Creation of a monster(face only) - please read

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  1. #1
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    Icon Creation of a monster(face only) - please read

    Hey, Newbie here again (:

    I'm a rookie still learning learning the ins and outs of concept art and have been studying character design for a while now,
    I just did a quick "mock up" of a fantasy creature and here are the stages


    1) Initial sketch
    Name:  creature sketch.jpg
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    2) Development of creature stage 1
    Name:  creature dev.jpg
Views: 323
Size:  39.1 KB

    3) Development stage 2 (current point)
    Name:  final.jpg
Views: 314
Size:  41.2 KB

    I know it's not perfect and any comments/critic would be appreciated!
    Thanks!
    S.D

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  3. #2
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    I think your biggest problem at the moment is a lack of planning and research and the fact that you're very dependent on lines to define your forms. You're calling the steps you've posted "development stages", but from the way I see it there's no actual development going on at all; nothing is changing.

    I advise you to take a step back and work on the design itself first. What is the creature like? In what kind of environment does it live? What does it eat, how does it move, how does it hunt (if it does)? Once you've established all that, start doing research. Gather references of animals and environments similar to your own description. Learn about the distinct features those animals have and why they have them; almost everything about any animal on this planet has some sort of purpose. To make your creature believable and impressive, you have to try to mimic that. Of course you can use your imagination, but the base you're working from should be a solid amount of knowledge of how things actually work in reality.

    As for the line problem; you need to try to build up your creature from the inside out. If you can, start with a basic skeleton (if you don't know what the skeleton looks like, look up references, as pointed out above). Then build the larger forms around that, you can even use simple geometric forms such as spheres and cubes to do so (in fact I think it would be good for you to practice drawing spheres, cubes and cylinders and the like to train your understanding of form). Try to think of it as sculpting on a canvas. It's not until you actually understand the form that you'll be able to start applying light and shadow properly.

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  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lhune View Post
    I advise you to take a step back and work on the design itself first. What is the creature like? In what kind of environment does it live? What does it eat, how does it move, how does it hunt (if it does)? Once you've established all that, start doing research. Gather references of animals and environments similar to your own description. Learn about the distinct features those animals have and why they have them; almost everything about any animal on this planet has some sort of purpose. To make your creature believable and impressive, you have to try to mimic that. Of course you can use your imagination, but the base you're working from should be a solid amount of knowledge of how things actually work in reality.

    As for the line problem; you need to try to build up your creature from the inside out. If you can, start with a basic skeleton (if you don't know what the skeleton looks like, look up references, as pointed out above). Then build the larger forms around that, you can even use simple geometric forms such as spheres and cubes to do so (in fact I think it would be good for you to practice drawing spheres, cubes and cylinders and the like to train your understanding of form). Try to think of it as sculpting on a canvas. It's not until you actually understand the form that you'll be able to start applying light and shadow properly.

    Thanks a lot for the very helpful and constructive critic, i find your advice very useful. Much appreciated

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    Thanks a lot for the very constructive and helpful critic, I'm just 15 and starting out so i'v got a lot to learn, thanks for the advice.

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    I would agree with Lhune on the need for further research matey, if you swing that lower Jaw up to close his mouth it would protrude out at the front like an open cash register!
    As it stands as a creature concept I can see what you are going for though so dont be to disheartened its not a disaster by any means.
    So go back to the planning stage and think through the story you want to show us and plan it out, it may seem a bit boring that way but as Lhune said it pays off big time in the end.

    all the best with the image mate.

    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook
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    Loomis textbooks; pencil and 1000 pages of printer paper; half a year of practice in structural drawing.

    Begin grinding.

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