Scanning pencil sketches?
 
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  1. #1
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    Scanning pencil sketches?

    Hi

    whenever I scan a pencil drawing, all the lighter lines and lighter values dissapear. even at very high resolutions it does this.

    How can I cure this?
    It's an HP scanner.

    Thanks
    Michael

    I'm trying to think... but nothing happens.
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  3. #2
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    I ran into the same problem... Tried darkening, adjusting the gamma of the scan (which DID help some), even had the idea that maybe polorazing the scanner light might help (nope),
    My solution is to use a toned paper - Stonehenge makes a print paper that's a light grey and that seems to do the trick for me.

    I'd be interested in hearing other solutions too though!

    BM

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    Hi,

    You might find this thread at Sijun Forums' Digital Art Discussion forum helpful:

    Maintaining pencil quality in scans



    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
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  5. #4
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    Whenever I have had to scan a peice of sketchwork... I've always found myself having to get a good uni-ball pen and tediously go over ALL the lines I want to scan. Personally while I find this to be a LOT of work I find it to be effective. Unfortunately this limits me to using only one line width and darkness and all shading has to be in stipling or cross-hatching, none of the subtleties of the good old pencil drawing. It does pay off to scan your work at times... I do it both for web publishing as well as making reproductions of my original works... I feel a lot safer toying with coloring and whatnot if I know the original isn't the one I'll screw up if and when I do screw up.

    Best of luck, I personally hope you don't have to start re-drawing every line you skecth

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    with scanning in drawings ive found the best thing to do once ou've got it into photoshop you can fiddle with the curves, bring this window up by pressing ctrl+m
    and then fiddle with the graph, usually drop the lower side to darken dark parts and depending on what you want, increase the higher levels a tiny bit too.
    i find this a really great way to adjust images, you can really fine tune colours and levels!!

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    Thanks Guys
    most of the stuff mentioned I have tried though,
    I used to ink my pencil stuff when scanning, but I specifically want penciled scans

    I see the link that Jin gave has quite a few things I haven't tried, like that tonal scale ramp (I didn't think anything like that might work). and i didn't know the scanner has a sweet spot... oh well. I shall try this

    :chug:
    Cheers

    I'm trying to think... but nothing happens.
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    Personally, I scan the drawing at a high resolution, then use Photoshop to brighten the image. This eliminates the paper-texture that scans as well. I then use Image > Apply Image. This makes the darks blacker, while keeping the lights light. The hieghtened contrast is a different look than that achieved with the Contrast controls. The end result is something like this:


    Scanning pencil sketches?

    As you can see, strong lights and darks, without the washing out the contrast controls cause.

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  9. #8
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    Sorry that I'm posting in this old thread but I found this interesting tutorial for preparing scanned images.

    Hope you can use it :-]

    • Link

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  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hedge-o-Matic
    Personally, I scan the drawing at a high resolution, then use Photoshop to brighten the image. This eliminates the paper-texture that scans as well. I then use Image > Apply Image. This makes the darks blacker, while keeping the lights light. The hieghtened contrast is a different look than that achieved with the Contrast controls. The end result is something like this:

    As you can see, strong lights and darks, without the washing out the contrast controls cause.
    Hi Hedge,

    If you don't use Brightness/Contrast, how do you "brighten the image"?

    Also, when using Image > Apply Image, what Blending Mode do you use?

    I tried this by using Brightness/Contrast and just moving the Brightness slider up a little. Then I used Image > Apply Image and the default Blending Mode, Multiply.

    Even without knowing exactly how you did it, I can see it's a very neat way of adjusting a scanned image.

    Not much of a Photoshop user, so that should explain my somewhat beginner like questions (though I've used Photoshop for a few years, surprisingly enough). Guess that's what comes of being immersed full time in Corel Painter all these years.

    Thanks for the tip, and for anything you can add to clarify things for me.


    Jinny

    Last edited by Jin; June 28th, 2004 at 02:16 PM.
    Please do not PM me with Painter questions. Instead, post them here where everyone can benefit from them. Thanks!

    Jinny Brown
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  11. #10
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    A simple way to solve this is to first of all, if you have just a simple greyscale sketch, then select the layer in Photoshop and go Image -> Adjustments -> Hue/Saturation and take the Saturation all the way down to 0, hit OK.

    And then to define the lines more, and clean it up go Image -> Adjustments -> Levels (Or CTRL+L), and press the 'Auto' button, hit OK. If this causes undesirable effects, undo the operation by pressing CTRL+SHIFT+Z (Step backward), then bring up the Levels box again (CTRL+L) and do it manually. 2

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