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  1. #1
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    is it possible to develop your creativity?

    i dont know if this is a simple question, or if there is a simple anwser that i should already know.
    but i have this question lately.
    can i get better at having ideas?
    and if yes, how?
    i mean, if the answer is yes i figure by doing creative work i would get better, but like, finished pieces, tons of sketches, concepts with certain restrictions?

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    I'd compare it to something like writing. While yes some rare individuals just can write a creative and interesting story with no experience or knowledge. But moreso writers immerse themselves in others work, and philosophy, mythology anything and everything of the world around them. Even the overall similarities between all of them (reading Joseph Cambell a bit and it puts mythology in a new light)


    Few people have truly original idea's especially nowadays, but the more you expose yourself the more you have to work with in your head then once you have the technical skill you can express it easier and I guess more creatively.


    My 2 cents.

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    I'm finding creativity to be very much like a muscle, albeit a sometimes temperamental one. The more you use it, the stronger it gets. Noticed this even more with my writing than my drawing, but definitely with both.

    Also with drawing I found that the more I learned the more creative I was. But I realized that really it wasn't that my ideas were all that much better it's just that I was able to think more technically and thoroughly about an idea. And then when executing it the technical stuff didn't hold me back.

    "This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy." -Douglas Adams

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    There are all kinds of excercises and methods you can use to develop creativity. Reading classic fantastic literature is one of the best, imho. Do some research on creativity theory and you'll find tons.
    Here's a good place to start: Roger von Oech.

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  11. #6
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    Haven't checked your link yet Spirals...I'm sure it's interesting and in my experience creative thinking was actively discouraged in school.

    Edit: Wow...outstanding link! Thanks!

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  13. #7
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    wow guys, thanks a lot!

    im gonna check those links, and just draw a whole bunch of stuff in my sketch book.

    i dont find creativity coming easy to me, my mind is pretty blank when i start to draw, but hopefully it will get better
    i mean, i dont think i lack curiosity, i have a lot of it. but idk, its mostly on mundane things that im thinking and questionning, not fantasical or spiritual things.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Aragah View Post
    i mean, i dont think i lack curiosity, i have a lot of it. but idk, its mostly on mundane things that im thinking and questionning, not fantasical or spiritual things.
    Well maybe you should draw mundane things more often then. A magazine or website is just as likely to want a picture of a car as a dragon. If you can draw really cool cars (or buildings or plants or fashion or family life) and you enjoy it then you might get paid for it.

    At one point I was listening to an interview with a successful illustrator who said that he got his big break when he sat down, thought about what he really knew better than most other illustrators and started drawing that.

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    Creative thinkers are good at divergent thinking, which is basically proficiency at brainstorming with little to no limits. The more knowledge you hold, the bigger the brainstorm. On the contrary, there is convergent thinking, thinking based on a system or logic, such as mathematics and science, where one cannot stray too far your thoughts from a path of established laws. However, these uses of convergent and divergent thought are strictly used to define their generalized meanings.

    Convergent and divergent thinking reinforce each other. Brainstorms need to be filtered by logic to scrap the crappy or impractical ideas, so both logic and intuition are necessary to make something new and practical. Nobel Laureates take advantage of both ways of thought. On the contrary, there is a weak correlation between creative intelligence and IQ. IQ does not measure creativity directly, so there are different tests for creativity.

    Genius of creativity would result from years and years of practice. Experts agree that genuine creativity results from "intensive study, long reflection, persistence and interest"(persistence and interest requires you to have a goal). Albert Einstein published 248 papers(Papers not pages, so there are even more pages) on his theory of relativity before it was finished. Why is Einstein also a creative genius? Because he strayed from the norm of Newtonian physics. He questioned the laws established by his predecessor and he went off that course in his paths of thoughts. This is probably why he puts imagination ahead of knowledge(imagination conceived of the phenomena of teleportation, invisibility, and time travel, where no person of logic would tread in the past. Today we have partially accomplished, to certain extent as in not absolutely, these fore-mentioned phenonmena, whose possibilities were entirely neglected in the past).

    Creative individuals are open-minded, and receptive of new ideas even when these ideas may be too odd for others. They are able to see things from different perspectives. The hypothetically, purely conformed and systematic mind lacks this ability, and whose minds are unreceptive to new ideas, and so won't even attempt to see how something can be actualized by trying to see the issue at hand in a new light or from a different perspective.

    If you took a psychology course in your college, you would have known what I said here. Maybe it is not required in your college, but in NYC, it is a required class for any major in public schools, and I can see why. I refer to my psychology text book from time to time to answer people's questions, but also to refresh my mind on the subject matter.

    Last edited by Vay; January 26th, 2012 at 08:33 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aragah View Post
    i dont know if this is a simple question, or if there is a simple anwser that i should already know.
    but i have this question lately.
    can i get better at having ideas?
    and if yes, how?
    i mean, if the answer is yes i figure by doing creative work i would get better, but like, finished pieces, tons of sketches, concepts with certain restrictions?
    Yes, you have to get very nosy, get into everything, turn it up-side down, and look at it sideways, inside out, and keep seeing what shakes out. Something eventually does.
    And when someone says, don't press that button, do it just to see what happens. In other words, test the limits.

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    I find most of my writing ideas come from just noticing any time I chuckle to myself during the day thinking "wouldn't it be funny if.." I've always thought these things in passing, I think most people do. But when I started taking them seriously they began leading to full stories.

    Ex. See someone trip and sneeze at the same time. Wouldn't it be funny if every time you trip it triggered a sneeze? Well wouldn't the world have to be set up to make us trip less just so everyone wasn't sick all the time. Imagining signs warning of tripping hazards, sneeze guards everywhere. This is an absurd example but I've made a habit of following through on the thought of every "wouldn't it be funny if" musing that pops into my head during the day.

    "This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy." -Douglas Adams

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    Smile

    We wouldnt be artists, writers, musicians if we have no creativity we would be a drone mindlessly following orders

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    Elwell posted the whole image on some thread recently, but I'll give you a good quote from it:

    "The best way to have good ideas is to have a lot of ideas."

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    it can definitely be developed! I've always thought of creativity as like a muscle (like a lotta things!) Some people might naturally have more of it, but regardless of how much you have you have to work it and flex it to keep it strong and to build more.

    What an overwhelming lesson to all artists! Be not afraid of absurdity; do not shrink from the fantastic. Within a dilemma, choose the most unheard-of, the most dangerous, solution. Be brave, be brave! - Isak Dinesen
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    Also, perhaps creativity can develop with artistic skill? Numerous times I've had an idea for something, but I didn't have the technical skill to draw it the way I imagined, so it kind of just fizzled out. And sometimes I stay away from trying to draw a certain fleeting idea because I know it will fail until I do more studies.

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    I went to RISD during a particularly flakey period in its history. They spent a lot of time trying to teach us creativity, and no time at all teaching us how to stretch canvases or mix paint or draw biceps or choose paper or, you know, any of the stuff I was paying to learn.

    It gave me a jaundiced view of the relative importance of creativity versus craftsmanship in creating art people want to look at.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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  34. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vay View Post
    Why is Einstein also a creative genius? Because he strayed from the norm of Newtonian physics. He questioned the laws established by his predecessor and he went off that course in his paths of thoughts.
    And the fact that his work is heavily connected to that of Maxwell and Lorentz, apparently, doesn't mean anything. What matters is questioning Newton. Take that, Newton! Lorentz's motion equations so don't collapse into yours at nonrelativistic velocities!

    Questioning the laws / rules / tradition matters little in the end. It can be a necessary step toward doing something fresh. But you have to *create* something to be creative, and that something better not be chaos.

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    Yes, it can. So, sorry, now you have no excuse.

    Last edited by Elwell; February 13th, 2012 at 08:34 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    Questioning the laws / rules / tradition matters little in the end. It can be a necessary step toward doing something fresh. But you have to *create* something to be creative, and that something better not be chaos.
    In addition, Einstein didn't start with questioning Newton. He started with the assumption that the velocity of light is absolute, and developed his theory from this. At the end, this appeared to be inconsistent with Newton...

    We see people questioning the laws of physics every day, looking for perpetual mobiles, time machines and flying saucers. Their quest doesn't make them famous scientists...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Yes, it can. So, sorry, now you have no excuse.
    hah best answer. i think it sums up.

    i think that questioning stuff is great. but i dont think comparing to einstein is a good thing. im no genius(despite what mom tells me)

    i also feel like school played a part is the lack of creativity. but as Elwell, its no excuse.

    anywayyyyyysssss. back to drawing!
    good ideas or not. im gonna keep doing it

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