question for guys who paint black and white first.
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  1. #1
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    question for guys who paint black and white first.

    im finding that for where i am personally i like the do everything in black and white for values then coloring on top of it.

    however the problem is a simple "overlay" or "color" layer never give the look of me just painting it using color from the beginning.

    so does anybody have any tips or a process other than that one? or a way to get more "true" color out of this.

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  2. #2
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    This might help answer your question:
    http://www.ctrlpaint.com/home/2011/3...-to-color.html

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  3. #3
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    thats exactly what im talking about, but the not preview version of something like that.

    im also trying to learn to "render" without using lines finally and now id like to take this test picture i just did of some random internet girl from b/w to a colored picture.

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  4. #4
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    Because an overlay or colour layer only does half the job. It's akin to doing a wash or a glaze with watercolours or really thinned out acrylics or oils. You want a normal layer over the top whilst sampling from both your palette and observed colours from reference, but only do so when you think there is enough information to go from. The point of the wash is so that you can visualize the colour composition before moving on to the final render.

    Think of it as a second underpainting. When I was learning this technique I learned that a single surface isn't monochromatic and so you should use the underpainting also to get a good understanding about how the colour of the light is interacting with the planes of the volume of whatever you're rendering. A lot of it falls apart when you're using the exact same hue to colour the chin with the cast shadow under the jaw for example. It is an infinite variety of gradating hues, not a small set of objective surface colours with different values.

    Last edited by Beeston; February 6th, 2012 at 11:21 PM.


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  6. #5
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    The purpose of a b/w painting is a value study. You make it to inform your color work.

    You can use it as a base layer, but, as you've said, the result is usually lackluster. Treat it as another sketch, and paint the final color one looking at it, not over it.

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