Drawing waaay to many things at the same time!
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  1. #1
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    Talking Drawing waaay to many things at the same time!

    I haven't posted here for a while... Probably 2 years or so. lol
    I've always been some kind of lurker here in conceptart.org.
    The problem is, I have a VERY short attention span.
    30 mins into a drawing and I'm already bored.
    So I decided that I should always draw at least 2 pictures at once.

    I haven't draw anything for at least 3 months. I drew both using only my imagination, because sadly, I get bored if I use way too many references.
    My personality sucks, that's why I progress slowly and have at least 60 drawings unfinished.

    I can see a few mistakes in the pictures myself, but I won't mention them, because I don't want to sound over protective about my drawings.

    (sorry for my bad english)

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  2. #2
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    Hey man

    I don't want to sound like a jerk, but to get any results in this field, self-discipline and concentration is a must. Honestly, you don't sound like you enjoy drawing much at all and you don't like using references? I think you might have to decide as to whether this is something you actually want to pursue.

    Having a "sucky personality" should not have any reflection on your artistic ability at this stage. All of us here are assholes sometimes, it's no big deal its part of being human. You don't sound like you have anything wrong with you to me, you just sound lazy, but thats something you can work on and fix if you really want to.

    Stop making excuses, step back and decide why you are drawing and making art, if you are just doing it for fun and don't want to improve at all, by all means keep doing what you're doing but crits won't do you much good. But if you are serious about it, exercise some self control, start keeping a sketchbook and delve into your work. Cut out the distractions, find a decent workspace and have fun with your studies.

    Oh and for what its worth, your English is great.

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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Star Eater View Post
    I don't want to sound like a jerk, but to get any results in this field, self-discipline and concentration is a must. Honestly, you don't sound like you enjoy drawing much at all and you don't like using references? I think you might have to decide as to whether this is something you actually want to pursue.
    I've never really thought about it. When I first joined conceptart.org, I really wanted to be an artists and maybe make a living out of it.

    I talked to a few veteran concept artists and asked them some questions.
    And after that, I decided I should focus my attention on my studies, not artists studies, but general ones.

    I'm studying Medicine right now so I don't have much time at all for anything.
    The thing is, although I LOVE my college and everything about Medicine, I feel the best when I'm drawing. But this "happiness" I feel while drawing disappear as soon as I see other artists' works.

    I don't want to profit with art, I just want to get better, and maybe get some respect from other artists. I've talked to some artists after I entered the Medicine School, and most of them get offended because art is more like a hobby to me, than a "serious" thing.

    I don't have a lot of free time to practice, I tried to have a sketchbook 2 years ago, but I ended up abandoning it. And to top it all, I'm lazy (really), maybe deep inside I don't take art too serious, but I have a HUGE desire to improve.

    I realized I improve the best (with my laziness and free time considered) by creating multiples pieces, abandoning most of them and creating new ones, with each new one I get better at least in something. But I would like an opinion on what I should focus my lazy-slow-improvement technique on.
    I might use up to 3 references (body parts) per picture, but after that I really get bored and rather create a new piece.

    (Sorry for the big text, it's just lately I haven't had the chance to talk to real artists)

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    Not a great way to ask for critiques, knowing that you'll give up and start something new
    Honestly, the only way you're going to get better is practice - doing foundation studies etc.
    But I don't think you'll do it.
    So concentrate on your forms and lighting for now, but don't expect huge improvements.

    (and also, with me not trying to be a jerk - don't expect to get a lot of critiques - its swings both ways - if we put the time and effort in to critique you, we expect you to do the same in response.)

    good luck to you.

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    Be a doctor. Paint on weekends. I wish I'd done that.

    Doing something well and making a living at it are two entirely separate prospects. Sunday painters have the most fun.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    I can sort of relate to you. There was a point in my life that I didn't take art very seriously, in that I never thought it would benefit me in any way as a career choice, so it was just a hobby and I only doodled on classes.

    Now taking things seriously is sort of a double-edged sword. Ideally, work/career choice should be something that a person enjoys doing the most, and not a day-job separate from "actual life". It's easy to learn these days that work is should be something that generally takes effort and causes stress and burnouts form time to time and that that's ok.

    If you're on the verge of realising that there is something in this world that has the power to make you happy, and there's work in the field, then you might be suited for the creative industry.

    That said, what WOULD benefit your work the most would be the studying of fundamentals (drawing/painting basic 3d forms, how light falls on objects, anatomy, composition etc) BUT seeing as you, like me, does art because it's FUN, my critique is to just draw the things you want to draw! If you like what you're doing, and keep doing it, you're hellbound to improve. I'm lazy, and if you're lazy (whatever that means) then staying motivated and inspired is way more important than the right way of studying. That is to say that having fun is more important than taking things seriously. Have enough fun with art and there will come a time when when you start producing more serious results.

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    It's alright...have fun, relax, and keep drawing when you feel like it. Maybe sometime in future, you all the sudden realize how much you need to learn, and that's the time you should start studying foundations.

    Many of us in here at CA have already gone through this, but maybe it's not the time for you yet. Go explore what you want to draw, and what you enjoy drawing the most. If you really love art, you will come back to this no matter which career you chose...so don't rush, take time and enjoy drawing tons of things

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    His name escapes me right now, but in my painting class last semester we looked at an artist who was a lawyer that did still life paintings on the weekends, and now he has work in galleries.

    Everyone artists has other things they're interested in, for you it's medicine, for me its' psychology, and you might be more interested in pursuing medicine as a career and art as a hobby, while I'm pursuing art and learning about psychology just for myself.

    Neither path is wrong, it's all up to you.

    As for critique/advice, the best thing to do is draw from life. Every serious artist will tell you the same thing, it's very important.

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