How do i make this good???
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Thread: How do i make this good???

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    How do i make this good???

    Last edited by pfloyd; January 22nd, 2012 at 06:41 PM.
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    god dammit. one sec....

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    One suggestion - desaturate the background mountains and blur the edges a little bit to simulate atmospheric perspective.

    It also looks to me like you've used a leaf brush. This may be personal taste, but I think you'd get more out of using reference photos and drawing the masses of leaves as units, complete with shading. Then, perhaps, use a leaf brush to add just a few clearly definable leaves. But when you look at a photo of a tree, how many individual leaves to you really see? You've done some of that and have depth there, which is good, but the leaves themselves don't work for me.

    Take a look at my series of in-depth critiques, like this one of Salvador Dali's hidden portrait of Lincoln.

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    Here’s a link that might help. http://www.wetcanvas.com/Articles2/135/120/

    My advice would be to study nature.

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    better?

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    Reference reference reference..you cant hope to capture the nature in your picture before you know how it really appears outdoors first.

    Copy off still life shots more. And read all the stickied information threads on the top of the page. On your stage it's impossible to just give critic on specific problems, since the whole image and all of it's aspects need tremendous amount of work.

    "Learn everything"

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    Your world just kinda ends at the mountains, making it look really fake and the mountains flat and cut-out. The mountains themselves seem to start right at the edge of the water, making them look really close and tiny. Tree branches don't grow quite like that. Leaves don't grow in flat layers, you had it more right the first time although the leaf brush had to go. The stream seems quite shallow and still so it's weird that it's so blue and doesn't seem to reflect anything.

    I'm not sure that the deep shadows really go with the overcast white sky.

    People aren't saying "reference" just to hear themselves type. It's hard to pull a good landscape together without doing tons of studies.

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    You’re basically being told to go back and study nature before you start painting stuff. I think we can all agree on that. If you’re serious about learning to paint, you’re going to have to learn how to do loads of research… like tons and tons of it. Here’s an example of the kind of research I’m talking about.

    http://www.gardenguides.com/89293-tr...ell-water.html

    Now how would that apply to your current painting? We don’t only study nature for accuracy in the rendering stage. We also study it for accuracy in our painted ecosystem.

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    got it, research and reference. should i be copying photographs?
    also, i spent most of my time working on the rock textures in the corner, was that at least worth it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by pfloyd View Post
    got it, research and reference. should i be copying photographs?
    also, i spent most of my time working on the rock textures in the corner, was that at least worth it?
    No. You should work from life to understand light, texture, value, atmospheric perspective, etc.

    They're ok, but shouldn't have taken more than five minutes...maybe less.

    Get theses two books: "Imaginitive Realism" by James Gurney and "Drawing Scenery" by Jack Hamm. Read them. Be prepared for the test.

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    me

    look at this part...
    Name:  Screen shot 2012-01-25 at 7.24.24 PM.png
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    sometimes for me it helps to ignore what I want an just start sculpting the forms......I know you want the whole composition to work, but Rome wasn't built in a day......make each rock go into space and before to long the whole piece will feel deep.....right now it is very flat....

    Last edited by williams73; January 25th, 2012 at 08:32 PM. Reason: double
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    Thats what I did in the second pic I posted, still flat?

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    Yes it’s still flat. Detailing rocks isn’t going to make your image any better if you don’t already have a strong composition. You need to study light from real life, and understand how values work. Google is your friend. In the image below, I’ve placed part of your image next to a paintover that I did in less than five minutes on my laptop with the stupid touch pad. This is not in any way to show you what a fantastic artist I am, because I’m not. This is to show you what a working knowledge light and value will do for you. There’s no reason to spend hours trying to do detail work. Spend those hours in study.

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    Hi pfloyd, I agree with "David a ray" but only about studying nature....Your eye's don't work like a camera so don't pretend to be one. Details, details, details...and then add definition to everything...If you can see definition on the left or right of something, then there should also be some on the opposite side...Shadow below element, highlight "on" element....(don't use black or white for this as they are the enemy) Things don't just disappear in a shadow nor in a highlight. With the leaves in the tree, adding some shadow and highlight to a few of them would go a long way as would the same treatment to the rocks ....

    The next thing would be composition....You can't learn it over night but always keep this in mind when designing or laying out a new image/painting or sketch etc "optically your canvas is divided into 3 parts, top, center and bottom or left, center, and right. Whatever the focus element of the image is, it should rest somewhere in the optical center or on one of the dividing lines... otherwise it will just look out of balance, but its a choice too! I hope have not been to harsh and that this helps!

    I too am a newb here and have been unsuccessful in posting anything here on this site ...since you have could you please give me a heads up on how to go about it? or where the instructions for posting a "WIP" are !

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    Quote Originally Posted by TArnell View Post
    I too am a newb here and have been unsuccessful in posting anything here on this site ...since you have could you please give me a heads up on how to go about it? or where the instructions for posting a "WIP" are !
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=79774

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