice on anatomy studies"
    ...Do them.
    You won't be able to exaggerate something you don't understand. Draw real people. There's naked people all over the internet.

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